Cases reported "Meningoencephalitis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/6. meningoencephalitis, myocarditis and disseminated intravascular coagulation in a patient with scrub typhus.

    A 21-year-old male soldier was admitted due to a sore throat, headache, generalized lymphadenopathy and persistent fever for 12 days. Despite empirical antibiotic treatment for four days at a clinic prior to admission, he continued to have persistent abdominal pain over his right upper quadrant region and progressive jaundice was followed by shock. After admission, he developed an episode of clonic seizures and became delirious and agitated. An electrocardiogram showed first degree atrioventricular (AV) block and non-specific ST-T wave changes. Hematological studies revealed thrombocytopenia, hypofibrinogenemia, abnormal partial thromboplastin time (PTT) and a positive test for D-dimer. The cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis with white cells of 84/mm3 with a lymphocyte predominance, protein of 97 mg/dL and glucose of 79 mg/dL. Indirect immunofluorescence assay showed a fourfold rise in antibodies to orientia tsutsugamushi in paired serum with IgM antibody titer of 1:640. The patient had a favorable response after parenteral chloramphenicol in addition to oral tetracycline. Early ricognition of scrub typhus and early prescription of anti-rickettsial agents prevent complications of central nervous system involvement and further deterioration of cardiac and hematological function.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rickettsia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/6. Japanese spotted fever involving the central nervous system: two case reports and a literature review.

    Japanese spotted fever (JSF), first reported in 1984, is a rickettsial disease caused by Rickettsia japonica. Until now, affliction of the central nervous system has been rarely reported. Here we report two cases of JSF associated with a central nervous system disorder such as meningoencephalitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rickettsia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/6. q fever meningoencephalitis associated with bilateral abducens nerve paralysis, bilateral optic neuritis and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid findings.

    q fever is an zoonosis caused by coxiella burnetti, the clinical features of which are often nonspecific and self-limited. Involvement of the central nervous system is rare and is usually seen as a complication of endocarditis caused by this rickettsial organism in the chronic disease. Specific neurological manifestations in the course of the acute illness aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, toxic confusional states, extrapyramidal signs, dementia and behavioral disturbances. We describe a patient who developed reversible bilateral abducens nerve paralysis and bilateral optic neuritis in the course of acute q fever meningoencephalitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rickettsia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/6. meningoencephalitis as a major manifestation of rocky mountain spotted fever.

    Although our two patients had very different courses, both illustrate the gravity of rickettsial meningoencephalitis. The presence of neurologic signs and symptoms is ominous and should be recognized as a possible manifestation of rocky mountain spotted fever. A high index of suspicion for RMSF needs to be maintained in patients with an acute febrile illness, especially in endemic areas, even during periods other than "tick season," and in patients without a rash.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rickettsia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/6. Correlation of the distribution of rickettsia conorii, microscopic lesions, and clinical features in South African tick bite fever.

    Three South African patients with severe rickettsia conorii infection had complicated courses of illness with 2 fatal cases and 1 with gangrene of multiple digits. Immunofluorescent organisms of R. conorii were demonstrated in vascular endothelium of brain, leptomeninges, renal glomerular arterioles and capillaries, renal arteries and veins, myocardial capillaries and arteries, pulmonary alveolar capillaries, pancreatic septa, splenic arterioles, and dermis. Rickettsiae were also observed in hepatic sinusoidal lining cells, splenic and lymph node macrophages, and the blood vessels of the partially viable zone of the amputated digits. Pathologic lesions included cerebral and cerebellar perivascular mononuclear leukocytes, mild mononuclear leptomeningitis, glomerular arteriolitis, vascular and perivascular mononuclear cell-rich inflammatory foci in the kidney, pancreas, skin, and myocardium, hepatocellular necrosis, and pulmonary edema. The sites of lesions and rickettsiae showed strong topographical correlation. Thrombi and hemorrhage occurred in a minority of the sites of vascular injury. Rickettsiae were the apparent direct cause of meningoencephalitis, peripheral gangrene, and other foci of vascular injury. Fatal R. conorii infection with disseminated organ involvement emphasizes the pathogenic potential of this disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rickettsia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/6. Murine typhus presenting as subacute meningoencephalitis.

    Murine typhus is a febrile systemic illness, presenting with headache and undulating fever. Neurological involvement is considered a rare complication. During 1994 and 1995, 34 patients admitted to our hospital were diagnosed as having murine typhus. Five of these patients presented with a syndrome of subacute "aseptic" meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Three had bilateral papilloedema and 2 had focal neurological signs. None had a rash or other systemic findings suggestive of rickettsial disease. The diagnosis was based on serum and cerebrospinal fluid serology and on prompt response to doxycycline therapy. These cases suggest that neurological involvement in murine typhus is more common than previously suspected and that murine typhus should be included in the differential diagnosis of subacute meningitis in endemic areas.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rickettsia
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Meningoencephalitis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.