Cases reported "Meningeal Neoplasms"

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1/419. hemangioblastoma mimicking tentorial meningioma: preoperative embolization of the meningeal arterial blood supply--case report.

    A 72-year-old male presented with a primary hemangioblastoma of the posterior fossa with unusual dural attachment and meningeal arterial blood supply from the external carotid artery and marginal tentorial artery. Preoperative embolization facilitated complete resection of the tumor with no resultant neurological deficit. hemangioblastoma must be included in the differential diagnosis of tumors with dural involvement. Preoperative embolization is very useful in such tumors.
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2/419. lung carcinoma presenting as metastasis to intracranial meningioma: case report and review of the literature.

    Tumor-to-tumor metastasis is rare. The authors report a case of a 52-year-old man with a 1-year history of a right parasaggital meningioma, whose clinical signs were consistent with enlarging meningioma. In preparation for surgery, the routine preoperative chest radiograph revealed a lung mass. Fine-needle aspiration of the mass revealed adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent surgical excision of the intracranial mass, which was thought to be a meningioma. However, pathologic examination revealed a transitional meningioma extensively infiltrated with deposits of metastatic carcinoma from the patient's primary lung tumor. Metastasis to meningioma was therefore responsible for the rapid enlargement of the long-standing meningioma, and caused the first clinical manifestation of primary lung carcinoma. Recurrent metastasis developed at the surgical site 5 weeks later, requiring surgical excision and postoperative radiation to prevent further recurrence. This is a highly unusual presentation for lung carcinoma and, to the authors' best knowledge, is the first such case reported. A review of the published literature revealed 20 other cases of lung carcinoma metastatic to meningioma, which were incidentally discovered on surgery or autopsy.
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3/419. Foreign body granuloma mimicking intracranial meningioma: case report and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Intracranial foreign body granulomas are rare. We describe a case of an intracranial foreign body granuloma found in a 17-year-old female patient 9 years after she underwent a craniotomy for a tumor of unknown type. Postoperative imaging of patients who have undergone neurosurgical procedures can often reveal enhancing masses, and foreign body granuloma should be included in the differential diagnosis. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: The patient presented with a history of developmental delay, panhypopituitarism, and chronic headache. Admission resulted from an acute increase in the severity of her headache. INTERVENTION: Imaging studies, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrated a 1.5 x 2 cm round, enhancing anterior interhemispheric mass, appearing to arise from the falx and causing mild mass effect. A nonenhancing cystic mass was also noted in the suprasellar region but was without mass effect. The patient underwent a craniotomy and removal of the anterior mass without complication, and her headache resolved. A pathological examination of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of foreign body granuloma. CONCLUSION: Although rare, foreign body granuloma should be included in the differential diagnosis of previously operated intracranial masses. The importance of accurate historical information and guidelines that may assist in diagnosis are discussed.
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4/419. Primary lymphoma of Meckel's cave mimicking trigeminal schwannoma: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: We report the first case of primary lymphoma of Meckel's cave. The ability of a lymphoma to mimic a trigeminal schwannoma, both clinically and radiographically, resulted in misdiagnosis and flawed surgical strategy. We discuss the characteristics of a Meckel's cave lymphoma on magnetic resonance images, the predisposing medical conditions that should cause the neurosurgeon to add lymphoma to the normal differential diagnosis, and appropriate management strategies. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 40-year-old African-American woman presented with a 5-month history of progressive facial numbness and pain in all three divisions of the left trigeminal nerve. magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the left side of Meckel's cave, with extension into the lateral compartment of the cavernous sinus, without encasement of the internal carotid artery, through the foramen rotundum into the posterior aspect of the maxillary sinus, and through the foramen ovale into the pterygopalatine fossa. The diagnosis, based on clinical history and radiographic imaging, was schwannoma of Meckel's cave. The patient had a history of systemic lupus erythematosus that had been treated with intermittent steroid therapy. INTERVENTION: The surgical approach selected was a frontotemporal craniotomy with orbitozygomatic osteotomy and anterior petrosectomy. The lesion was totally excised, although the gross intraoperative appearance of the lesion was inconsistent with the preoperative diagnosis, and the pathological examination was unable to establish a histological diagnosis on the basis of frozen sections. Histological diagnosis was confirmed on permanent section after surgery as B-cell lymphoma. Evaluation for other primary sites produced negative results. The patient was then treated with cyclophosphamide (Cytotoxan; Bristol-Myers Oncology, Princeton, NJ), doxorubicin (Adriamycin; Pharmacia & Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI), vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy every 3 weeks for six cycles and then by radiation therapy to the affected area. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of lymphoma should be considered for lesions affecting Meckel's cave in high-risk immunocompromised patients. The presence of an apparent dural tail in an otherwise typical schwannoma is the distinguishing characteristic of a lymphoma. The absence of hyperostosis helps differentiate it from a meningioma. At this point, the preferred surgical strategy is biopsy for diagnosis and then radiotherapy and chemotherapy rather than major cranial base surgery for total resection.
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5/419. Propionibacterium as a cause of postneurosurgical infection in patients with dural allografts: report of three cases.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Although propionibacterium acnes is a common inhabitant of human skin, it is an uncommon pathogen in postoperative infections. We report three cases of postoperative wound infection/osteomyelitis caused by P. acnes. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Three patients underwent craniotomy for a supratentorial meningioma and had a dural allograft at the time of closure. The patients presented several weeks after surgery with clinical evidence of a wound infection. INTERVENTION: All patients were diagnosed with P. acnes infection and treated for this pathogen with appropriate antibiotics. The bone flap was removed in two patients. After antibiotic therapy, all patients demonstrated no further evidence of infection. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first published report of P. acnes infection in patients with a dural substitute. The source of infection cannot be confidently ascertained; however, two patients had strains of P. acnes from one brand of graft, which were indistinguishable by pulsed field gel electrophoresis typing.
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6/419. Dorsum sellae meningioma mimicking pituitary macroadenoma: case report.

