Cases reported "Meningitis, Bacterial"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/9. Systemic brucellosis with chronic meningitis: A case report.

    A young adult presenting with 11 months history of fever, headache, vomiting was found to have CSF lymphocytic pleocytosis with increased protein. His serum tested strongly positive for Brucella (standard tube agglutination titre 1: 320) whereas CSF was weakly positive. He became asymptomatic on treatment with tetracycline, rifampicin and streptomycin with significant CSF response. This case is reported because of its rarity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agglutination
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/9. streptococcus agalactiae meningitis in adults: report of two cases.

    Two cases of streptococcus agalactiae meningitis in adults are reported. The first patient was a 40-year-old man who presented with acute fever, headache, stiffness of the neck and confusion. During treatment, he developed left hemiparesis from cerebral infarction and bilateral deafness. The other was an 80-year-old man who presented with acute confusion and stiffness of the neck. During treatment, he developed septic shock and generalized tonic-clonic convulsions. diagnosis was established by latex agglutination of streptococcus B-antigen and confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid-culture later on. The first patient survived but continued to have deafness whilst the other died from septic shock.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agglutination
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/9. Neurobrucellosis: clinical and therapeutic features.

    Eighteen patients with neurobrucellosis are described. Eleven patients had meningitis alone or with papilledema, optic neuropathy, or radiculopathy. Four patients had meningovascular complications manifested by stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage from a presumed mycotic aneurysm. Two patients had parenchymatous dysfunction, including a child who had a cerebellar syndrome without evidence of direct infection of the central nervous system. One patient presented with polyradiculopathy. Twelve of 16 patients had pleocytosis; none had cell counts greater than 419 x 10(6)/L. Most patients had hypoglycorrhachia and elevated levels of protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Results of an agglutination test for Brucella in serum were positive for all patients. Six of 16 patients had positive blood cultures, and four of 14 had positive CSF cultures. Antimicrobial treatment included concurrent administration of two or more of the following drugs: streptomycin, tetracycline (or doxycycline), rifampin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Eleven patients fully recovered. Five patients were left with residual neurological deficits. Four of these patients suffered permanent hearing loss, one of whom also had significant loss of vision in one eye. One elderly senile patient with meningovascular brucellosis remained in a vegetative state despite receiving antimicrobial therapy for 6 months. One patient died due to rupture of a mycotic aneurysm within 7 days of initiation of therapy. One other patient was treated after sustaining an intracerebral hemorrhage, but this patient's condition was diagnosed only after discharge.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agglutination
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/9. Acute severe spinal cord dysfunction in a child with meningitis: streptococcus pneumoniae and mycoplasma pneumoniae co-infection.

    Tetraplegia developed abruptly in an 11-y-old with pneumococcal meningitis. magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple hyperintensities at the brainstem-spinal cord junction. Serological tests were positive for mycoplasma pneumoniae (microparticle agglutination and specific IgMs). erythromycin and dexamethasone were started promptly, and 10 d later the patient was discharged with normal neurological function. CONCLUSION: Tetraplegia during the course of pneumococcal meningitis in an 11-y-old girl disappeared after treatment with ceftriaxone, erythromycin and dexamethasone.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agglutination
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/9. Brucella meningitis and papilledema in a child.

    PURPOSE: To report a rare case of Brucella meningitis with papilledema in a child and to discuss the findings of neurobrucellosis in children. methods: A 6-year-old girl was admitted with headache, fever, and vomiting for 1 week. Her family reported intake of raw unpasteurized goat's milk in the past. Meningeal signs were strongly positive. Bilateral moderate optic disc edema with flame-shaped hemorrhages was observed. RESULTS: The diagnosis of Brucella infection was established by positive blood culture for Brucella species, serum agglutination titer of antibodies to Brucella >1:160, and positive CSF culture. After treatment consisting of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, rifampin, and doxycycline, the patient's condition gradually improved. One month later, the papilledema disappeared. One year after presentation, the patient remains free of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Brucella meningitis must be ruled out in symptomatic patients reporting ingestion of raw unpasteurized goat's milk. papilledema is a frequent clinical feature, but irreversible visual impairment is extremely rare.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agglutination
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/9. abducens nerve palsy and optic neuritis as initial manifestation in brucellosis.

    Cranial nerve involvement in brucellosis is rare. We present a case of brucellosis presenting with optic neuritis and abducens nerve palsy on the left side. cerebrospinal fluid findings indicated Brucella meningitis with high protein count, low sugar level and pleocystosis. In addition, Brucella agglutination test (Wright test) was found to be 1/128 in cerebrospinal fluid. serum agglutination test for Brucella was also positive at 1/1280. This case was diagnosed as brucellosis involving optic and abducens nerves. The patient was treated by ceftriaxone (intravenous), rifampicin (orally) and doxycycline (orally). Two months later the patient's vision acuity in the left eye had moderately improved and the patient's left abducens palsy had almost disappeared. In conclusion, cranial nerve involvement in brucellosis can have good prognosis if anti-Brucella treatment is undertaken early.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = agglutination
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/9. Clinical and therapeutic features of childhood neurobrucellosis.

    brucellosis is a multisystem disease with diverse clinical presentations, and involvement of the nervous system is considered to be rare in childhood. Five children with meningitis (n=2), meningoencephalitis (n=1), meningomyelitis (n=1), or cerebellar ataxia (n=1) are described, all of whom had a history of exposure to a possible source of brucellosis. Examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis in 4 patients, high protein concentration in 5 and low glucose concentration in 3. Reciprocal brucella agglutination titers were significantly elevated in serum (> or = 160) and in CSF (> or = 80) of all patients. brucella melitensis was isolated from blood and CSF in one patient, from blood only in 2, and from bone marrow only in another one. All patients were treated successfully by a three-drug combination of streptomycin (4 patients) or doxycycline (one patient) with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and rifampin, and in one patient dexamethasone was also added. In endemic areas, neurobrucellosis should be suspected in the evaluation of patients with unexplained neurologic symptoms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agglutination
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/9. meningitis due to enterotoxigenic bacteroides fragilis.

    An enterotoxigenic strain of bacteroides fragilis was the sole organism isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of a two-and-a-half-month neonate who had a medullary-colonic fistula as part of a complex congenital malformation, but no brain abscess. A rapid latex particle agglutination test for detection of bacterial antigen was positive for haemophilus influenzae type b, suggesting that bacteroides fragilis and haemophilus influenzae type b might share some capsular antigens. In order to determine the role of the enterotoxin with respect to virulence of the strain, antibodies to a 20 kDa protein were sought in the patient's serum, but Western blot of the culture supernatant revealed only antibodies to a 45 kDa bacterial protein. The patient was successfully treated with metronidazole and imipenem.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agglutination
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/9. Streptococcus B meningitis in post-partum.

    We report a case of post-partum meningitis due to group B-streptococcus developing 24 h after vaginal delivery. diagnosis was established by latex agglutination of streptococcus B-antigenes and confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid-culture later on. Clinical and haematological signs of meningitis disappeared after treatment with ampicillin. In a review of the literature we found eight other cases of streptococcal post-partum meningitis. In all of these cases, delivery was vaginal and no antibioprophylaxis was given.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agglutination
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Meningitis, Bacterial'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.