Cases reported "Meningeal Neoplasms"

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1/204. Multiple skull base meningioma: case report.

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of multiple skull base meningiomas varies from 1 to 3% in different series. skull base meningiomas are rare. The pathogenetic role of low-dose radiation seems to be fairly well established in the oncogenesis of meningiomas. Calvarial location and multiplicity seem to be among the distinctive features of radiation-induced meningiomas. skull base location is a very rare occurrence, mainly because the path of irradiation does not significantly involve this region. CASE REPORT: We describe a rare case of simultaneous occurrence of two skull base meningiomas in a 66-year-old female. This patient underwent low-dose irradiation for tinea capitis when she was 8 years old. The patient complained of nuchal pain, paresthesias in both hands, and progressive weakness on her right side. She was admitted to the hospital in September 1994. An MRI showed two masses, one located at the level of the tuberculum sellae and the other at the foramen magnum. These seemed very likely to be multiple meningiomas. The latter lesion, which was more symptomatic and dangerous, was operated on first. Six months later, elective treatment of the suprasellar meningioma was performed with success. CONCLUSION: The actual role of previous head irradiation in the oncogenesis of the present meningiomas remains somewhat unclear. Proper management and judicious use of skull base surgery techniques were key factors in the successful treatment of the patient.
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ranking = 1
keywords = radiation-induced
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2/204. Clear cell meningioma of the lumbo-sacral spine with chordoid features.

    Clear cell meningioma (CCM) is a peculiar variant that differs from conventional meningioma in affecting younger patients, arising more often in spinal or cerebellopontine locations, and showing a higher recurrence rate. Classical meningothelial areas are scarce in these tumors and the differential diagnosis with other neoplasms, particularly metastatic carcinoma, is often difficult. We report a case of clear cell meningioma from the lumbosacral spine in which location, radiologic presentation, light microscopic appearance in initial sampling, and some of the ultrastructural findings were reminiscent of chordoma. The tumor cells were diffusely positive for vimentin and very focally positive for epithelial membrane antigen. Ultrastructural demonstration of interdigitating cell processes joined by numerous desmosomes confirmed the diagnosis of CCM.
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ranking = 0.060046418989736
keywords = neoplasm
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3/204. Solitary fibrous tumor of the meninges: two new cases and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), a mesenchymal neoplasm originally described in the pleura has been more recently reported to arise in a number of other sites, including the meninges. Nowadays immunohistochemistry facilitates the otherwise problematic differential diagnosis with regard to other benign and malignant spindle cell neoplasms of the central nervous system. methods: Two recently treated cases of meningeal SFT (one craniospinal, one spinal) are presented and discussed in the light of the present knowledge and a review of the literature. RESULTS: Total resection was followed by complete recovery and both patients are presently asymptomatic and without evidence of disease. The microscopic and immunohistochemical profiles (CD 34, vimentin positive; S-100, EMA negative) were consistent with those of previously reported cases. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of SFTs behave in a benign fashion and do not recur unless subtotally resected. Malignant variants may account for up to 37% of SFTs in other locations but have never been reported to occur in the meninges. Meningeal SFTs are to be considered a new pathological entity. Wider use of immunohistochemical screening should enable the determination of their real incidence; larger series and longer follow-up will provide conclusions about their treatment and prognosis.
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ranking = 0.12009283797947
keywords = neoplasm
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4/204. Collecting duct meningeal carcinomatosis.

    Collecting duct carcinoma (CDC) is an aggressive primary renal neoplasm that represents a distinct subtype of renal cell carcinoma. Histochemical (eg, mucicarmine) and immunohistochemical (eg, ulex europaeus) studies, taken in concert with the gross and histologic findings, allow differentiation of CDC from the conventional varieties of renal cell carcinoma in most cases. Collecting duct carcinoma generally pursues a more aggressive course than conventional renal cell carcinoma. Metastases to regional lymph nodes, bone, adrenal glands, lung, and skin have been reported in CDC. We describe the case of a 26-year-old man who presented with a clinical and radiologic impression of multifocal meningioma. Biopsies of the meninges and extracranial soft tissues revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma; subsequent studies suggested metastatic CDC. Ultrasound-guided biopsy was performed on a subsequently identified renal mass, which showed features consistent with CDC. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of meningeal carcinomatosis due to CDC. The diagnostic features of this tumor are discussed.
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ranking = 0.060046418989736
keywords = neoplasm
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5/204. Case of the month: March 1999--A 26 year old hiv positive male with dura based masses.

