Cases reported "Median Neuropathy"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/8. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of median nerve lesion after endoscopic carpal tunnel release.

    Deterioration of pre-existing signs or appearance of a nerve deficit raise difficult problems during the complicated course following endoscopic carpal tunnel release. One possible explanation is transient aggravation of nerve compression by passage of the endoscopy material, but these signs may also be due to incomplete section of the flexor retinaculum or an iatrogenic nerve lesion. Each case raises the problem of surgical revision. The authors report three cases of open revision in which MRI allowed a very precise preoperative diagnosis of the lesions and all of the MR findings were confirmed during surgical revision. In the first case, MRI showed section of the most radial branches of the median nerve (collateral nerves of the thumb, index finger and radial collateral nerve of the middle finger). The proximal origin of the nerve of the 3rd web space, above the retinaculum, an anatomical variant, was also identified. Section of 2/3 of the nerve of the 3rd web space, proximal to the superficial palmar arch, was observed in the second case. Simple thickening of the nerve of the 3rd web space, without disruption after opening of the perineurium, was observed in the third case. MRI therefore appears to be an examination allowing early and precise definition of indications for surgical revision in this new iatrogenic disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/8. [Proximal neuropathy of the median nerve]

    In a 77 year old man the rare clinical picture of a complete lesion of the median nerve at the upper arm is described. During removal of a "neurinoma" at the upper arm, inadvertedly the general surgeon had also transsected the median nerve. However diagnosis was delayed due to electrodiagnostic tests, which erronously interpreted the volume conduction of the neigbouring nerves as partial function, and later even as improvement of the median nerve function.Clinically he presented with "orators" hand. He was unable to pinch thumb and index finger, Sensory loss was noted at the fingertip 2 and 3, atrophy of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and trophic skin changes with an ulcer at the tip of the index finger.Nerve revision confirmed the median nerve transsection. Intraoperative nerve stimulation could not elicit distal muscle stimulation. sural nerve transplant was performed and within one year a positive Tinel sign progressing 20 cm distally to the operation site, without distal motor or sensory changes was observed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/8. Postoperative edema after vascular access causing nerve compression secondary to the presence of a perineuronal lipoma: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: median nerve neuropathy can be clinically devastating to a patient. It can be caused by compression of the median nerve anywhere along its course. We present the case of delayed median nerve neuropathy after the placement of a vascular graft in the arm. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: An arm shunt was placed in the nondominant upper extremity in a 60-year-old man with end-stage renal disease. Twelve hours postoperatively, the patient developed neurapraxia in the median nerve distribution in the hand. INTERVENTION: Exploration of the arm revealed a lipoma coursing along and deep to the median nerve. Resection of the lipoma decompressed the nerve. CONCLUSION: In this patient, median nerve neuropathy was caused by a lipoma and postoperative swelling from placement of the vascular graft. The swelling that occurred after the shunt placement unmasked subclinical compression of the nerve by a lipoma deep to the median nerve. To our knowledge, this report is unique in documenting damage to the median nerve after vascular graft placement as a result of an occult mass.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/8. Plexiform schwannoma of the forearm.

    We report a case of plexiform schwannoma located in the flexor muscles of the forearm in the absence of other signs of neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis. Magnetic resonance examination revealed a multinodular irregular inhomogeneous mass. Some nodules displayed a peripheral, high intensity rim and a central low intensity (target sign) on T2-weighted images. Pre-operative diagnosis of the rare plexiform schwannoma may be possible with careful imaging examination for the target sign.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/8. Multiple schwannomas of the median nerve: a case report and literature review.

    We report a case of multiple schwannomas of the median nerve. Multiple schwannomas can be difficult to diagnose on clinical grounds and can be mistakenly diagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome or ganglia as in our case. Nerve conduction studies helped locate non-visible tumours. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful in the preoperative planning of these tumours. The appearances on scanning however can be sometimes confused for ganglia as in this case. Intraneural dissection of the schwannomas was carried out and the pathology is described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/8. role of sonography in the preoperative assessment of neurilemmoma.

    This case report illustrates the role of high-resolution sonography in the preoperative assessment of a neurilemmoma of the median nerve in the forearm. Sonography identified the 3-dimensional localization of the nerve tumor its origin from a nerve fascicle, and its relationship with noninvolved nerve fascicles, facilitating the surgeon's approach to preserve noninvolved fascicles.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/8. Lobulated schwannoma of the median nerve: pitfalls in diagnostic imaging.

    The authors report an unusual case of volar wrist swelling with the appearance of a simple ganglion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); however, operative and histologic examination identified the swelling as an ancient schwannoma. Ancient schwannomas mostly present as a solitary tumor. A lobulated tumor in this location has not been described previously. The pathologic findings of these uncommon tumors and the difficulties encountered in accurate preoperative diagnosis are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/8. median nerve palsy after operative treatment of olecranon fracture.

    Olecranon fracture is not an uncommon fracture in clinical practice. Simple olecranon fracture usually heals quite well without any types of iatrogenic complications. Despite close proximity of the fracture to the nerve, median nerve palsy after operative treatment of olecranon fracture is a rare complication. To the authors' knowledge, this complication has not been previously reported in the Thai or English literature. The authors present a patient who had median nerve palsy after tension-band wiring for olecranon fixation. Intraoperative finding revealed that the median nerve was injured by the tip of K-wire. While this complication is uncommon on a per-person basis, it may results in serious complication, such as nerve palsy or limb ischemia. Orthopedic surgeons must remain vigilant with regard to any type of internal fixation in the upper extremity because the risk of neurovascular injury is high.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Median Neuropathy'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.