Cases reported "Migraine Disorders"

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1/144. migraine with aura-like headache associated with moyamoya disease.

    A 49-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of severe headache. She had a 10-month history of migraine with aura-like headache that occurred every 7 to 10 days and was preceded by photopsia. brain CT showed cerebral infarction of the left occipital lobe. Bilateral carotid angiograms showed vascular occlusions in the supraclinoid portion of the bilateral internal carotid arteries with telangiectatic vessels acting as collateral channels to the occluded distal carotid arteries, which were consistent with the diagnosis of moyamoya disease. headache resolved gradually and has never developed again after the infarct of the left occipital lobe. Pathophysiological mechanisms of migraine-like headache were discussed. We conclude that borderline perfusion of occipital lobe cortex could be a trigger for the development of migraine with aura-like headache in susceptible patients. In the case of atypical attack of migraine detailed investigation should be done to detect underlying vascular diseases such as moyamoya disease.
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keywords = cerebral
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2/144. An adolescent with complicated migraine.

    During an evaluation for complicated migraine, a 14-year-old adolescent female was found to have a left frontoparietal cortical infarction on magnetic resonance imaging study. A transthoracic echocardiogram was normal, but a transesophageal echocardiogram, with contrast study, showed occasional right to left shunting through a patent foramen ovale. The role of cardiac anomalies in the pathogenesis of migraine-associated stroke is discussed.
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ranking = 0.090397961641065
keywords = foramen
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3/144. Migraine associated bilateral intracerebral haemorrhages.

    The authors report a case of bilateral basal ganglionic haemorrhages which occurred during an attack of classical migraine. The patient had a history of migraine associated with aura of neurological deficit for 10 years and a history of arterial hypertension for 20 years, which was treated with propranolol. Intracerebral haemorrhage during an attack of migraine is very rare and up to now the existence of true migraine-induced intracerebral haemorrhage has been controversial. Our case of bilateral occurrence of the haemorrhages supports the theory of the existence of migraine-induced damage of the wall of intraparenchymal vessels during vasoconstriction and focal ischaemia at the beginning of a migraine attack. Subsequent vessel rupture may occur during the following period of increased cerebral blood flow especially with coexisting arterial hypertension. The terminology of the syndrome of migraine associated with intracerebral haemorrhage is reviewed.
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ranking = 8
keywords = cerebral
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4/144. Ischemic stroke and migraine in childhood: coincidence or causal relation?

    Although migraine is an accepted cause of cerebral infarction in adults, this association is less well recognized in children. We present two children with migraine and cerebral infarction, which we regard as migrainous stroke, though neither patient fulfills all criteria of the International headache Society for the diagnosis of migrainous infarction. review of the literature concerning examples of migraine-associated stroke in childhood suggests that these criteria are too restrictive to comprise the majority of migrainous strokes, especially in this age group.
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ranking = 2
keywords = cerebral
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5/144. Abnormal visual evoked potentials in children with "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome due to infectious mononucleosis.

    Visual illusions characterized by distortion of form, size, reciprocal position of objects, movement, or color, labeled as "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome, were discussed in children with infectious mononucleosis, as well as in other clinical conditions, such as migraine, epilepsy, use of certain hallucinogenic drugs, etc. The purpose of our study was to investigate for the first time visual evoked potential results in children with "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome associated with infectious mononucleosis. Five children with "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome associated with infectious mononucleosis underwent visual evoked potential studies during and after their clinical symptoms. Visual evoked potential results during the disease demonstrated statistically significant high amplitudes of P100-N145 in all children compared to the control group. A few weeks later, repeated studies after the resolution of the complaints were normal. Since the same findings can be observed in patients with migraine, we postulate that a common pathophysiologic underlying abnormality, which can cause transient focal decreased cerebral perfusion, could be involved in the disease process of these two conditions.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
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6/144. The effect of intravenous verapamil on cerebral hemodynamics in a migraine patient with hemiplegia.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of intravenous verapamil in a migraine patient with hemiplegia to reverse the symptomatology and hemodynamics of the middle cerebral artery as determined by transcranial Doppler. CASE SUMMARY: A 31-year-old white woman was admitted with an acute exacerbation of migraine with hemiplegia. A transcranial Doppler showed an increased flow velocity through the middle cerebral artery consistent with a migrainous process. The patient was treated with verapamil 5 mg iv and the hemiplegia gradually resolved. A transcranial Doppler indicated that the flow velocity through the middle cerebral artery was decreased after verapamil administration, indicating reversal of the vasospasm. DISCUSSION: Transcranial Doppler has not been previously used to determine the effect of intravenous verapamil on the migrainous process. Intravenous verapamil reversed the altered hemodynamics of the middle cerebral artery as determined by transcranial Doppler. This finding correlated with the gradual resolution of hemiplegia. Whether both subjective and objective findings in this patient can be attributed to the reversal of the cerebral artery hemodynamics is not known. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous verapamil appears to reverse the vasospasm that may be associated with a migrainous process. Whether this effect is solely responsible for clinical improvement is not known. verapamil may be a consideration for the treatment of intractable migraine, especially when there is evidence of spasm of the major cerebral arteries.
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ranking = 10
keywords = cerebral
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7/144. migraine with aura and white matter abnormalities: Notch3 mutation.