    A 26-year-old male with AIDS presented with a chief complaint of headaches and neck pain. An MRI revealed two enhancing extra-axial dura based masses, one in the area of the left sphenoid wing and one at the level of C2-3. In both cases, microscopic sections showed actin positive spindle cell neoplasms with long slender nuclei, consistent with leiomyomas. Both tumors were positive for Epstein Barr virus by in situ hybridization. This case report serves to emphasize the importance of considering soft tissue tumors such as leiomyoma in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions that occur in the central nervous system in AIDS and discusses the role of EBV in tumorigenesis.
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ranking = 0.060046418989736
keywords = neoplasm
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6/204. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma associated with Goldenhar's syndrome.

    Goldenhar's syndrome is characterised by bony abnormalities of the face, jaw and vertebral column. We report the first case of the development of a primary malignant neoplasm (mesenchymal chondrosarcoma) initially misdiagnosed as a meningioma, occurring in association with this syndrome.
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ranking = 0.060046418989736
keywords = neoplasm
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7/204. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-positive primary effusion lymphoma arising in the subarachnoid space.

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare and distinctive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) that occurs primarily, although not exclusively, in patients with AIDS. It usually develops as a lymphomatous effusion in the absence of a tumor mass, characteristically contains the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 (KSHV/HHV-8), usually also contains the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), displays a characteristic cytomorphology bridging immunoblastic and anaplastic large cell lymphoma, often expresses an indeterminate immunophenotype, and a B-cell genotype. Thus far, PEL has been limited almost entirely to the pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial cavities. We describe a NHL occurring in a gay man with AIDS that is typical of PEL in that it arose in a body cavity or space without an associated tumor mass, displays the cytomorphology typical of PEL, is a clonal B-cell neoplasm, and contains KSHV as well as EBV. This case is singularly distinctive in that it is the first case of PEL reported to arise in the subarachnoid space. This unique case further supports the strong association between KSHV and malignant lymphoma arising in body cavities and growing as an effusion.
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ranking = 0.060046418989736
keywords = neoplasm
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8/204. Hematologic neoplasia and the central nervous system.

    central nervous system (CNS) involvement with malignant cells is a well recognized complication of hematologic neoplasms. A number of disorders such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia and high grade lymphoma frequently involve the CNS and prophylactic therapy is advised. Disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and multiple myeloma are less likely to be associated with CNS involvement. This series describes three cases of CNS involvement by malignant hematologic disease: myelomatous meningitis, CNS chloromas complicating AML, and primary lymphomatous meningitis.
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ranking = 0.060046418989736
keywords = neoplasm
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9/204. Spontaneous epidural haematoma associated with radiation-induced malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

    We report a case of spontaneous epidural haemorrhage associated with metastatic radiation-induced malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the dural meninges in a patient who had been previously treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with radiotherapy.
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ranking = 5
keywords = radiation-induced
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10/204. granular cell tumor of intracranial meninges.

    BACKGROUND: granular cell tumor (GCT) is a benign neoplasm composed of a proliferation of round or polygonal cells that contain eosinophilic granular cytoplasm. The most common locations are tongue and subcutaneous tissue, but a variety of other sites may be involved including the central nervous system (CNS). Most CNS GCT arise in the pituitary, but rare cases involving brain and leptomeninges have been described. Extracranial GCT are usually S-100-positive, but those of the CNS, as well as the congenital variant of GCT, can be S-100-negative. CASE REPORT: We report an incidental autopsy finding of a 2.5 mm GCT that arose in the intracranial meninges overlying the anterior superior cerebellar vermis. RESULTS: The neoplasm had abundant eosinophilic, granular cytoplasm that was PAS-positive and diastase-resistant. Immunohistochemical studies showed that the neoplasm was positive for CD68 and negative for S-100, GFAP, EMA, and keratin. Thus, the immunophenotype is consistent with non-neural origin. CONCLUSION: Although this lesion in this circumstance was of no clinical significance, knowledge of the occurrence of GCT at this site broadens the differential diagnosis of eosinophilic lesions of the leptomeninges.
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ranking = 0.18013925696921
keywords = neoplasm
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