Cases reported "Meningitis, Bacterial"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/40. Acinetobacter meningitis: four nosocomial cases.

    We report the clinical features and therapeutic outcomes of four patients with multiantibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter meningitis. There were three males and one female, aged from 17 to 49 years. Three of them had suffered from head injuries with skull fractures, and the other suffered from an intracerebral hemorrhage and underwent a craniotomy. All four patients acquired nosocomial Acinetobacter meningitis, and multiantibiotic resistance developed. After treatment with imipenem/cilastatin, three of the four patients survived; one died of multiorgan failure. Because the clinical manifestations of Acinetobacter meningitis are similar to those of other gram-negative bacillary meningitis, the diagnosis can only be confirmed by bacterial culture. Resistance to multiple antibiotics, including third-generation cephalosporins, is frequently seen in patients with nosocomial Acinetobacter meningitis, and imipenem/cilastatin seems to be the antibiotic of choice for this potentially fatal central nervous system infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/40. Infectious meningitis mimicking recurrent medulloblastoma on magnetic resonance imaging. Case report.

    This report and the accompanying review of the literature address the challenges, when using surveillance magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, of establishing the origin of newly detected central nervous system lesions. Routine surveillance MR imaging in a 16-year-old boy, whose medulloblastoma had been successfully treated, demonstrated asymptomatic nodular leptomeningeal enhancement of the brain and spinal cord, which was consistent with recurrent disease. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid, however, led to the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Two weeks after completion of antibiotic therapy, the original MR imaging findings were seen to have resolved. This case illustrates the importance of considering clinical and laboratory data, including results from a complete examination of the cerebrospinal fluid, when interpreting the origin of new lesions revealed by MR imaging.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/40. Clinical manifestations of bacillus cereus meningitis in newborn infants.

    bacillus cereus (B. cereus) meningitis sometimes occurs in patients with risk factors, which are associated with central nervous system (CNS) anomalies, surgical or anaesthetic access to CNS. We observed two cases of B. cereus meningitis in neonates without such risk factors. The clinical courses of both neonates were fulminant, and routine antibiotic therapy failed. Intracranial haemorrhage was evident at autopsy. According to the previous neonatal case reports and our experience, we found that six of seven neonates were premature babies admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, five died within a week of onset of the disease, and six had intracranial haemorrhage. We speculate that B. cereus meningitis may occur in neonates, even without any of the risk factors previously described in adult case reports, and that the clinical manifestations of the meningitis might be characterized by the high incidence of intracranial haemorrhage and poor mortality.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/40. adult citrobacter freundii meningitis: case report.

    Citrobacter is a distinct group of Gram-negative bacilli belonging to the enterobacteriaceae family. Central nervous system (CNS) infections due to Citrobacter are uncommon, though they occur more frequently in neonates and young children. In adults, Citrobacter meningitis is extremely unusual with only 6 cases reported in the literature before 1998. This rare CNS infection has been seen in patients with head trauma, following neurosurgical procedures, and in those who are immunocompromised. Of the patients in the 6 reported cases, only one developed multi-antibiotic resistant Citrobacter CNS infection. Adding to this small number of reported cases, we report an adult case of post-neurosurgical meningitis and subdural empyema caused by multi-antibiotic resistant citrobacter freundii and also review the literature related to this infection. Antimicrobial therapy with imipenem and third-generation cephalosporins failed to result in cerebrospinal fluid sterilization in our patient. Because of the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, multi-antibiotic resistant Citrobacter species have developed in this nosocomial CNS infection and now present a therapeutic challenge. Therefore, further clinical studies are needed to determine updated therapeutic modalities for treating this life-threatening infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/40. Toxic metronidazole-induced MRI changes.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of changes documented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head probably due to accumulation of metronidazole in a patient with liver dysfunction. CASE SUMMARY: A 34-year-old Hispanic man with cirrhosis and hepatitis c being treated with metronidazole for bacteroides fragilis meningitis and bacteremia developed ataxia, disorientation, and peripheral neuropathy. An MRI at the time meningitis was diagnosed was negative. After the patient received > 60 g of metronidazole, an MRI revealed increased signal intensity below, behind, and lateral to the fourth ventricle. Concomitant metronidazole serum concentration was toxic at 35.1 micrograms/mL. DISCUSSION: This is the second reported case of metronidazole-induced MRI changes. metronidazole is known to accumulate in patients with liver dysfunction and can cause peripheral neuropathy and central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction; these effects may take up to two years to completely resolve. CONCLUSIONS: metronidazole dosages should be reduced in patients with liver dysfunction to prevent the accumulation of metronidazole, which can lead to CNS dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/40. Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults.

