Cases reported "Meningoencephalitis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/9. A bad eye and a sore lip.

    A 48-year-old woman developed painful visual loss in the left eye, meningismus, and painful oral ulcers. magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with gadolinium demonstrated enhancement of the left optic nerve. Lumbar puncture showed a lymphocytic pleocytosis, and a biopsy specimen of one of the oral ulcerations was consistent with Behcet's disease. epidemiologic factors and diagnostic criteria for Behcet's disease are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/9. meningoencephalitis due to blastomyces dermatitidis: case report and literature review.

    infection of the central nervous system by blastomyces dermatitidis is a rare cause of meningoencephalitis. The existence of exclusive clinical infection of the meninges in the absence of pulmonary or other foci of infection has been debated. We describe a 20-year-old man presenting with meningoencephalitis caused by B dermatitidis. Blastomycotic infection was confirmed by isolation of the organism from brain tissue obtained at biopsy. magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated progressive enhancement of basal meninges with involvement of bilateral basal ganglia and thalami. Treatment with amphotericin b arrested further neurologic decline. However, clinical and radiographic follow-up suggested damage to diencephalic structures. The diagnosis of blastomycotic meningoencephalitis is difficult to establish because no sensitive serologic test exists, and attempts to isolate the organism in cerebrospinal fluid obtained by lumbar puncture generally fail. A biopsy specimen of brain tissue is frequently necessary for the diagnosis. survival is possible with timely initiation of therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/9. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease presenting meningoencephalitis. Report of a case with magnetic resonance imaging.

    A 40-year-old Japanese woman, formerly diagnosed as having Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH), developed a consciousness disturbance. There were nuchal rigidity and mild right facial weakness. Ophthalmological findings were compatible with VKH. Lumbar puncture revealed moderate pleocytosis. MRI showed multiple focal lesions. This case verifies parenchymatous involvement of CNS in VKH.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/9. Elsberg syndrome with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a history of fever, headache and disorientation. His cerebrospinal fluid revealed eosinophilia and his serum had an antibody against angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis). Then, he was diagnosed as eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by A. cantonensis. He was treated with repeated lumbar punctures and oral prednisolone. Although a symptom he had been suffering from at the time of his admission was urinary retention, this symptom disappeared as his general condition improved. Therefore his case was considered to be Elsberg syndrome with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by A. cantonensis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/9. The fifth nonlethal case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis.

    The fifth nonlethal case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis was reported. He was a 61-year-old gardener from northeast thailand who had an abrupt onset of high fever, headache and stupor. Lumbar puncture showed numerous naegleria in the cerebrospinal fluid. The combination of 0.5 mg/kg/day of intravenous amphotericin b for 14 days, oral rifampicin and oral ketoconazole for 1 month cured the patient with no recurrence after one year of follow-up. The authors emphasise the regimen of low dose amphotericin b for a prolonged period instead of a high dose over a short period.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/9. Neuroborreliosis simulating a progressive stroke.

    A 55-year-old man with an onset and course of neurological symptoms of a progressive stroke was found to have a CNS infection caused by the borrelia spirochete. Almost complete recovery was seen after intravenous infusion of bencylpenicillin. Elevated borrelia IgG antibody titers could be seen for long time after recovery. The possibility of an infection due to neuroborreliosis must be considered. If CT scan doesn't show any focal ischemic or hemorrhagic area further investigation with lumbar puncture is necessary in stroke patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/9. Sudden hemiparesis as the presenting sign in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    A previously healthy young man presented with an acute stroke syndrome and was found to have cryptococcal organisms in the CSF. Though an initial CSF examination for an infectious etiology was negative, a second lumbar puncture was performed because of hypoglycorrhachia, which established the diagnosis. An uneventful recovery followed the administration of amphotericin b and 5-flucytosine. A literature search revealed only one previously reported case of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis presenting as a stroke. The need for performing a CSF examination on young patients presenting with a cerebrovascular event, and the aggressive investigation of unexplained hypoglycorrhachia are emphasized.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/9. Late elevation of CSF proteins in three cases of mumps meningoencephalitis.

    Three children suffered from mumps meningoencephalitis and pneumonia. The clinical course was uneventful. After 2 weeks antibiotic therapy for pneumonia a repeat lumbar puncture showed a massive increase of CSF protein levels. This phenomenon was transitory. It is explained by an obstruction in CSF pathway in the course of mumps meningoencephalitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/9. Fatal meningoencephalitis caused by scedosporium inflatum (scedosporium prolificans) in a child with lymphoblastic leukemia.

    A fatal case of meningoencephalitis caused by scedosporium inflatum (scedosporium prolificans) in a 5-year-old boy with acute myeloblastic leukemia who was given intrathecal treatment is reported. itraconazole treatment was ineffective. The fungus was identified on brain sections at autopsy and was not observed in any other organ. As no other portal of entry was detected, meningoencephalitis may have originated via direct introduction of the fungus at therapeutic lumbar puncture.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Meningoencephalitis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.