Cases reported "Meningitis, Bacterial"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/94. Fatal maternal beta-hemolytic group B streptococcal meningitis: a case report.

    meningitis secondary to beta-hemolytic group B streptococcus is rare and represents less than 1% of cases of adult meningitis. We report the first known case of maternal mortality attributed to beta-hemolytic group B streptococcal meningitis. A 23-year-old African-American woman with a benign prenatal course delivered a viable male infant at term. Labor was complicated by thick meconium for which a saline amnioinfusion was utilized. On postpartum Day 1, the patient complained of right hip pain and a headache. Within 12 hr the patient was comatose with fixed and dilated pupils. life support measures were discontinued secondary to absence of electrocortical activity. Postmortem examination revealed endomyometritis and fulminant meningitis with gram-positive cocci. Placental histologic sections demonstrated acute chorioamnionitis and bateriological cultures noted beta-hemolytic group B streptococcus. The virulence of beta-hemolytic group B streptococcus in the neonate is well recognized. This case demonstrates that beta-hemolytic group B streptococcus is also a potentially fatal maternal pathogen.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/94. Acinetobacter meningitis: four nosocomial cases.

    We report the clinical features and therapeutic outcomes of four patients with multiantibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter meningitis. There were three males and one female, aged from 17 to 49 years. Three of them had suffered from head injuries with skull fractures, and the other suffered from an intracerebral hemorrhage and underwent a craniotomy. All four patients acquired nosocomial Acinetobacter meningitis, and multiantibiotic resistance developed. After treatment with imipenem/cilastatin, three of the four patients survived; one died of multiorgan failure. Because the clinical manifestations of Acinetobacter meningitis are similar to those of other gram-negative bacillary meningitis, the diagnosis can only be confirmed by bacterial culture. Resistance to multiple antibiotics, including third-generation cephalosporins, is frequently seen in patients with nosocomial Acinetobacter meningitis, and imipenem/cilastatin seems to be the antibiotic of choice for this potentially fatal central nervous system infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/94. Group A streptococcal meningitis in the antibiotic era.

    A case of group A streptococcal meningitis is reported and the 51 cases reported in the literature since 1966 reviewed. A total of 24 men and 24 women were included in the study; the mean age ( /-SD) was 20.9 /-25.5 years. Fifty-eight percent of the patients had comorbid conditions, 80% had a distant focus of infection, and 65.8% had blood cultures positive for group A streptococci. Seventy-five per cent of the patients were treated with penicillin. The overall case-fatality rate was 12% (6 patients). Sequelae were more prevalent among children (44%) than among adults (7.7%) (OR=9.43; 95% CI, 1.02-438.95; P=0.03). Group A streptococcus is a rare cause of pyogenic meningitis, affecting mainly children or adults with comorbidity. Although the case-fatality rate is relatively low, neurological sequelae are frequent among survivors, especially children.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/94. streptococcus suis meningitis: report of a case.

    A 50-year-old policeman who presented with subacute meningitis, bilateral rectus muscle palsies, dizziness and early bilateral deafness was reported. cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed polymorphonuclear pleocytosis with gram-positive cocci. blood and CSF cultures grew Streptococcus viridans which subsequently identified to be streptococcus suis. The patient improved after treatment but deafness persisted.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/94. Transient diabetes insipidus following escherichia coli meningitis complicated by ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    Although disorders of ADH secretion associated with meningitis are usually consistent with the Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion (SIADH), central diabetes insipidus (DI) is an exceptional complication of meningitis. Transient DI as a complication of escherichia coli (E. coli) meningitis due to ventriculoperitoneal shunt in an 18-month-old boy is presented. blood and spinal fluid cultures yielded E. coli, sensitive to cefotaxime. The DI arose on the day 3 after admission and continued to the day 20. Treatment comprised cefotaxime, dexamethasone, fluid adjustment and vasopressin. The course of our case supports that in cases of bacterial meningitis, initial fluid restriction may occasionally result in dangerous conditions. Therefore, all children with bacterial meningitis should be followed closely not only in terms of SIADH but also DI. To our knowledge this is the first transient DI associated with E. coli-caused meningitis case reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/94. Successful treatment of late-onset infection due to resistant klebsiella pneumoniae in an extremely low birth weight infant using ciprofloxacin.

