Cases reported "Meningeal Neoplasms"

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1/188. Biomodel-guided stereotaxy.

    OBJECTIVES: To simplify the practice of stereotactic surgery by using an original method, apparatus, and solid anatomic replica for trajectory planning and to validate the method and apparatus in a laboratory and clinical trial. methods: The patient is marked with fiducials and scanned by using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The three-dimensional data are converted to a format acceptable to stereolithography. Stereolithography uses a laser to polymerize photosensitive resin into a solid plastic model (biomodel). Stereolithography can replicate blood vessels, soft tissue, tumor, and bone accurately (<0.8 mm). A stereotactic apparatus is referenced to fiducials replicated in the biomodel. The trajectory for the intervention is determined and saved. The apparatus is attached to the patient fiducials, and the intervention is replicated. RESULTS: Three types of apparatus (template, Brown-Roberts-Wells frame, and D'Urso frame) were tested on phantoms and patients requiring the excision/biopsy of tumors. The localization errors determined from the phantom studies were template, 0.82 mm; Brown-Roberts-Wells frame, 1.17 mm; and D'Urso frame, 0.89 mm. The surgeons reported that clinical use of the template and D'Urso frame was accurate and ergonomic. The Brown-Roberts-Wells frame was more difficult to use and somewhat inaccurate. CONCLUSION: Biomodel-guided stereotaxy has significant advantages. It is performed quickly; it is based on simple, intuitive methodology; it enhances visualization of anatomy and trajectory planning; it enhances patient understanding; it uses inexpensive equipment; it does not require rigid head fixation; and it has greater versatility than known techniques. Disadvantages are biomodel cost and a manufacturing time of 12 to 24 hours.
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keywords = visual
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2/188. meningioma with meningioangiomatosis: a condition mimicking invasive meningiomas in children and young adults: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Meningioangiomatosis is a malformative meningovascular proliferation that occurs sporadically and in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2. Its histologic features of perivascular proliferation of elongated fibroblast and meningothelial cells trapping islands of gliotic cortex may be erroneously interpreted as invasion when an overlying meningioma is present. We report two cases of meningioangiomatosis associated with meningioma and review the literature on the subject for a total of six cases. The age of patients ranged from 9 months to 33 years. All cases were single lesions, and none had clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis type 2. Meningiomas in children have been regarded as having more aggressive behavior than their adult counterparts, with more frequent invasion of the underlying brain. The lack of correlation between brain invasion and recurrence observed in series of meningiomas in young patients may suggest that some of these lesions are meningioangiomatosis associated with meningioma rather than invasive meningiomas.
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ranking = 0.99765285845493
keywords = cortex
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3/188. Leptomeningeal melanoma and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    A 78-year-old woman with known chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) was admitted to a psychiatric unit because of rapidly declining cognitive function. Clinical examination also revealed cerebellar signs and she later became akinetic and mute. She deteriorated and died of bronchopneumonia. The histology from the post-mortem confirmed the presence of CLL in the lymph nodes and she was also found to have diffuse leptomeningeal melanoma. In addition, there was extensive prion protein deposition in the cerebral cortex, but without significant spongiosis. The astrocytosis that was present appeared superficial only. Furthermore, prion protein appeared to be co-expressed with betaA4 in the form of plaques. The patient therefore had evidence of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in addition to meningeal melanoma and CLL. This case further illustrates the importance of employing prion protein immunohistochemistry in suspected cases of CJD, especially where the histology is atypical.
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ranking = 0.99765285845493
keywords = cortex
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4/188. Long-term magnetic resonance imaging follow-up of asymptomatic sellar tumors. -- their natural history and surgical indications.

    Serial magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical symptoms were analyzed in 23 patients with sellar lesions, who were followed up without initial therapy for mass reduction to evaluate their natural history and surgical indication for these lesions. The patients were aged 17 to 78 years (mean 47.3 years) and the follow-up period was 1.5 to 11.6 years (mean 5.1 years). Lesions were divided into two types based on the MR imaging findings, regardless of their histological types. Type C was cystic with or without enhancement of the smooth and thin wall. Type S had enhanced solid components. Ten patients had Type C tumors. Three patients presented with sudden onset of headache. The tumor size spontaneously decreased with intensity change, indicating pituitary apoplexy as the trigger of the onset and intensity change. Four patients presented with the visual disturbance which improved with the reduction of tumor size, but three patients deteriorated and required surgery. The operation revealed Rathke's cleft cyst. The remaining three patients were found incidentally and have been asymptomatic without MR imaging changes. Thirteen patients had Type S tumors. Six patients of nine with 14 mm or larger tumors developed symptomatic tumor enlargement over the follow-up period of 1.2 to 8.6 years (mean 4.9 years) and required treatment. The remainder showed no change. Type C tumors frequently shrink or even disappear spontaneously. We can justify conservative follow-up of Type C tumors in patients with no or only transient symptoms. Type S tumors, larger than 14 mm in size, need closer observation or treatment because they often enlarge and become symptomatic.
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keywords = visual
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5/188. Melanocytoma of the left optic nerve head and right retrobulbar optic neuropathy compressed by a tuberculum sellae meningioma.