    The authors report on an Italian family with eight affected members who show autosomal dominant migraine with prolonged visual, sensory, motor, and aphasic aura. These symptoms are associated with white matter abnormalities on brain MRI. All living affected members carry a Notch3 mutation (Arg153Cys) previously reported in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (cadasil). White matter abnormalities occur in a variable percentage of the general migraine population; cadasil should be suspected in migraineurs with prolonged atypical aura and white matter abnormalities.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
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8/144. Recurrent isolated ptosis in presumed ophthalmoplegic migraine of childhood.

    PURPOSE: To report a rare case of isolated, recurrent unilateral eyelid ptosis as the sole manifestation of ophthalmoplegic migraine in a healthy young girl. DESIGN: Single observational case report with review of the literature. TESTING: Serologic evaluation, electromyographic, nerve conduction and Tensilon testing, magnetic resonance and computerized tomographic imaging, and magnetic resonance angiography were performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Four-year descriptive history of recurrent eyelid ptosis. RESULTS: Between 1994 and 1998, seven discrete episodes of right upper eyelid ptosis without ophthalmoplegia or pupil abnormality occurred. On each occasion, spontaneous resolution occurred over a period of 6 to 10 weeks. Extensive clinical and laboratory evaluation, including testing for myasthenia gravis and magnetic resonance cerebral angiography, was unremarkable. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrent isolated ptosis is a rare manifestation of presumed ophthalmoplegic migraine in childhood. As far as we are aware, this has not been previously reported.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
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9/144. Hemiplegic migraine induced by exertion.

    BACKGROUND: It is known that exertion can aggravate migraine headache. However, the relationship between exertion and migraine aura is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between exertion and migraine aura. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: Tertiary care hospital. PATIENT: A 67-year-old man presented with recurrent attacks of exertion-induced hemiplegic migraine. Since the hemiparetic attacks were exertion induced, they were initially ascribed to recurrent transient ischemic attacks. However, the clinical picture, normal findings on cerebral angiography and neuroimaging (during the period of hemiparesis), lack of response to treatment with antiplatelets and anticoagulants, and successful treatment with verapamil suggested that the hemiparesis was not due to ischemia, but was indeed a migraine aura. We suggest that exertion induced the aura of hemiparesis by lowering the threshold for the development of cortical spreading depression. Even though our patient had no family history of hemiplegic migraine, a mutation in an ion channel gene (eg, the CACNA1A gene on chromosome 19) might account for his episodic attacks. CONCLUSION: Migraine aura should be included in the differential diagnosis of exertion-induced focal neurologic deficit.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
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10/144. Alternating hemiplegia of childhood: no mutations in the familial hemiplegic migraine CACNA1A gene.

    INTRODUCTION: Alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) is a rare disorder mainly characterized by attacks of hemiplegia and mental retardation. It has been often associated with migraine. The CACNA1A gene on chromosome 19 is involved in familial hemiplegic migraine and other episodic cerebral disorders, but also with progressive neuronal damage. methods: We performed mutation analysis in this gene in four AHC patients, using single strand conformation polymorphism analysis. RESULTS: We found nine polymorphisms, but no mutations in any of the 47 exons. CONCLUSIONS: Other cerebral ion channel genes remain candidate genes for AHC.
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ranking = 2
keywords = cerebral
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