Cases reported "Meningitis, Bacterial"

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1/11. pasteurella multocida meningitis and septic arthritis secondary to a cat bite.

    Animal bites are seen almost daily in the emergency department, and the majority heal without complication. pasteurella multocida is frequently the causative organism of localized wound infections and cellulitis in this patient population. P. multocida infection is usually associated with close contact with pets, such as dogs and cats, that harbor this organism as normal oral flora. meningitis and septic arthritis are very rare sequelae of P. multocida infection. This case report presents a patient with P. multocida bacteremia, meningitis, and septic arthritis developing together as a complication of a cat bite.
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2/11. Frequent association with neurosurgical conditions in adult proteus mirabilis meningitis: report of five cases.

    adult Proteus (P.) mirabilis meningitis is relatively rare and has not been examined individually in the English-language literature. During a period of 15 years (January 1986-December 2000), four adult patients with P. mirabilis meningitis and one adult patient with mixed bacterial meningitis involving P. mirabilis were identified at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung. These five patients included one man and four women, aged from 19 to 74 years (mean age=55.4). P. mirabilis infection accounted for 1.7% (4/229) of cases of our culture-proven monomicrobial adult bacterial meningitis and was involved in 7.1% (1/14) of cases of our adult mixed bacterial meningitis during this period. Underlying debilitating conditions including diabetes mellitus and neurosurgical disorders were common in these five cases. adult P. mirabilis meningitis had an acute clinical course, with fever and consciousness-disturbance occurring as most prominent clinical manifestations in all patients. Other common manifestations included hydrocephalus, seizure, septic shock and wound infection. Hematogenous spread would appear to be the most likely mechanism. Multi-antibiotic resistant strains of P. mirabilis were not found in our patients. All strains were susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins, imipenem, aztreonam and ciprofloxacin. The results of treatment for adult P. mirabilis meningitis were not satisfactory, most of the patients surviving with severe neurological deficit.
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3/11. capnocytophaga canimorsus meningitis in a newborn: an avoidable infection.

    capnocytophaga canimorsus causes dog-bite wound induced sepsis in adults, but infection may follow mucous membrane exposure. Systemic infection in children is extremely rare. A neonate with frequent exposure to a family dog and no cutaneous infection developed C. canimorsus meningitis. Suspicion of this pathogen requires laboratory consultation. Parental counseling can limit the risk of pet acquired infections.
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ranking = 0.0061143652598404
keywords = wound
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4/11. meningitis following gunshot wound of the neck.

    It is generally assumed that a missile fired from a gun is subjected to sufficient heat to render it sterilized. For this reason, retained bullets are not usually considered a source of infection. The infectious complications associated with gunshot wounds are typically attributed to perforation of a hollow viscus with leakage of gastrointestinal contents causing peritonitis or intra-abdominal abscess. There are several reports of bacterial meningitis involving the spinal cord in gunshot wounds that perforate the intestine prior to involving the thoracic or lumbar vertebral column; however, there are no published reports of cerebral meningitis resulting from a retained projectile in the spinal canal in which there was no injury to the gastrointestinal tract. This manuscript describes a woman who died as a result of unsuspected acute bacterial meningitis which developed secondary to a gunshot wound of the neck. The projectile fractured the first thoracic vertebra, lacerated the dura and contused the spinal cord at the C7-T1 junction. meningitis developed at the C7-T1 level and ascended along the cervical spinal cord to the brain. The infection caused acute neurologic deterioration and death four days following the initial injury.
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keywords = wound
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5/11. Unsuspected meningitis diagnosed by In-111 labeled leukocytes. A case report.