    OBJECTIVE: This paper presents a case in which an extremely low birth weight infant with multidrug-resistant klebsiella pneumoniae infection was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. STUDY DESIGN: A clinical case report of a neonate who received broad spectrum antibiotics for possible infection despite negative cultures. The infant developed sepsis and meningitis resulting from multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae, which was treated with ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. The literature for the use of ciprofloxacin in pediatric patients was reviewed. RESULTS: The infant responded to the antibiotic regimen with sterilization of blood and cerebrospinal fluid; no adverse effects were attributable to the ciprofloxacin. Although ciprofloxacin has been found to cause irreversible injury to cartilage in juvenile laboratory animals, a review of the literature found that this complication occurs rarely if at all in pediatric patients. ciprofloxacin has been found to be effective in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections in pediatric patients, including premature infants. CONCLUSION: ciprofloxacin should be considered in the treatment of neonatal infection caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. Although the published experience with this drug suggests that it is effective and that significant toxicity is not common, its use should be restricted to the treatment of serious infections for which an alternative antibiotics is not available.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/94. Mixed infection in adult bacterial meningitis.

    12 adult patients suffering from bacterial meningitis caused by mixed infection were identified at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital over a period of 13 years (1986-1998), and they accounted for 6.5% (12/184) of our culture-proven adult bacterial meningitis. The 12 cases included seven males and five females, aged 17-74 years. Six of the 12 cases had community-acquired infections and the other six had nosocomially-acquired infections. Ten of the 12 cases had associated underlying diseases, with head trauma and/or neurosurgical procedure being the most frequent. Both gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens were identified in these 12 cases with gram-negative pathogens outnumbering the gram-positive ones. The implicated pathogens, starting with the most frequent, included Enterobacter species (enterobacter cloacae, enterobacter aerogenes), Klebsiella species (klebsiella pneumoniae, klebsiella oxytoca), escherichia coli, Staphylococcus species (staphylococcus aureus, staphylococcus haemolyticus), pseudomonas aeruginosa, acinetobacter baumannii, enterococcus, serratia marcescens, citrobacter diversus, proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus viridans and neisseria meningitidis. Six of the 12 cases were found to have multi-antibiotic-resistant strains, which included E. cloacae in one, A. baumannii in one, K. pneumoniae in one and S. aureus in three. The management of these 12 cases included appropriate antibiotics and neurosurgical procedures including shunt revision. Despite the complexity of implicated pathogens and the high incidence of emergence of resistant strains, the overall mortality rate (8.3%, 1/12) was not higher than that in adult bacterial meningitis. However, complete recuperation was difficult in adult patients with mixed bacterial meningitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/94. Successful treatment by meropenem of campylobacter jejuni meningitis in a chronic alcoholic following neurosurgery.

    meningitis caused by campylobacter jejuni is rare, we describe a case following neurosurgery for intra-cranial haematoma in a chronic alcoholic patient. Conventional culture of CSF and blood was supplemented by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of campylobacter jejuni.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/94. Primary pseudomonas meningitis in an adult, splenectomized, multitransfused thalassaemia major patient.

    A 19-year-old splenectomized, multitransfused female patient with beta-thalassaemia major developed primary meningitis due to P. putida. Her blood cultures were negative. P. putida is an unusual nosocomial organism to cause primary meningitis. Infection due to this organism carries high mortality. However, owing to early diagnosis and energetic treatment this patient survived without any sequelae. A review of serious infections over the last 7 years in patients in our thalassaemia care centre revealed 11 serious infections among our splenectomized patients (n = 46) and none in the non-splenectomized group (n = 106). Surprisingly, all overwhelming infections (23.8% in the splenectomized group) were caused by Gram-negative bacilli like Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, aeromonas and Campylobacter species. As all our splenectomized patients had prior pneumococcal vaccination and oral penicillin prophylaxis, overwhelming septicaemia due to S. Pneumoniae was successfully prevented, but an increasing incidence of overwhelming sepsis due to Gram-negative bacilli, against which no vaccination or suitable prophylactic antibiotics are available, is now posing a new threat to this vulnerable group of patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/94. Kingella endocarditis and meningitis in a patient with SLE and associated antiphospholipid syndrome.

    We describe a patient with SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome who presented with severe headache and fever. Lumbar puncture analyses indicated meningitis. kingella kingae was isolated from her blood cultures. A large mobile vegetation was seen on her mitral valve. The association between SLE, Libman-Sacks endocarditis and bacterial endocarditis is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Meningitis, Bacterial'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.