    A 40-year-old woman had a highly pigmented, slightly elevated tumor on the left optic disc. She had no visual disturbance in the left eye. The tumor was stationary for 5 years. At age 45 years, she complained of decreased visual acuity in the right eye. magnetic resonance imaging showed a right-shifted homogeneous lesion at the tuberculum sellae. Histopathologic study of the excised lesion revealed interlacing bundles of spindle-shaped fibroblast-like cells with whorl formation. We believe that a relationship between melanocytoma of the optic nerve head and a tuberculum sellae meningioma may exist rather than a chance occurrence, as previously suggested by others.
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ranking = 2
keywords = visual
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6/188. Treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma with three-dimensional conformal radiation.

    PURPOSE: To report a patient recovering vision after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for optic nerve sheath meningioma. methods: radiotherapy was delivered by a three-dimensional conformal technique in 28-180-cGy fractions. RESULTS: visual acuity improved from 20/200 to 20/30, and the visual field defect resolved. CONCLUSION: Visual loss from optic nerve sheath meningioma can be reversed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = visual
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7/188. Myelomatous involvement of the dura mater: a rare complication of multiple myeloma.

    A case of myelomatous involvement of the dura mater is reported. The patient presented with blurring of vision in the right visual field and left sided facial numbness. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of the head revealed extensive infiltration of the dura mater. cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed no plasmacytosis and although there was a raised CSF protein concentration, no paraprotein band was detected, despite the presence of serum paraprotein. The infiltration of the dura mater is likely to have arisen by spread from contiguous bone lesions, contrasting with the pattern of spread seen in myelomatous involvement of the leptomeninges, which probably occurs through haematogenous seeding of the meninges. Leptomeningeal involvement is associated with a very poor prognosis; however, this patient had a favourable response to combined chemotherapy and cranial radiotherapy, suggesting that myelomatous involvement of the dura mater should be considered as a distinct complication of myeloma.
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ranking = 1
keywords = visual
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8/188. Chemotherapy-induced complete regression of choroidal metastases and subsequent isolated leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in advanced breast cancer: a case report and literature review.

    Choroidal metastases from breast cancer represent an unusual metastatic presentation that has been traditionally treated with radiation therapy. Herein, we report a case of metastatic breast cancer presenting with pulmonary, cutaneous, lymph node and symptomatic choroidal metastases treated with systemic combination chemotherapy incorporating docetaxel and mitoxantrone without induction or consolidation radiation therapy to control visual symptoms from choroidal metastases. The patient experienced a durable complete remission in all metastatic sites that was maintained for 21 months since the initiation of chemotherapy, afterwhich she developed isolated leptomeningeal carcinomatosis managed successfully with intensive intrathecal methotrexate and whole brain irradiation leading to a new complete remission maintained until this report; 11 months after its presentation. This is the first case to our knowledge reporting complete regression of choroidal metastases with docetaxel-based chemotherapy as the only treatment modality and subsequent isolated leptomeningeal carcinomatosis recurrence.
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keywords = visual
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9/188. Surgical strategy for meningioma extension into the optic canal.

    neuroimaging of the extension of meningioma into the optic canal was evaluated for planning the surgical strategy. Intracanalicular extension and localization were retrospectively analyzed in 13 patients with frontal base meningioma near the optic canal, based on the findings of visual field defects, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and surgical observations. MR imaging confirmed intracanalicular localization in one of three patients with tumors extending into the optic canals, and indicated the tumor in the others. The visual field defect did not precisely correspond to the tumor localization. Unroofing of the optic canal was performed in four patients and no adverse effects were observed. The interhemispheric approach was employed for tumors localized medially in the canal, and the pterional approach for tumors localized laterally. MR imaging is useful to evaluate the intracanalicular extension, but aggressive confirmation during surgery is essential. Tailored unroofing of the optic canal and removal of the intracanalicular tumor can be performed with few adverse effects and results in good tumor control.
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ranking = 2
keywords = visual
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10/188. Solitary fibrous tumor arising from the falx cerebri--case report.

    A 50-year-old female was admitted with headache and visual disturbance. neuroimaging demonstrated a well-demarcated large tumor attached to the falx cerebri. The tumor was totally removed by surgery. Histological examination showed that the tumor consisted of spindle cells with no pattern in the collagenous background. Staghorn-like blood vessels were common. Immunohistochemical study showed the tumor cells were strongly positive for CD34 and vimentin, but negative for epithelial membrane antigen. The diagnosis was solitary fibrous tumor arising from the falx cerebri. Solitary fibrous tumor is rare within the cranial cavity, and can be distinguished from meningioma and hemangiopericytoma by the histological, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical findings.
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keywords = visual
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