    BACKGROUND: A dorsum sellae meningioma is a rare occurrence. It is difficult to evaluate dorsum sellae meningiomas preoperatively from the viewpoint of neuroimaging. We report a rare case of dorsum sellae meningioma mimicking pituitary macroadenoma in a 73-year-old woman. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient presented with bitemporal hemianopsia and panhypopituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a bright, homogeneously enhancing intra- and suprasellar mass and a hypointense region in this mass, which was interpreted as a dorsum sellae. Transsphenoidal extirpation was used because of a suspicion of nonsecreting pituitary macroadenoma. Histopathologically, the tumor was diagnosed as a meningioma. Superselective external carotid angiography before the second surgery revealed that the mass was supplied by the left accessory middle meningeal artery and appeared to originate from dorsum sellae. After preoperative embolization, the patient developed hyponatremia. The tumor was subtotally removed via a transcranial route, and the attachment to the dorsum sellae was coagulated extensively. She did well after a second surgical procedure. CONCLUSION: These radiologic findings may be useful in differentiating dorsum sellae meningioma from pituitary macroadenoma.
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7/419. Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis (Cobb syndrome) with tethered cord.

    A newborn presented with a skin-covered lumbar mass with a subcutaneous hemangioma and on a magnetic resonance image (MRI) revealed a tethered spinal cord with a local mass. The mass had signal characteristics compatible with a lipoma. An initial diagnosis of a lipomeningocele with tethered cord was made, and the patient underwent surgical exploration and subtotal resection of the mass. A follow-up MRI revealed that the cord was still tethered, but an additional mass was present. The initial mass with signal characteristics of lipomatous tissue was accompanied by a low-signal mass in the lumbosacral canal, ventral to the cord, and bilateral enlargement of the foramina at the lumbosacral level. Because of a concern for an intraspinal tumor, a second operative intervention was performed. Multiple biopsies of the mass inside the spinal cord, the nerve roots and at the level of the foramina revealed angiomas that had similar pathology in all the specimens. A partial resection of the masses and a release of the tethered cord was performed by sectioning the thickened filum terminale. The diagnosis of Cobb's syndrome was made. The unique association of a tethered cord and the Cobb syndrome is reported here.
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8/419. Intraventricular meningiomas: MR imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in two cases.

    CT, MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, and angiography were performed in two men (ages 21 and 48, respectively) with intraventricular meningioma. In both cases, CT and MR imaging showed large tumors located in the trigone of the right lateral ventricle that enhanced intensely after contrast administration. MR spectroscopy was helpful in supporting a preoperative diagnosis of meningioma in both cases.
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9/419. Development of postoperative fibromatosis after resection of an intraspinal meningioma. Case report.

    The authors report the case of an adult female patient who developed a paraspinous thoracic fibromatosis (desmoid tumor) after undergoing resection of an intraspinal thoracic meningioma that was complicated by postoperative wound infection. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of such a tumor occurring after resection of a spinal meningioma. awareness of the development of postoperative fibromatosis and recognition of its association with wound sepsis is important. Although rare, this distinctive lesion should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the apparent rapid regrowth of otherwise indolent lesions including meningioma.
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10/419. End-to-end anastomosis of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery before excision of a meningioma involving the lower clivus and the foramen magnum. Case report.

    BACKGROUND: Petroclival and foramen magnum meningiomas sometimes encase the vertebrobasilar arterial system. magnetic resonance imaging can clearly reveal such encasement. The case presented here was of a meningioma involving the lower clivus and the foramen magnum, encasing a lateral segment of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (pica), despite the fact that no definitive diagnosis of the encasement of the pica was made on preoperative radiological examination. End-to-end anastomosis of the pica was necessary before excision of the tumor. methods: A 55-year-old woman presented with complaints of headache and numbness of the right upper extremity. gadolinium diethylene-thiamine-pentaacetic acid enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images showed a homogeneously enhanced mass lesion involving the lower clivus and the foramen magnum. Direct surgery was then performed, and the lateral medullary segment of the left pica was found to be encased by the tumor. End-to-end anastomosis was performed using No. 10-0 interrupted monofilament nylon sutures. Total removal of the tumor was performed after completion of the anastomosis. The patient was free of neurological abnormalities and no recurrence of tumor was found during a 2-year follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: Revascularization is sometimes thought to be required for resection of craniospinal meningiomas even when they do not appear to encase the vertebro-basilar arterial system on preoperative MR imaging and cerebral angiograms. In the present case, dissection of the pica from the tumor was attempted, but was difficult due to tight encasement of the pica by the tumor.
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