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults is an extremely rare infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Here we report one adult case of this rare CNS infection and review the clinical data of another seven cases reported in the English language literature. In total, eight patients (six men and two women) aged between 19 and 63 years were studied.The causative pathogen in our patient was acinetobacter baumannii; in the other reported cases they were most likely Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Acinetobacter johnsonii, Acinetobacter junii, a genomic species 3 or 6. No underlying disease was found in seven of the eight cases and six of the eight patients acquired the infections before the age of 30 years. fever and consciousness disturbance were the most common clinical manifestations. waterhouse-friderichsen syndrome (WFS) was found in two cases. Unlike the Acinetobacter strains found in nosocomial infections, the strain of Acinetobacter meningitis in the community-acquired case did not show multiple antibiotic resistance. Most adult patients with community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis can be saved by timely therapy with appropriate antibiotics before deterioration of the systemic condition and impairment of consciousness.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/40. Multilocular hydrocephalus: ultrasound studies of origin and development.

    Multilocular hydrocephalus is a complication of neonatal hydrocephalus. Its main feature is the presence of multiple cysts inside the ventricles, which requires a specific therapeutic approach. The case of a preterm infant with intracranial hemorrhage grade II-III and central nervous system infection is reported. The cysts developed at the subependymal layer in the posterior area of the patient's thalamus. Their growth and development were charted by ultrasound imaging for several weeks. These types of cysts may grow to occupy the totality of the lateral ventricles, isolating the temporal horns. Of all the reviewed pathogenic mechanisms, we support the hypothesis of an inflammatory vasculitis at the subependymal level, with the subsequent infarct giving rise to the cysts. The osmotic pressure within the cavities, rather than intraventricular fluid, would account for the enlargement of the cysts.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/40. Pharmacokinetic model for tobramycin in acinetobacter meningitis.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of acinetobacter meningitis treated with a once-daily intravenous dose of tobramycin and to propose a pharmacokinetic model for the drug disposition. CASE SUMMARY: A 28-year-old man with chronic hydrocephalus was admitted with a diagnosis of intracranial hypertension. Acinetobacter spp. was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF); it was sensitive to tobramycin, ampicillin/sulbactam, and colistin. Based on the culture report, multiple daily-dose therapy with tobramycin was started. As the infectious symptoms remained, once-daily therapy was recommended; the optimal dose was calculated with nonlinear regression by least-squares analysis and a Bayesian method, using plasma and CSF samples. The infection was resolved, tobramycin therapy was discontinued, and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit. DISCUSSION: We use once-daily intravenous tobramycin therapy because, although the intrathecal administration of drugs is generally well tolerated, the presence of preservatives may be a source of central nervous system adverse effects. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated with plasma and CSF concentration values obtained during the first once-daily dose by using a compartment-effect model which allows fitting of simultaneous plasma and CSF concentrations. The prediction level was determined by the estimation of drug concentrations during the fourth once-daily dose. CSF concentrations of drug were enough to eradicate the clinical signs of infection. CONCLUSIONS: Therapy using once-daily intravenous administration of tobramycin may be an adequate alternative for acinetobacter infections in neurosurgical patients when an intrathecal route is initially not recommended. The development of a compartment-effect model can be useful to predict drug concentrations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/40. rickettsia typhi infection presenting as subacute meningitis.

    We report two children with rickettsia typhi infection presenting with mild central nervous system manifestations and pleocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid. Murine typhus should be included in the differential diagnosis of meningoencephalitis in children who are residents of endemic areas.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/40. Spontaneous esophageal perforation presenting as meningitis.

    This report describes a unique case of spontaneous esophageal perforation (Boerhaave's syndrome) presenting as meningitis. After a delay in diagnosis (16 days), the patient was successfully treated with debridement, primary closure, and drainage. Although rare, central nervous system infections have been reported in association with esophageal perforation caused by instrumentation, trauma, and malignancy. We report this case of spontaneous esophageal perforation giving rise to meningitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Meningitis, Bacterial'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.