Cases reported "Meningitis"

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1/11. sporothrix meningitis.

    sporothrix schenckii is a fungus commonly found in soil and on plants, wood splinters, rosebush thorns, and decaying vegetation. It is also carried by some wild and domestic animals and rodents. When this organism penetrates the skin of individuals handling contaminated substances, the cutaneous manifestation may be lymphangitic or fixed. The treatment of choice for the cutaneous form of the disease (sporotrichosis) is potassium iodide. If iodides are contraindicated or not tolerated, itraconazole may be used. sporotrichosis can persist for years if unrecognized and can progress to systemic forms, including osteoarticular, pulmonary (may occur when the organism is inhaled), and meningeal involvement. Systemic forms can be life-threatening and very difficult to treat. Primary care providers must be familiar with this disorder and its presentation because it is easily mistaken for a bacterial infection and inappropriately treated.
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2/11. Eosinophilic meningitis. An unusual cause of headache.

    Human parasitic infections are uncommon outside the tropical north but common in animals throughout australia. The rat lung worm, angiostrongylus cantonensis, can invade the human brain to cause a chronic meningitis with prolonged headache. This condition can be diagnosed by finding a high eosinophil count in cerebrospinal fluid (CFS), the lumbar puncture also provides symptomatic relief. The outcome is usually benign but death has been reported.
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3/11. Group C streptococcal bacteremia: analysis of 88 cases.

    Eighty-eight cases of group C streptococcal bacteremia were reviewed retrospectively. Most patients had underlying diseases (72.7%), predominantly cardiovascular disease (20.5%) or malignancy (20.5%). The infection originated most often from the upper respiratory tract (20.5%), the gastrointestinal tract (18.2%), or the skin (17.1%). Prior exposure to animals or animal products was reported in 23.9% of cases. The most common clinical manifestations of group C streptococcal bacteremia were endocarditis (27.3%), primary bacteremia (22.7%), and meningitis (10.2%). Of streptococcal isolates, 61.4% were not speciated, 19.3% were Streptococcus equisimilis, 17.1% were Streptococcus zooepidemicus, and two (2.3%) were streptococcus equi. The isolates were sensitive to most antibiotics, and most patients were treated with beta-lactam agents. mortality was high (25.0%), especially among older patients and patients with endocarditis, meningitis, and disseminated infection. Group C streptococcal bacteremia does not differ from bloodstream infection caused by other beta-hemolytic streptococci with regard to clinical presentation, treatment, or outcome.
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keywords = animal
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4/11. pasteurella multocida meningitis in an adult: case report and review.

    pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of adult meningitis. Close animal contact prior to onset of illness is frequent and represents the usual mode of introduction of the organism. In reports of a total of 21 cases of P. multocida meningitis in adults (this case report and 20 described previously in the English-language literature), 18 researchers commented on the occurrence of animal contact: two cases (11%) involved cat bite, 13 (72%) involved animal contact without bite, and three (17%) occurred in the absence of recognized animal contact. Clinical presentation was typical of bacterial meningitides. overall mortality rate was 30%. The best predictors of poor outcome were initial hemodynamic instability and age greater than 60 years. Documented bacteremia (40% of cases) was not predictive of higher mortality. Effective therapy is based on early recognition of the possibility of P. multocida meningitis and prompt initiation of treatment with penicillin, ampicillin, or a third-generation cephalosporin.
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keywords = animal
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5/11. erythromycin failure with subsequent pasteurella multocida meningitis and septic arthritis in a cat-bite victim.

    We report the case of a 75-year-old woman who developed pasteurella multocida meningitis and septic arthritis while being treated for a cat-bite wound infection with erythromycin. review of the literature revealed that erythromycin has poor in vitro activity against this bacterium and has been associated with serious clinical failures. We recommend that erythromycin not be prescribed for empiric therapy of established animal-bite infections. Suggestions for optimal empiric therapy of animal-bite infections and the differential diagnosis of severe cat-bite-associated sepsis are discussed.
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6/11. pasteurella pneumotropica: meningitis following a dog bite.

    A 38 year old man developed meningitis following a dog bite. pasteurella pneumotropica, usually an animal pathogen, was isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient made a complete recovery after antibiotic therapy. The relevant literature is reviewed.
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7/11. pasteurella multocida meningitis in infancy. An avoidable infection.

    pasteurella multocida is a common commensal in the upper respiratory tracts of cats and dogs. Infection with P multocida in humans usually follows infected bite wounds; however, infection in humans unrelated to animal bites is rare. We describe two infants with P multocida meningitis in whom infection was probably related to nontraumatic facial licking by household pet dogs. Both patients recovered fully. Although the risk is low, parents should be informed that mucous membrane exposure to household pets may expose an infant to the risk of systemic P multocida infection.
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8/11. Infections due to group C streptococci in man.

    Although a common cause of infection in animals, group C streptococci are rarely noted to be pathogenic in man. A total of 150,000 blood cultures obtained at the Mayo Clinic from 1968 to 1977 revealed group C streptococci in only eight patients. Acute bacterial endocarditis, meningitis, pheumonia, cellulitis and bacteremia due to group C streptococci are described in a host who had undergone immunosuppression (immunosuppressed host), and the relatively few cases previously reported are reviewed. Although severe, these infections may respond favorably to penicillin therapy. endocarditis caused by group D streptococci is acute and destructive, and associated with early cardiac decompensation. The manifestations of cellulitis and pneumonia are similar to those when group A streptococci are causative organisms. meningitis due to group C streptococci is acute and severe, and responds slowly to antimicrobial therapy. Colonization also occurs.
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9/11. meningitis due to group C streptococci in an adult.

    Group C streptococci are generally considered to be a rare cause of infection in man. Infections due to these microorganisms, however, are common in several animal species. To our knowledge, the literature contains only two previous cases of meningitis in man which were due to group C streptococci. In one of these cases meningitis developed as a complication of endocarditis due to group C streptococci. Our recent clinical experience with a patient with severe acute meningitis caused by group C streptococci is reported and the pertinent literature is reviewed. The illness manifested itself as a severe form of acute meningitis, with slow but statisfactory response to therapy with penicillin.
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10/11. Serious infection caused by group C streptococci.

    Group C streptococci commonly cause infection in animals but only occasionally give rise to severe infection in man. We report here three cases of serious human infection due to this organism and discuss its pathogenicity in relation to the clinical manifestations of the disease.
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