Cases reported "Meningocele"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/6. Polymicrobial meningitis revealing an anterior sacral meningocele in a 23-year-old woman.

    Polymicrobial meningitis has become increasingly rare during recent decades. Historically, it has mainly been reported as being associated with disorders of the ENT-sphere. The treatment of these infections being optimized, polymicrobial meningitis nowadays is essentially a complication of gastrointestinal or gynaecological disorders and trauma. We present a case of polymicrobial meningitis following puncture of a unrecognized pre-sacral meningocele in a patient with Currarino syndrome and review of the relevant literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/6. paraparesis after excision of intrathoracic meningoceles in a patient with neurofibromatosis.

    Intrathoracic meningocele associated with neurofibromatosis is a rarity. We treated a 16-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis, marked kyphoscoliosis, and two right-sided intrathoracic meningoceles. Because his chief complaints of cough and chest pain were thought to be caused by the meningoceles, resection of these lesions was performed prior to correction of the spinal deformity. On the day after the resection, complete paraplegia developed, followed by recovery to paraparesis. Decompressive lumbar puncture was performed, but intraspinal pressure was normal. Postoperative spinal cord damage and consequent paresis may have resulted from a loss of pressure buffering by the meningocele, which rendered the cord vulnerable to injury. The possibility of a similar unusual complication should be borne in mind when treating patients with intrathoracic meningocele associated with neurofibromatosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/6. Management of multiple spontaneous nasal meningoencephaloceles.

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Multiple spontaneous nasal meningoencephaloceles in the same patient are rare lesions. Although many skull base defects occur after prior trauma or surgery, otolaryngologists must be aware of the potential for spontaneous encephaloceles. We present our experience with this unusual condition and discuss its pathophysiology and unique management issues. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective. methods: review of medical records, radiographic images, and cerebrospinal fluid pressures. RESULTS: We identified 5 patients with multiple, simultaneous, spontaneous encephaloceles: 4 patients with 2 encephaloceles and 1 patient with 3 encephaloceles (11 in all). Locations of the 11 encephaloceles were sphenoid lateral recess (6), frontal sinus with supraorbital ethmoid extension (2), ethmoid roof (1), frontal sinus (1), and central sphenoid (1). Three patients had bilateral sphenoid lateral recess encephaloceles, accounting for all six in that location. All four patients with available radiographic studies demonstrated empty sella turcica. Surgical approaches included endoscopic transpterygoid approach to the lateral sphenoid recess (3), endoscopic approach to ethmoid and central sphenoid (3), and osteoplastic flap with frontal sinus obliteration (2). We had 100% success at latest endoscopic follow-up (mean period, 17 mo). Three patients had postoperative lumbar punctures with mean cerebrospinal fluid pressure of 28.3 cm water (range, 19-34 cm; normal range, 0-15 cm). Conclusions: Multiple spontaneous encephaloceles can be managed safely and successfully using endoscopic and extracranial approaches. A high index of suspicion for this diagnosis must be maintained, especially in patients with radiographic evidence of laterally pneumatized sphenoid sinuses or empty sella. Spontaneous encephaloceles and cerebrospinal fluid leaks represent a form of intracranial hypertension.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/6. empty sella syndrome, diagnosed as allergic rhinitis.

    Unilateral cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea as the only manifestation of the primary empty sella syndrome is a rare event. A case of a middle-aged male patient complaining for intermittent unilateral rhinorrhea, which started 5 months earlier, is reported. The persistence of this state was attributed to an allergic rhinitis. The initial work-up excluded the above diagnosis and an erroneous radiological diagnosis led to a puncture of the left maxillary sinus. A lateral X-ray of the skull and CT scan led to the diagnosis of empty sella syndrome, possibly due to an adenoma or a meningocele.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/6. Pseudomeningocele as a complication of teratoma resection and aseptic meningitis following craniofacial reconstruction: a case report.

    This is a report of two extremely unusual complications of craniofacial surgery on a single patient. A 14-year-old female underwent resection of a recurrent teratoma four times within the first 9 years of life. This left her with two large cranial cavities in the left temple and posterior to the orbit communicating with the subarachnoid space constituting a pseudomeningocele and pulsatile mass in the left temple--an unusual complication. Following resection of the pseudoepithelial cavity linings, the spaces were filled with a split temporalis muscle. Two weeks following surgery, she developed signs and symptoms of meningitis with negative cultures from the drain sites and lumbar puncture. Six days following an unsuccessful attempt to treat her with wide spectrum antibiotics, she was treated with dexamethasone. As a result, there was a dramatic disappearance of signs and symptoms in less than 36 hours; she has not experienced any recurrence since. We feel that this aseptic meningitis was the result of cerebrospinal fluid exposure to muscle--a rare, yet, previously reported complication. The details of the case history and discussion of complications and the way in which they can be avoided, are subjects of this report.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/6. Fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging for radiological assessment of neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Neurosurgical management of birth-related brachial plexus palsy involves observing the patient for a period of several months. Operative intervention is usually undertaken at 3 to 6 months of age or more in infants who have shown little or no improvement in affected muscle groups. Ancillary tests such as electromyography and nerve conduction studies are occasionally useful. No radiological study has been consistently helpful in operative planning, except for contrast computerized tomography (CT) myelography, which requires general anesthesia in infants. This is because the infant's small size exceeds the functional resolution of the imaging modalities. This report describes the use of a special sequence of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging entitled "fast spin echo" (FSE-MR). Unlike CT myelography, this technique provides high-speed noninvasive imaging that allows clinicians to evaluate preganglionic nerve root injuries without the use of general anesthesia and lumbar puncture. The utility of this technique is illustrated in three cases, two involving either infraclavicular exploration or a combination of infraclavicular and supraclavicular exposure based on FSE-MR findings. The FSE-MR imaging offers an excellent alternative to contrast CT myelography in evaluation of infants with birth-related brachial plexus injuries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Meningocele'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.