Cases reported "Meningioma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/285. meningioma of the cavernous sinus in a child.

    Intracranial meningiomas in children are rare, representing 1-4.2% of central nervous system tumors and 1.5-1.8% of all intracranial meningiomas. Meningiomas arising from the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus account for less than 1% of all intracranial meningiomas. To our knowledge, only one case of a meningioma arising from the cavernous sinus has been reported in childhood. A 6-year-old boy presented with left ophthalmoplegia. A slight drooping of the left eyelid was noted at the age of 1 year. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast administration revealed an enhancing mass lesion located in the left cavernous sinus. The tumor, arising from the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus, was totally removed and the oculomotor nerve was reconstructed with a sural nerve graft. MRI displayed total tumor removal 1 month after the surgery. The pathological diagnosis was of a psammomatous meningioma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/285. choroid plexus papilloma of cerebellopontine angle with extension to foramen magnum.

    A case of choroid plexus papilloma resembling meningioma of cerebellopontine (CP) angle with its extension to foramen magnum is presented. Occurrence of this tumour in CP angle is very rare. Its extension towards foramen magnum is further rare. It was a real diagnostic enigma preoperatively as the tumour was resembling meningioma upto some extent on radiological study. Retromastoid craniectomy with microsurgical excision of tumour and its extension was achieved in toto. Tumour was attached to few rootlets of lower cranial nerves which were preserved. Attachment of the tumour with lower cranial nerves again caused diagnostic confusion with neurofibroma intraoperatively.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/285. Intraspinal osteogenic meningioma: report of a case.

    Dense calcification and psammomatous bodies are common in spinal meningioma, but are rarely reported in osteogenic meningioma. We present a 73-year-old woman with an extramedullary, intradural tumor located at the T5 vertebra. The tumor showed mixed intensity and heterogeneous enhancement on the T1-weighted image and hypointensity on the T2-weighted image, and was situated near the spinal nerve root. The tumor's initial symptom was myelopathy, as is usual with spinal meningioma. We successfully removed the tumor under microscopy and found it to be separated from the vertebral column by the epidural space. The symptoms and signs improved gradually after the operation. Because the pathologic examination revealed areas of lamellar bone with bone marrow in the transitional meningioma, and because these were not related to the psammomatous bodies, osteogenic meningioma was diagnosed. metaplasia of arachnoid cells is considered to be the putative etiology of osteogenic meningioma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/285. Removal of petrous apex meningioma and microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia through the anterior petrosal approach. Case report.

    A 64-year-old female presented with right trigeminal neuralgia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a tumor attached to the right petrous apex. MR imaging also revealed that the trigeminal nerve was compressed and distorted by the tumor. Tumor removal and microvascular decompression (MVD) were performed via the anterior petrosal approach. The trigeminal nerve was distorted by the tumor and the superior cerebellar artery compressed the medial part of the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve. The surgery resulted in complete relief of the trigeminal neuralgia. Posterior fossa tumors causing ipsilateral trigeminal neuralgia are not rare, and are often removed via the suboccipital retromastoid approach, as MVD for trigeminal neuralgia is usually performed through the retromastoid approach. The advantages of the anterior petrosal approach are shorter access to the lesion and direct exposure without interference from the cranial nerves, and that bleeding from the tumors is easily controlled as the feeding arteries can be managed in the early stage of the surgery. We conclude that the anterior petrosal approach is safe and advantageous for the removal of petrous apex tumor associated with trigeminal neuralgia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/285. A new approach to an old problem.

    A patient with progressive visual loss was found to have an optic nerve sheath meningioma. The patient was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy, a computer-guided stereotactic technique that minimizes the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy. Six months after treatment, the patient was doing well and showed no signs of radiation-induced optic neuropathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/285. Melanocytoma of the left optic nerve head and right retrobulbar optic neuropathy compressed by a tuberculum sellae meningioma.

    A 40-year-old woman had a highly pigmented, slightly elevated tumor on the left optic disc. She had no visual disturbance in the left eye. The tumor was stationary for 5 years. At age 45 years, she complained of decreased visual acuity in the right eye. magnetic resonance imaging showed a right-shifted homogeneous lesion at the tuberculum sellae. Histopathologic study of the excised lesion revealed interlacing bundles of spindle-shaped fibroblast-like cells with whorl formation. We believe that a relationship between melanocytoma of the optic nerve head and a tuberculum sellae meningioma may exist rather than a chance occurrence, as previously suggested by others.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/285. Neurotologic follow-up after radiation of posterior fossa tumors.

    OBJECTIVE: Stereotactic radiation treatment, also known as gamma knife surgery or radiosurgery, has come into acceptance as a treatment alternative to surgical removal for posterior fossa tumors. The purpose of this article is to describe the role of the neurotologist in the optimal management of neurotologic complications after stereotactic radiation, as illustrated by five patients. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. patients: Five patients who underwent stereotactic radiation of posterior fossa tumors. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presence or absence of neurotologic complications (tumor growth, hearing loss, imbalance/ataxia, vertigo, and facial paralysis) or neurosurgical complaints (facial numbness, motor weakness, headache, hydrocephalus, and subarachnoid cysts). RESULTS: Postradiation neurotologic complaints included vertigo, imbalance/ataxia, and progressive hearing loss in four of the five patients. Continued tumor growth occurred in two patients; two patients had no growth; in one patient the tumor became smaller. The complications of facial nerve paralysis, facial numbness, motor weakness, headache, hydrocephalus, cerebellar edema, and posterior fossa arachnoid cyst formation occurred less frequently. CONCLUSIONS: Stereotactic radiation of posterior fossa tumors can produce significant neurotologic problems. It is imperative that neurotologists remain involved in the follow-up care of patients with posterior fossa tumors to offer optimal treatment alternatives for the neurotologic disorders.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/285. Sphenoid wing meningioma--an unusual cause of duro-optic calcification.

    Sphenoid ridge is the third commonest site of intracranial meningiomas. Although sphenoid ridge meningiomas often involve the optic canal, calcification along the optic nerve has not been reported with these tumors. We describe CT features of a calcified optic nerve in a patient with a calcified sphenoid ridge meningioma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/285. meningioma of the internal auditory canal with extension into the vestibule.

    Meningiomas account for approximately 18 to 19 per cent of all brain tumours. Although they can arise in numerous locations, meningiomas of the internal auditory canal (IAC) are rare. Most tumours that originate in the IAC are schwannomas of the VIIIth cranial nerve (acoustic neuromas). We report a case of a meningioma which appears to originate from the IAC and extends into the vestibule. The clinical findings and the radiographical features of meningiomas of the IAC are similar to those of acoustic neuromas. Pre-operative differentiation between acoustic neuromas and meningiomas of the IAC may be difficult.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/285. The transcochlear approach to the skull base.

    A new approach to tumors of the skull base is described. This approach is accomplished by forward extension of the translabyrinthine opening into the cerebellopontine angle. The facial nerve is mobilized in the temporal bone from the stylomastoid foramen to its entrance into the internal auditory canal. Having removed the barrier of the facial nerve, additional bone removal can be carried forward to the internal carotid artery, which now becomes the forward limit for temporal bone resection. The access attained through this exposure allows removal of tumors arising from the petrous tip, as well as tumors arising directly from the clivus. We provide the case histories of four patients in whom this approach was successfully used in removal of skull base tumors.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Meningioma'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.