Cases reported "Migraine without Aura"

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1/12. Resolution of MRI abnormalities of the oculomotor nerve in childhood ophthalmoplegic migraine.

    ophthalmoplegic migraine is an uncommon disorder, usually starting in older childhood. Its physiopathology remains obscure and diagnosis is reliant on clinical grounds and exclusion of other disorders. We report four cases of childhood ophthalmoplegic migraine, one of them starting in infancy. association with other types of migraine is common. Two of the three patients studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enhancement and enlargement of the cisternal portion of the oculomotor nerve, which spontaneously resolved after 2 and 4 years, respectively. Persistence of clinical recurrences was associated with long-lasting presence of the MRI finding, and possibly with mild sequelae. These radiological abnormalities suggest a common physiopathological mechanism with other inflammatory diseases, except for a benign evolution which, added to its specific anatomic site, seems to be the only neuroradiological marker, besides normality, in ophthalmoplegic migraine. The very long potential duration of MRI changes and the scarcity of clinical episodes make feasible its incident discovery once the migraine attack has become a remote memory.
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ranking = 1
keywords = migraine
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2/12. Migraine associated with panic attacks.

    Migraine headache and panic disorder are two conditions that have a number of underlying physiological and psychological abnormalities in common. The temporal relationship between the occurrence of migraine headache and panic attacks could be different, however. According to our observations, some migraine subjects develop panic attacks with the typical symptoms (palpitation, dyspnea, anxiety/fear, shiver, sweating, polyuria) on the "peak" of their attacks. This variant of migraine without aura was conditionally defined as "panic migraine". Here we describe two patients suffering from migraine without aura in whom migraine was associated with the typical panic attack. It is suggested that a pronounced autonomic dysregulation along with marked psychological abnormalities could be responsible for the constellation of migraine and panic symptoms during one episode. Taking into account the previously obtained results, it is concluded that compared to "pure" migraine, "migraine associated with panic attacks" is characterized by a severe course, marked autonomic and emotional disturbances during pain-free intervals, seriously impaired quality of life, and requires a specific therapeutic approach.
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ranking = 5.346697380469
keywords = headache, migraine
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3/12. Coexistence of cervicogenic headache and migraine without aura (?).

    It is well known that migraine with aura may coexist with various unilateral headaches, like cluster headache and chronic paroxysmal hemicrania. It may also coexist with cervicogenic headache. The diagnosis of migraine without aura ("common migraine") poses greater problems than the diagnosis of migraine with aura. Cervicogenic headache diagnosis also poses problems when these two headaches coexist, since they have symptoms in common. Therefore, the scientific demonstration of coexistence of migraine without aura and cervicogenic headache is bound to be a difficult task. In the present study, migraine without aura and cervicogenic headache seemed to coexist in 4 patients (3 F and 1 M, mean age 50). Attacks with migraine characteristics fulfilled the IHS and IASP migraine criteria. Out of a maximum of 13 migraine characteristics based on the IHS/IASP migraine criteria, such as unilaterality, aggravation on minor physical activity, etc., none of the patients presented less than 11, as opposed to a mean of < or = 4 of these criteria in the cervicogenic type attacks. A similar system, based on criteria such as: reduction of range of motion in the neck, mechanical precipitation of attacks, etc., was also developed for cervicogenic headache. The mean number of cervicogenic headache criteria was 4.3 (out of a total of 5) in the "cervicogenic part of the picture", as opposed to 1.5 (1.8 if laterality is considered, see text) in the "migraine part of the picture". Drug regimens and anaesthetic blocks also showed different results in the two different headaches in the same patient. All in all, this study seems to support a coexistence of the two headache types.
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ranking = 59.649591755631
keywords = cluster headache, headache, cluster, migraine
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4/12. Brainstem activation specific to migraine headache.

    Findings from functional imaging studies have shown activation of the brainstem during migraine without aura (MWOA) and activation of the hypothalamus during cluster headache. We assessed a patient with cluster headache and migraine by positron emission tomography during an active cluster headache after he had taken 1.2 glyceryl trinitate. The patient developed a typical MWOA, during which we saw activation in the dorsal rostral brainstem. There was no activation in the region of the hypothalamus. Our findings provide evidence that migraine involves the brainstem, and show several areas involved in cluster headaches. Our data show the potential for objective distinction between primary headache syndromes with functional imaging, in disorders hitherto distinguished on clinical grounds.
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ranking = 121.86869493167
keywords = cluster headache, headache, cluster, migraine
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5/12. Migraine and arterial dissection in a young woman.

