Cases reported "Meningitis, Meningococcal"

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1/5. Thoracic myelopathy complicating acute meningococcal meningitis: MRI findings.

    spinal cord dysfunction is a rare complication of neisseria meningitidis (meningococcal) meningitis. We report a 17-year-old patient who had a 3-day history of fever, headache and vomiting, agitation, and unresponsiveness. cerebrospinal fluid showed a marked polymorphonuclear pleocytosis. latex particle agglutination was positive for meningococci. The patient was given intravenous antibiotics and intravenous dexamethasone. Over the next 4 days, he developed weakness of the lower extremities, with areflexia and extensor plantar responses. MRI revealed contiguous hyperintensities on T2-weighted images involving the thoracic spinal cord from T4 to T9 and 4 brain abscesses. Five months later, he recovered brain function, but the paraparesis remained. This case illustrates that myelopathy may complicate acute meningococcal meningitis, possibly due to a vasculitis, stroke, autoimmune myelopathy, or direct infection of the spinal cord. patients with myelopathy associated with acute meningitis should receive spinal MRI. In addition, meningitis should be considered in patients presenting with acute myelopathy.
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2/5. False-positive latex agglutination test for neisseria meningitidis groups A and Y caused by povidone-iodine antiseptic contamination of cerebrospinal fluid.

    The cerebrospinal fluid of a patient yielded a positive latex agglutination test for neisseria meningitidis groups A and Y. The latex agglutination results were not consistent with clinical and other laboratory findings. An investigation determined that the positive agglutination test was caused by contamination of the cerebrospinal fluid with povidone-iodine during the lumbar puncture.
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3/5. Rapid laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis employing coagglutination test.

    Twenty samples of CSF, 11 from proven meningitis with positive culture and nine negative controls were examined. Ten cases (91%) of meningitis, six caused by haemophilus influenzae, three by streptococcus pneumoniae and one by neisseria meningitidis have been diagnosed by the coagglutination method. Using the Phadebact CSF kit, the test was negative, in one (9%) meningitis case, which was caused by Str. pneumoniae. Subsequently all cases of meningitis were confirmed by isolation of the organisms in CSF culture. None of the nine control CSF gave a positive reaction with coagglutination test or positive culture. The coagglutination test is simple, rapid and requires no special equipment.
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4/5. Group B meningococcal meningitis in india.

    The first case of infection with Group B meningococcus in india is reported. The patient was a 4-month-old boy who presented with meningitis and died within 6 h of admission. Gram stain of CSF showed meningococci and latex particle agglutination test on CSF was strongly positive for neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. The CSF was also positive for meningococcus by polymerase chain reaction using primers NM1 and NM6, which amplify a 650 bp region of the dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) gene of N. meningitidis.
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5/5. Treatment of thromboembolic complications of fulminant meningococcal septic shock.

    A patient report of fulminant meningococcal septic shock is described. The presentation, hospital course, and reconstructive efforts are outlined, and a brief review of meningococcal infection is included. Emphasis is placed on the algorithm used to determine treatment. A 19-year-old Hispanic male presented with all the hallmarks of waterhouse-friderichsen syndrome (WFS)-sudden onset, high fever, dyspnea with intermittent cyanosis, shock, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, and the development of purpura. The pathognomonic feature of WFS-hemorrhage into the adrenal glands-if present, was not extensive, as he did not require steroid supplementation. Though cerebrospinal fluid latex agglutination was negative, his serum was positive for group C Neisseria and admission blood cultures grew neisseria meningitidis. Thromboembolic complications were systemic with the highest morbidity peripherally in the lower extremities. Care for these injuries involved every rung of the reconstructive ladder-from local wound care and skin grafts to local flaps and microvascular transplantation.
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