Cases reported "Meningitis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/90. Spinal subdural hematoma: a rare complication of lumbar puncture. Case report and review of the literature.

    Spinal subdural hematoma, though rare, is an established complication of lumbar puncture. A young man with persistent back and neck pain after a traumatic lumbar puncture for the diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis is presented. A diagnosis of spinal subdural hematoma at T2 to T8 levels without significant spinal cord compression was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Symptoms resolved after one month of analgesics and muscle relaxants.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = subdural
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/90. A case of renal pseudotumor associated with chronic pachymeningitis.

    BACKGROUND: A 56-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with a left renal mass. methods/RESULTS: Radiologic studies demonstrated a solitary space-occupying lesion in the left kidney and a malignant tumor was suspected. Left radical nephrectomy was then performed. Pathological examination revealed a sclerotic fibrous lesion with a rather distinct margin and no evidence of malignancy. These pathological findings were consistent with the diagnosis of a renal pseudotumor. CONCLUSIONS: This patient had a history of chronic pachymeningitis that formed a thoracic epidural focus causing spinal cord compression and the histologic appearance of this focus was similar to the renal lesion. It was concluded that this was a rare case of a renal pseudotumor associated with multifocal fibrosclerosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0013736733893456
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/90. Intracranial transorbital injury by a wooden foreign body: re-evaluation of CT and MRI findings.

    Despite modern radiological imaging, a transorbital intracranial injury with a wooden foreign body can present a vexing diagnostic problem. The orbit forms an easy path for low-velocity foreign bodies into the intracranial space. Often the severity of the injury is masked by unobtrusive superficial wounds and lack of a primary neurological deficit. Misinterpretation of CT findings may delay adequate treatment, whereas MRI is more sensitive and specific. However, MRI T1-W can demonstrate an isointense or even hyperintense signal. Findings after the use of MRI contrast medium are presented and the diagnostic features of CT and MRI are reviewed. Two cases of such injury are presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0013736733893456
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/90. Simultaneous subdural effusion and hydrocephalus in infancy.

    hydrocephalus and subdural hematoma or effusion of infancy rarely present simultaneously, where both are active contributors to acutely increased intracranial pressure. In three cases, clinical findings characteristic of both were present. decompression of one can facilitate expansion of the other. Rapid progression of unsuspected hydrocephalus could be responsible for some of the poor results reported after treatment of subdural effusion alone. This possibility should be considered whenever progress is unsatisfactory during treatment of subdural effusion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = subdural
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/90. Monostotic fronto-orbital fibrous dysplasia with convulsion--case report.

    A 28-year-old man presented with monostotic fronto-orbital fibrous dysplasia associated with convulsions. Signs of meningeal irritation were observed. Computed tomography (CT) showed right frontal sinusitis, and destruction from the inner to outer table with expansion of the diploic space. T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed an abnormal low-intensity mass, with heterogeneous gadolinium enhancement. Although the meningitis resolved, signs of infection continued for 2 months due to sinusitis. Treatment of the right frontal sinusitis was undertaken, accompanied by open biopsy. The histological diagnosis was fibrous dysplasia. Once the infection had completely resolved, orbitofrontal reconstruction was undertaken. Cranioplasty was carried out using cranial bone cement. Three-dimensional CT was valuable to show the likely postoperative result.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0013736733893456
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/90. MR demonstration of brain abscess rupture into the subarachnoid space and its possible implication in management.

    BACKGROUND: rupture of brain abscess into the subarachnoid space as a cause of meningitis is rare. early diagnosis improves the outcome. There is no previous report of MR demonstration of rupture of brain abscess into the subarachnoid space. CASE DESCRIPTION: Two young adults with chronic suppurative otitis media presenting with signs of increased intracranial pressure and meningeal irritation underwent magnetic resonance imaging, which showed brain abscess with evidence of rupture into the subarachnoid space and meningitis. This helped in early diagnosis and aggressive management. CONCLUSION: In cases of brain abscess where meningitis is suspected clinically, documentation of rupture of the abscess into the subarachnoid space will help in avoiding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination that may be disastrous in these patients who already have increased intracranial pressure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.010989387114765
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/90. confusion as the presenting manifestation of vertebral osteomyelitis: a case report.

    A 44-year-old patient presented with increasing confusion. He was first diagnosed as having intermittent pressure hydrocephalus but a further evaluation showed CSF pleocytosis and hypoglycorrhachia. Five weeks later, his physical examination was unrevealing. Nuclear imaging techniques were conflicting, with negative gallium- and indium-labelled white blood cells scans but a Tc scan pointing towards a vertebral infection. A well-demarcated lesion in the T9 vertebral body, demonstrated by CT scan, confirmed the diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis. Although we were unable to recover the causative organism, antibiotic treatment for presumed staphylococcal osteomyelitis resulted in full recovery. This case indicates that vertebral osteomyelitis may cause significant meningeal inflammation even in the absence of epidural or subdural abscess. We recommend that in patients with meningitis without a clear etiology vertebral osteomyelitis should be considered and pursued with CT scannings of the vertebrae, a procedure that can yield positive findings even when other scanning modalities are negative.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = subdural
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/90. Granulomatous hypophysitis with meningitis and hypopituitarism.

    We report an unusual case of granulomatous hypophysitis in which visual impairment, meningitis and hypopituitarism in a 76-year-old female were associated with radiological evidence of a pituitary mass. The sellar lesion was indistinguishable from pituitary tumor on neuroimaging studies, but the recovery of visual acuity and visual field abnormalities together with the improvement of pituitary function after steroid administration indicated that the mass lesion was due to an inflammatory disease of the pituitary gland. The pituitary tissue obtained by transsphenoidal hypophysectomy revealed granulomatous inflammatory cell infiltration with epithelioid cells and scattered multinucleated giant cells. Although a causal relationship with meningitis was not ascertained, possible exposure of the CSF space to the autoimmune inflammatory process of the pituitary gland was likely in view of the positive pituitary antibody reaction and radiological evidence of suprasellar extension. This entity should be considered when evaluating patients with a pituitary mass, hypopituitarism and meningitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0013736733893456
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/90. Chronic post-traumatic erosion of the skull base.

    Delayed post-traumatic erosion of the skull base is reported in three patients who presented as adults with cerebrospinal fluid fistulae and a history of recurrent meningitis. These skull defects were associated with herniation of the subarachnoid space into the diploe of the skull base, the paranasal sinuses and the orbit. This rare complication of head injury is assumed to have occurred as the result of a dural tear at the time of trauma. Its site probably determines whether a resulting meningocele widens the intradiploic space or broaches the cranial floor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0027473467786913
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/90. Spinal subdural empyema: report of two cases.

    Spinal subdural empyema (SSE) is a rare variety of intraspinal infection. SSE should be suspected in patients presenting with fever, back pain, and signs of cord or nerve root compression. Two patients with SSE are presented. The first patient complained of fever and back pain. She had no neurological deficit but was found to have SSE. The second patient, who presented with intracerebral hemorrhage in the fifth month of pregnancy and spontaneous abortion, was found to have SSE at lumbar puncture. The clinical manifestations and management are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = subdural
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Meningitis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.