    Ischemic stroke in young adults is rare (5%-10% of all ischemic strokes) and, in absence of other risk factors, may be associated with migraine. We describe the case of a 34-year-old woman, with a history of migraine without aura, who presented a sudden onset of headache with Horner's syndrome, and in whom neuroimaging showed evidence compatible with fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) and arterial dissection of the extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) and the carotid siphon. In our opinion, in young women with a long history of migraine, a careful study of the extracranial and intracranial arteries would be useful, although the cost/benefit ratio does not at present justify such a procedure. Our aim in the future is, therefore, to study a larger sample of migraine patients in order to find those patients who are most at risk of arterial dissection and who should, consequently, be carefully studied.
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ranking = 2.617793134679
keywords = headache, migraine
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6/12. Chiari-associated exertional, cough, and sneeze headache responsive to medical therapy.

    Benign exertional headache is coded as a separate entity within the International Headache Society's classification system, but the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this clinical headache subtype are unknown and possibly are similar to those generating migraine. Coexistence of migraine and benign exertional headache in the same patient is not unusual, and antimigraine pharmacologic treatments are often effective in both headache types. Regardless, optimal management mandates that the clinician exclude any intracranial or systemic disease that could mimic "primary" exertional headache. The same holds for primary headaches induced by coughing or sneezing; congenital malformations or neoplasms, particularly within the posterior fossa, are not rare in these patients. The neurologic examination may not be sufficiently sensitive to detect the offending lesion. We describe a patient with migraine without aura and exertional secondary headache due to Chiari malformation type I whose headaches responded to treatment with propranolol and indomethacin.
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ranking = 26.524628727259
keywords = headache, migraine
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7/12. Reversible, strokelike migraine attacks in patients with previous radiation therapy.

    We report 2 adults with a past history of radiation therapy to the head for malignancy (one with primary B-cell lymphoma confined to the skull and the other with multiple hemangioendotheliomas) who developed episodes consistent with migraine with and without aura. In addition to more typical migraine attacks and beginning many years after their radiation therapy, both patients have experienced infrequent, stereotyped, prolonged, reversible neurologic deficits associated with headache, occasional seizures, and striking, transient, cortical gadolinium enhancement of the posterior cerebral gyri on MRI. Interictal MRI brain scans show stable abnormalities consistent with the patients' previous radiation therapy. The neurologic deficits often progressed over a few days, sometimes lasted weeks, and completely resolved. Electroencephalograms did not show epileptiform activity. Thorough investigation showed no residual or recurrent tumor and no recognized cause for the patients' attacks. We postulate a causal relationship between the patients' remote radiation therapy and their prolonged, strokelike migraine attacks. radiation-induced vascular changes could provoke the episodes, with or without an underlying migraine diathesis. Recognition of this syndrome can help avoid invasive testing.
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ranking = 3.0622375791234
keywords = headache, migraine
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8/12. Treatment of primary headache in the emergency department.

    BACKGROUND: Each year many patients present to an emergency department for treatment of acute primary headache. We investigated the diagnosis and clinical outcome of patients treated for primary headache in the emergency department. methods: patients treated for acute primary headache in the emergency department completed a questionnaire related to their headache symptoms, response to treatment, and ability to return to normal function. These responses were compared to the treating physicians' observations of the patient's condition at the time of discharge from the emergency department. RESULTS: Based on the questionnaire, 95% of the 57 respondents met International Headache Society diagnostic criteria for migraine. Emergency department physicians, however, diagnosed only 32% of the respondents with migraine, while 59% were diagnosed as having "cephalgia" or "headache NOS" (not otherwise specified). All patients previously had taken nonprescription medication, and 49% had never taken a triptan. In the emergency department, only 7% of the patients received a drug "specific" for migraine (ie, a triptan or dihydroergotamine). Sixty-five percent of the patients were treated with a "migraine cocktail" comprised of a variable mixture of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, a dopamine antagonist, and/or an antihistamine; 24% were treated with opioids. All 57 patients reported that after discharge they had to rest or sleep and were unable to return to normal function. Sixty percent of patients still had headache 24 hours after discharge from the emergency department. CONCLUSION: The overwhelming majority of patients who present to an emergency department with acute primary headache have migraine, but the majority of patients receive a less specific diagnosis and a treatment that is correspondingly nonspecific.
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ranking = 24.462391148135
keywords = headache, migraine
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9/12. Migraine, botulinum toxin type-A, and the disappearing sebaceous cyst.

    Botulinum toxin type-A has been used with increasing frequency as a migraine prophylactic agent. A recent case of ours had an unexpected beneficial effect on a local comorbid condition.
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ranking = 0.11111111111111
keywords = migraine
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10/12. Migraine accompanied by hemifacial spasm: a case report.

    A 36-year-old woman has had repeated episodes of concurrent hemifacial spasm and migraine for 8 years. Her history is summarized and possible pathophysiologic links are discussed.
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ranking = 0.11111111111111
keywords = migraine
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