Cases reported "Maxillary Sinusitis"

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1/15. Odontogenic sinusitis causing orbital cellulitis.

    BACKGROUND: Odontogenic sinusitis is a well-recognized condition that usually is responsive to standard medical and surgical treatment. Current antibiotic therapy recommendations are directed against the usual odontogenic and sinus flora. CASE DESCRIPTION: The authors present a case of a patient with acute sinusitis initiated by a complicated tooth extraction that did not yield readily to standard treatment. The case was complicated by orbital extension of the sinusitis. The authors isolated methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, species from the affected sinus that usually is not encountered in uncomplicated acute nonnosocomial or odontogenic sinusitis. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Though such forms of resistant microbial flora as MRSA are rare, they may be seen in patients who have a history of intravenous, or i.v., drug use and in immunocompromised patients. Management of patients with orbital extension of sinusitis requires hospitalization and i.v. antibiotic treatment.
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2/15. Ectopic eruption of maxillary molar tooth--an unusual cause of recurrent sinusitis.

    A 17-year-old male presented with a 3-month history of cough associated with right-sided purulent rhinorrhoea and right facial pain. Nasal endoscopy confirmed the presence of mucopus from the right middle meatus. Plain sinus X-ray assessment showed the presence of an ectopic molar in the right anterosuperior aspect of the maxillary sinus entrapped in soft tissue. Surgical removal of the tooth and the diseased antral tissue was undertaken via a Caldwell-Luc procedure with resolution of symptoms.
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3/15. Unusual tooth sensation due to maxillary sinusitis--a case report.

    maxillary sinusitis can cause pain or discomfort to the maxillary dentition but no report of patients complaining of a "jumping tooth sensation" during sinusitis has been recorded in the literature. This article presents a case of an unusual localised sensation from a maxillary right second premolar experienced while undergoing root canal treatment. This sensation was felt during walking while the patient was suffering an episode of influenza. This sensation first occurred following debridement of the root canal. However, it persisted even after the root canal had been sealed. A hypothetical explanation of this manifestation is proposed.
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4/15. Nonsurgical treatment for odontogenic maxillary sinusitis using irrigation through the root canal: preliminary case report.

    As a new nonsurgical treatment for odontogenic maxillary sinusitis (OMS), irrigation of the maxillary sinus through the root canal of the causal tooth was carried out to the patient with OMS that had proved refractory to conservative treatments (i.e., root-canal treatment of the causal tooth and antibiotic therapy). Clinical signs, symptoms, and radiographs before and after the new treatment revealed evidence of good healing. The clinical signs and symptoms, such as oppressive pain in the cheek and retrorhinorrhoea, entirely disappeared immediately after the irrigation (which was done only once) without pain, and the obstructed ostiomeatal unit was aerated on the follow-up CT images. There was no side effect associated with saline irrigation, nor any recurrence of symptoms since the irrigation. We therefore propose the irrigation through the root canal of the causal tooth as a new treatment for periapical disease-induced maxillary sinusitis, a technique that should ensure proper ventilation and drainage by relieving obstruction of the ostiomeatal unit.
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5/15. Healing of maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin following conservative endodontic retreatment: case reports.

    Because of the anatomical proximity, infection of posterior upper teeth can spread into the maxillary sinus. When confronted with a large persistent periapical lesion on a posterior maxillary root-treated tooth, the practitioner should question the quality of the previous endodontic treatment, evaluate the impact of the potential causes of failure and consider, in the majority of cases, the conservative non-surgical retreatment instead of extraction or periapical surgery of the dental element. This paper reports two cases of healing of extensive periapical bone destruction and of the co-existing sinus pathology of odontogenic origin after non-surgical endodontic retreatment of previously root-treated upper molars. Misconceptions concerning the role of epithelium in the periapical lesion are discussed. Also, emphasis is put on the need of precise radiological diagnosis, pre-operatively as well as post-operatively to ascertain healing and to avoid unnecessary delay in the appropriate management of these patients.
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6/15. Endoscopic extraction of an ectopic third molar.

    An ectopic third molar within the maxillary antrum was found to be the etiology of recurring sinusitis. The fully erupted tooth was extracted endoscopically.
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7/15. Ectopic eruption of a maxillary third molar tooth in the maxillary sinus: a case report.

    Ectopic eruption of teeth into regions other than the oral cavity is rare although there have been reports of teeth in the nasal septum, mandibular condyle, coronoid process, palate, chin, and maxillary sinus. Occasionally, a tooth may erupt in the maxillary sinus and present with local sinonasal symptoms attributed to chronic sinusitis. We present a case of an ectopic maxillary third molar tooth that caused chronic sinusitis in the maxillary sinus.
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8/15. maxillary sinusitis and periapical abscess following periodontal therapy: a case report using three-dimensional evaluation.

    BACKGROUND: maxillary sinusitis may develop from the extension of periodontal disease. In this case, reconstructed three-dimensional images from multidetector spiral computed tomographs were helpful in evaluating periodontal bony defects and their relationship with the maxillary sinus. methods: A 42-year-old woman in good general health presented with a chronic deep periodontal pocket on the palatal and interproximal aspects of tooth #14. Probing depths of the tooth ranged from 2 to 9 mm, and it exhibited a Class 1 mobility. Radiographs revealed a close relationship between the root apex and the maxillary sinus. The patient's periodontal diagnosis was localized severe chronic periodontitis. Treatment of the tooth consisted of cause-related therapy, surgical exploration, and bone grafting. A very deep circumferential bony defect at the palatal root of tooth #14 was noted during surgery. After the operation, the wound healed without incidence, but 10 days later, a maxillary sinusitis and periapical abscess developed. To control the infection, an evaluation of sinus and alveolus using computed tomographs was performed, systemic antibiotics were prescribed, and endodontic treatment was initiated. RESULTS: Two weeks after surgical treatment, the infection was relieved with the help of antibiotics and endodontic treatment. Bilateral bony communications between the maxillary sinus and periodontal bony defect of maxillary first molars were shown on three-dimensional computed tomographs. The digitally reconstructed images added valuable information for evaluating the periodontal defects. CONCLUSION: Three-dimensional images from spiral computed tomographs (CT) aided in evaluating and treating the close relationship between maxillary sinus disease and adjacent periodontal defects.
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9/15. Orbital abscess of odontogenic origin. Case report and review of the literature.

    A case is discussed of a patient with an orbital cellulitis and a post septal abscess secondary to infection from an upper molar tooth. Spread of infection was to the maxillary sinus and thence to the orbit via a defect in the orbital floor. The clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, value of CT scanning, treatment and possible complications are reviewed.
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10/15. Computed tomography in the evaluation of postoperative maxillary cysts.

    Twenty-two cases (34 sides) of postoperative maxillary cysts evaluated with axial and coronal computed tomograms were reviewed. Precise characteristics pertaining to the extent of maxillary sinus involvement, loculation, presence of septae, bony perforation, and associated cystic projection or extension into adjacent structures were determined. Of the 34 sides, 13 cysts involved the sinus completely. Twelve were multilocular. Thirteen exhibited incomplete septae. Perforations were most frequent in the anterolateral and medial bony walls (28 and 27, respectively); however, the 14 posterolateral wall perforations showed a higher percentage of cystic projection into adjacent structures. Ethmoid extension was seen on two sides, orbital extension on one. Nine sides showed tooth roots communicating with the cyst. The routine use of computed tomography in the evaluation of this type of cyst is proposed.
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