    Clinically unsuspected bacterial meningitis was found in a patient with fever of unknown origin. Blood and urine cultures were negative for growth. Chest radiography and abdominal CT were negative for infection. Triple-phase bone imaging was performed to rule out osteomyelitis from a gunshot wound. A left posterior iliac crest hot spot may have represented osteomyelitis, but In-111 labeled leukocyte imaging instead disclosed unsuspected meningitis. The CSF culture after the imaging was positive for enterobacter aerogenes.
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keywords = wound
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6/11. Repair of intractable cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea with mucosal flaps and recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor: technical case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Repair of a cerebrospinal fluid leak is not always easy, especially when a large fistula, with concomitant infection and injured mucosa, has developed from repeated transsphenoidal operations. We repaired such a sellar floor defect with mucosal flaps via the endonasal endoscopic approach and finally obliterated the fistula by promoting granulation-like tissue formation with recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 27-year-old woman with intractable cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea was referred to our department after repeated operations for a relapsing Rathke's cleft cyst. Endonasal endoscopic examination revealed a large bone defect on the sellar floor through which previously packed fat and fascia were exposed to the nasal cavity. INTERVENTION: Mucosal flaps were harvested endoscopically from the nasal septum and the superior and middle turbinates. These pedicled flaps were transposed to the sellar defect. The flaps survived but did not cover the whole area, resulting in gaps between the flaps through which cerebrospinal fluid still leaked. Recombinant bFGF was repeatedly applied endoscopically to the mucosal flaps. The flaps turned into granulation-like tissue, and complete mucosal covering was finally achieved. CONCLUSION: bFGF has a wide range of biological effects, including stimulation of fibroblast growth and promotion of angiogenesis. It accelerates wound healing and is used clinically to treat dermal ulcers. The method presented here to treat an intractable fistula with mucosal flap and recombinant bFGF may suggest a new clinical application of bFGF. This possibility should be examined in a large number of patients in the future.
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ranking = 0.0061143652598404
keywords = wound
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7/11. vibrio fluvialis hemorrhagic cellulitis and cerebritis.

    We describe a case of vibrio fluvialis hemorrhagic cellulitis and cerebritis following multiple fire-ant stings and wading in brackish water. A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis of this specific pathogen and concordant infection. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of this type of wound infection.
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keywords = wound infection, wound
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8/11. Ruptured cerebral artery aneurysm and bacterial meningitis in a man with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    This report describes a 38-year-old man with osteogenesis imperfecta who died of a ruptured cerebral artery aneurysm and bacterial meningitis. He had multiple long bone fractures in the past, and approximately 4 months before death, he had surgery to relieve symptoms of basilar impression. The surgery was complicated by a postoperative wound infection. For the next 4 months, he had intermittent headaches and vomiting. He was found dead in his bed at home. At autopsy, he had a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and bacterial meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood cultures had growth of staphylococcus aureus. osteogenesis imperfecta is a disorder of type I collagen. Type I collagen is present in many tissues, including blood vessels. The etiology of cerebral artery aneurysm formation is multifactorial. Some patients with cerebral artery aneurysms have been shown to have abnormalities in type III collagen. There has not been a reported relationship made between abnormalities in type I collagen and aneurysms. meningitis can also result in cerebral artery aneurysms, but they are usually due to aspergillus or mycobacterium species. The case we report is unique; cerebral artery aneurysm formation may have been due to osteogenesis imperfecta and/or bacterial meningitis.
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keywords = wound infection, wound
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9/11. wound infection with meningitis caused by salmonella typhimurium.

    We report a case of postoperative wound infection and meningitis with Salmonella typhimurium in a 66-year-old woman who had been operated on for a cerebral meningioma. The diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic implications are discussed.
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10/11. Gordona terrae central nervous system infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    The bacterial genus Gordona includes seven species of mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes which are cultured from environmental sources and rarely from clinical samples. They have been implicated in primary pulmonary diseases, nosocomial wound infections, and central nervous system infections in two immunocompromised patients. We isolated Gordona terrae from the cerebrospinal fluid sample of an immunocompetent patient with meningitis and multiple brain abscesses and detected Gordona terrae dna in the abscesses. The outcome was good at the 4-year follow-up, after prolonged treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Phenotypic identification of this isolate was confirmed by analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, which shared 100% homology with that of G. terrae reference strains. physicians and clinical microbiologists must be aware of the occurrence of Gordona species infection not only among immunocompromised patients but among all patients. Accurate identification of Gordona species may be accomplished by molecular techniques.
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keywords = wound infection, wound
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