Cases reported "Meningitis, Pneumococcal"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/8. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea via oval window: an obscure cause of recurrent meningitis.

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak via the oval window is uncommon and can result in recurrent bacterial meningitis. Current understanding of spontaneous CSF otorrhoea is reviewed and a diagnostic algorithm is presented. A seven-year-old boy presented with bilateral congenital deafness and recurrent meningitis. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the temporal bone showed a labyrinthine deformity and communication between the internal auditory canal (IAC) and the cochlea. Subtotal petrosectomy with closure of the external acoustic meatus and eustachian tube was performed. Post-operatively, the child had no further episodes of meningitis. This rare and obscure cause of recurrent childhood meningitis requires a high index of suspicion and the use of diagnostic tools, especially HRCT.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/8. Recurrent streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis in a child with traumatic anterior cranial base defect.

    Acute bacterial meningitis is a potentially life-threatening infection of the cranial and spinal leptomeninges. Recurrent episodes of meningitis are rarely seen, but when they occur, an extensive investigation has to be made to find out responsible factors. A single episode of acute meningitis may result from bacteriemia, but when followed by recurrent meningitis in pediatric patients, other possible routes of the bacteria invasion to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) should be considered. patients with head injury have the highest risk of acquiring recurrent bacterial meningitis, followed by patients with a congenital anatomic lesion of the skull or duramater, such as meningomyelocele. The underlying cause is a transdural communication between the meningeal space and paranasal sinuses or skin. The first attack of meningitis may occur several weeks to 12 years after the head injury. In addition, recurrent bacterial meningitis may be due to disorders of the immune system, such as complement deficiency. We report a 14-year-old boy, who suffered from recurrent streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis due to a well-defined defect at the ethmoid roof after a head trauma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/8. Occult invasive pituitary adenoma predisposing to fatal bacterial meningitis.

    Pituitary adenomata are benign neoplasms which usually grow slowly and present with manifestations relating to an associated endocrinopathy or visual disturbance. Rarely these neoplasms will demonstrate a more aggressive behavior with extracranial extension and symptoms of upper airway obstruction or anosmia. Several reported cases suggest that although these neoplasms behave aggressively the overall survival and prognosis for these patients remains good. We present the clinical and postmortem findings of an occult invasive pituitary adenoma leading to the development of bacterial meningitis, coma and death. This communication stresses the necessity for the early diagnosis and treatment of the invasive adenomata to prevent the development of potentially fatal infectious sequelae.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/8. subarachnoid space: middle ear pathways and recurrent meningitis.

    Congenital bony abnormalities of the inner ear may result in a communication between the middle ear and the subarachnoid space. patients with this anomaly often present with recurrent meningitis associated with acute otitis media or with middle ear fluid. This article presents three cases of recurrent meningitis with open middle ear--subarachnoid space connections. The first two cases involve a cerebrospinal fluid leak into the middle ear via the oval window, both patients having a Mondini-type of inner ear deformity. The pathway in the third case opened into the middle ear along the horizontal portion of the facial nerve. Computed tomography (CT) scanning with metrizamide and differential density calculations helped to identify the abnormal pathway and to confirm that the leak has been closed postoperatively. Use of the CT scanner in these cases can be helpful in planning the surgical closure and in postoperative follow-up.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/8. Delayed meningitis following stapes surgery.

    Perilymphatic fistulae, developing even years after stapedectomy, open a communication between the perilymph and middle ear. These fistulae constitute a potential pathway for flora of the middle ear to invade the subarachnoid space by way of the cochlear aqueduct. Our patient developed pneumococcal meningitis 14 months after stapedectomy. The history of stapedectomy in a patient with meningitis is an indication for reexploration ion of the operative site. The appearance of fistula symptoms in patients who have had stapedectomy indicates a high risk for development of intracranial infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/8. Congenital deafness and spontaneous CSF otorrhea.

    Two patients with congenital deafness had spontaneous CSF otorrhea and recurrent bacterial meningitis. A careful workup, including tomograms, is especially important in the treatment of the closed type of CSF otorrhea. At operation of our patients, the leak was found to be at or near the oval window. The stapes was removed, and muscle was packed into the defect. The profuse flow of CSF was believed to be secondary to a wide-open cochlear aqueduct in the first case, and to an abnormal communication between the internal auditory meatus and the vestibule in the second case. These findings were the bases for the recurrent bacterial meningitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/8. cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea and recurrent meningitis.

    cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea is the result of transdural communication between the subarachnoid space and the skull base. A transdural fistula may originate from the anterior, middle, or posterior cranial compartments. All skull-base sites of leakage potentially lead to the nasal cavity. Recurrent meningitis is commonly associated with such a direct source of bacterial contamination. Organisms associated with recurrent meningitis secondary to cerebrospinal fluid leaks are commonly found in the upper respiratory tract. We report a case of recurrent meningitis in a 5-year-old girl that highlights the problem of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, and we discuss etiology, current diagnostic techniques, and surgical management.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/8. Experiences with octreotide in acromegaly.

    We report experiences in 3 patients with acromegaly while using the somatostatin analogue octreotide. In case 1, a 44 year old male developed pneumococcal meningitis 3 months after having transphenoidal surgery for a pituitary tumour. This occurred with the re-emergence of communication between the surgical tract and the C.S.F. In case 2 a 52 year old male with insulin resistant diabetes mellitus requiring 240 units/day, with greatly elevated growth hormone concentrations was able to stop insulin within 5 days of starting octreotide. In case 3, a 52 year old male with sleep apnoea syndrome, respiratory failure and resistant heart failure made a dramatic improvement which is maintained 2 years later. All cases were associated with substantial falls in growth hormone and insulin like growth factor-1 concentrations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Meningitis, Pneumococcal'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.