Cases reported "Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms"

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11/40. Unusual presentation of nasopharyngeal (juvenile) angiofibroma in a 45 year old female.

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare tumour, comprising 0.05% of the head and neck tumours, histologically benign, locally invasive, and has a specific predilection for nasopharynx and adolescent males. This article presents an unusual case of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a 45-year-old female patient, manifesting as a destructive maxillary lesion and discusses the two most important factors regarding this tumour, the etio-pathogenesis and spread.
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keywords = neck
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12/40. Maxillary sinus carcinoma: the only symptom was neck lymph node swelling.

    OBJECTIVE: Since maxillary sinus is composed of bone structure, the main symptoms of maxillary sinus carcinoma are related to the anatomical feature and the destructive lesion of the bony wall, such as cheek pain and nasal obstruction. methods: We report a female case with undifferentiated carcinoma in the right maxillary sinus, only appearing cervical swelling which was revealed as lymph node metastasis. RESULTS: CT and MRI findings showed just maxillary sinusitis with minor bone destruction. However, fluorine 18-labelled deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was useful for the detection of the primary site. The patient received concomitant chemoradiotherapy, and showed a complete response both in the primary site and neck lymph nodes. She has no recurrence for 18 months after the primary therapy. CONCLUSION: The main symptoms of maxillary sinus carcinoma are related to the local progression, and known to have less cervical lymph node metastasis. However, like the present case, there is a rare case that has no symptom and organic features associated with the local mass. With the best use of advanced diagnostic technique, e.g., FDG-PET, we could diagnose and treat atypical maxillary sinus carcinoma patients.
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ranking = 5
keywords = neck
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13/40. Isolated maxillary sinus Ewing's sarcoma.

    Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma is rarely found arising in the head and neck region. Only six cases of extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma invading the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses have been reported in the literature. The first described case of that Ewing's sarcoma located in isolated maxillary sinus extending into the orbita without involving the nose is presented. A 16-year-old woman presented with swelling in her right cheek. The nasal examination was normal. A computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the sinuses revealed a large mass in the right maxillary sinus with extension to the orbita. Under general anesthesia biopsies were taken. Based on histopathological analysis, a diagnosis of extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma was made. The patient did not accept the surgical therapy. The patient was treated with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patient has done without evidence of recurrence or metastasis for one year.
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keywords = neck
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14/40. MALT lymphoma of the paranasal sinuses and the hard palate: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Extra-nodal low-grade B-cell lymphomas arising in the gastrointestinal tract recapitulate the structure and features of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, called "MALT lymphomas." In the head and neck region except for the salivary glands the occurrence of this neoplasm is very rare. The authors report on two such cases of MALT lymphoma, one of the hard palate in a 71-year-old woman and the other of the paranasal sinuses in a 69-year-old woman with the history of chronic sinusitis. Such chronic inflammatory conditions can induce the development of MALT lymphoma. Clinical elaboration should include computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of tumor extension, bone destruction, lymph node involvement and differentiation of mucosal thickening from tumor mass. biopsy for histopathological diagnosis is mandatory. Treatment should be surgery, irradiation or combined radio-chemotherapy depending on the stage of the disease.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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15/40. Sinonasal adenoid cystic carcinoma seeding to the tracheostomy site.

    Neoplastic seeding of head and neck carcinomas is a well-documented but relatively rare occurrence. We report a rare case of seeding of a sinonasal adenoid cystic carcinoma to a tracheostomy site.
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keywords = neck
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16/40. Chronic sinusitis unresponsive to medical therapy: a case of maxillary sinus actinomycosis focusing on computed tomography findings.

    actinomycosis of the paranasal sinuses is a rare occurrence and its clinical presentation does not suggest a specific diagnosis. Therefore, actinomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of neoplasms and granulomatous lesions of the head and neck region. However, the differentiation from a malignant neoplasm is not easy because the radiological findings are frequently similar and positive cultures are difficult to obtain. This report highlights the clinical progress of paranasal actinomycosis associated with some computed tomography findings that can be extremely helpful in the correct diagnosis. The characteristics of the disease are described and the relevant literature is discussed.
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keywords = neck
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17/40. Malignant mucosal melanoma of the right maxillary sinus: a case report.

    The case of a 74-year-old female is reported. The patient was under long-term review for melanosis affecting the mucosa of the upper right alveolar ridge. The patient developed a primary mucosal melanoma at the site 5 years later and underwent a right maxillectomy and a modified right neck dissection to level 5 nodes. The defect was covered with an obturator; the patient is at present clinically disease free. Mucosal melanomas account for 1% of all melanomas reported. This is a more aggressive tumor than the cutaneous melanoma, which is reflected in the low survival rate of 3 years (approximately 50%). Of the patients that survive to 5 years, 50% will have residual disease. Surgical procedure is indicated to reduce the tumor burden, but difficulties associated with gaining complete resection mean that both local and distant metastasis is problematic. More radical resection and adjunctive radiotherapy have not been shown to increase survival times.
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keywords = neck
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18/40. Beware of malignant lymphoma masquerading as facial inflammatory processes.

    Considerable difficulty exists in diagnosing some sarcomas, lymphomas, and carcinomas that develop in the head and neck. Frequently these malignancies appear clinically as masquerading inflammatory disease processes. Recognition of these rare lesions usually occurs only after the inflammatory-like symptoms have failed to respond to conventional management, necessitating a more extensive evaluation and even repeated biopsies. The use of special stains, immunohistochemical studies, electron microscopy, and immunofluorescence techniques may still produce an inconclusive histopathologic diagnosis. This case report documents a rare extranodal malignant lymphoma of the right maxillary sinus that mimicked an odontogenic infection with superimposed chronic rhinosinusitis in a 19-year-old sailor. The cause of his chief complaint and presenting symptoms challenged the astuteness of clinicians, surgeons, and histopathologists on two continents and the high seas. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for malignancy when inflammatory-like lesions fail to respond to the usual appropriate management. Indications for early biopsy of suspect lesions and aggressive follow-up are emphasized.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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19/40. Carotid thrombosis following neck irradiation.

    Therapeutic irradiation may accelerate atherosclerosis, increasing the risk of vascular stenosis or occlusion several to many years following radiation. However, intimal damage following irradiation may result earlier in thrombosis without stenosis. This report discusses three cases of carotid occlusion that occurred within 3 years of moderate dose irradiation. Angiographic studies showed that occlusion occurred in the absence of atherosclerotic stenosis. A review of the literature supports the conclusion that people who receive neck irradiation are at risk not only for the delayed development of diffuse atherosclerosis but also for thrombotic occlusion within months to several years. We suggest that patients who develop neurological symptoms or signs following neck irradiation, regardless of age, dose of radiation, or interval since radiation, should be evaluated for carotid or vertebral artery disease.
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ranking = 6
keywords = neck
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20/40. Haemangiosarcoma of the maxillary antrum.

    Angiosarcomas are extremely rare in the head and neck and the histological diagnosis is often difficult. We present a case of a haemangiosarcoma of the maxillary antrum in a 33 year old male. The histological diagnosis and subsequent management are discussed.
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keywords = neck
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