Cases reported "Meningitis, Bacterial"

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1/22. Bacterial complications of strongyloidiasis: streptococcus bovis meningitis.

    We report the case of a 64-year-old veteran who had streptococcus bovis meningitis as a result of a long latent strongyloides infection that became acute when he was treated with prednisone. We reviewed 38 reported cases of serious bacterial infections associated with strongyloidiasis. patients most frequently had nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. Of these 38 patients, 21 (55%) had meningitis, and 28 (73%) had bacteremia that was polymicrobial in 3 cases (8%). Other sites of infection included lung, bone marrow, ascites, mitral valve, and lymph node. Most infections were due to enteric gram-negative bacteria. There is one previously reported case of S bovis meningitis. Thirty-four of the patients (89%) were immunosuppressed; 21 of these (55%) were taking pharmacologic doses of adrenal corticosteroids. Thirty-three of the 38 (87%) patients died. patients with enteric bacterial infection without an obvious cause should be tested for the presence of strongyloidiasis.
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keywords = bovis
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2/22. streptococcus bovis meningitis in an infant.

    streptococcus bovis is a nonenterococcal, group D streptococcus which has been identified as a causative agent for serious human infections, including endocarditis, bacteremia, and septic arthritis. Several cases of adult S. bovis meningitis have been reported, usually in association with underlying disease. In the neonatal period, it is an uncommon agent of meningitis. We report, to our knowledge, the third documented case of neonatal S. bovis meningitis in the English language literature. As in the previous cases, this neonate showed no anatomical or congenital immunologic lesion which might be expected to predispose the patient to meningitis. Sequencing of the 16S ribosomal dna gene was performed and a new PCR test was used to secure a more reliable identification of the strain.
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ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = bovis
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3/22. Use of 16S rRNA sequencing for identification of actinobacillus ureae isolated from a cerebrospinal fluid sample.

    actinobacillus ureae, previously pasteurella ureae, has on rare occasions been described as a cause of human infection. Owing to its rarity, it may not be easily identified in clinical microbiology laboratories by standard tests. This report describes a patient with acute bacterial meningitis due to A. ureae. The identity of the isolate was determined by means of dna sequence analysis of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene.
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ranking = 0.92670165778755
keywords = bacillus
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4/22. streptococcus bovis meningitis in a healthy adult patient.

    We describe the first case in the English language of streptococcus bovis meningitis in a 45-y-old patient without any underlying disease or predisposing condition. S. bovis biotype II was isolated from his spinal fluid and blood. The illness was community-acquired and was clinically and biologically similar to disease caused by the classical meningeal pathogens. The patient was cured after 10 d of therapy with ceftriaxone and, 2.5 y later, is currently healthy. As a result of this case and a similar case published recently in the Spanish literature we conclude that S. bovis should be considered a microorganism capable of causing meningitis in the absence of any underlying condition or clear focus of infection.
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ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = bovis
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5/22. streptococcus bovis meningitis in a neonate with Ivemark syndrome.

    Although streptococcus bovis infections in adults are associated with endocarditis and bowel neoplasms, S. bovis-associated meningitis is rare in neonates. We describe the case of a neonate with Ivemark syndrome, which possibly predisposed her to infection with this bacterium.
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keywords = bovis
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6/22. pasteurella gallinarum neonatal meningitis.

    A 4-day-old baby weighing 1.7 kg was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Ga-Rankuwa Hospital, Pretoria, with a history of apneic attacks. On examination there was an umbilical sepsis and the neonate was septicemic. The baby had been delivered at home and the umbilical cord had been cut by the grandmother using unclean scissors and chimney soot applied to the umbilical stump. On admission, a septic screen was done and antibiotic treatment was started with penicillin and amikacin. The investigations showed that the baby was slightly anemic, with hemoglobin levels of 10.0 g/dL (14.9-23.7 g/dL), and a pure growth of a Gram-negative bacillus was obtained from the cerebrospinal fluid, blood culture and suprapubic aspirate urine specimens. The Gram-negative bacillus was catalase and oxidase positive and it was identified as pasteurella gallinarum. Antimicrobial profiling showed the organism to be susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, gentamicin and amikacin. Despite having received antimicrobial agents to which the etiological agent was susceptible, the neonate died within 5 days of admission. The cause of death was postulated to be due to overwhelming sepsis which resulted in septic shock.
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ranking = 0.37068066311502
keywords = bacillus
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7/22. Neonatal sepsis caused by streptococcus bovis variant (biotype II/2): report of a case and review.

    streptococcus bovis is an uncommon cause of infection in neonates. However, S. bovis is capable of causing fulminant neonatal sepsis or meningitis that is indistinguishable clinically from that caused by group B streptococcus. S. bovis and S. bovis variant (sometimes referred to as S. bovis biotypes I and II, respectively) are phenotypically similar but may be differentiated by expanded testing. In adults, specific associations between disease states and different biotypes of S. bovis are apparent. No data exist on possible differences or clinical relevance of neonatal infection caused by different biotypes or newer species of S. bovis. We report a 3-day-old neonate with bacteremia and meningitis caused by S. bovis variant (S. bovis biotype II/2) and review the literature.
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ranking = 2.1666666666667
keywords = bovis
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8/22. kingella kingae, a rare cause of bacterial meningitis.

    A male adolescent with a history of pharyngitis developed meningitis due to kingella kingae. This is a Gram-negative coccobacillus belonging to the family of neisseriaceae. It is a rarely reported human pathogen, from which only 2 cases of meningitis have been described up to the present day. Our patient developed ophthalmoplegia, suggestive of basal meningitis. He was treated with penicillin g and recovered completely.
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ranking = 0.18534033155751
keywords = bacillus
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9/22. A case of septicaemia, meningitis and pneumonia caused by streptococcus bovis type II.

    We present a case of septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis due to streptococcus bovis type-II in a patient who had undergone a total hip prosthesis under general anaesthesia three weeks earlier. This organism is an uncommon human pathogen that sometimes causes bacteraemia and endocarditis and is usually connected with colon pathology and dental procedures. In the reported case, there were no risk factors for S. bovis infection except for the hip operation. S. bovis type II sensitive to penicillin was isolated from all blood and pleural fluid cultures. The patient recovered and was discharged from hospital two weeks after presentation.
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ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = bovis
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10/22. Fulminant citrobacter meningitis with multiple periventricular abscesses in a three-month-old infant.

    citrobacter, a Gram-negative enteric bacillus, is a rare cause of septicemia and meningitis, seldom reported beyond the neonatal period. It is characterized by a fulminant clinical course and a high incidence of complications, including brain abscesses. We studied a three-month-old infant with citrobacter meningitis, who developed acute communicating hydrocephalus and multiple periventricular brain abscesses while on treatment. The patient died, despite intensive antibiotic treatment directed towards the causative organism, C. diversus.
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ranking = 0.18534033155751
keywords = bacillus
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