Cases reported "Mite Infestations"

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1/15. Avian mite dermatitis.

    Avian mite infestation is a rare cause of pruritic dermatoses in humans. The mites spend the majority of their life cycle on the avian host but may be transmitted to man as a result of direct contact and also through airborne spread. We describe a case of infestation with the Northern Fowl Mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) from an abandoned birds nest in the roof of a patients home. This caused a pruritic erythematous papular eruption on exposed sites that settled with topical steroids. We discuss the diagnosis and range of clinical manifestations produced by avian mites.
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2/15. Human infestation by Ophionyssus natricis snake mite.

    A family presented with a papular vesiculo-bullous eruption of the skin, found to be caused by the snake mite, Ophionyssus natricis (Cervais, 1844). A pet python was the primary host. Treatment of the animal and its environment led to clearance of the human skin lesions.
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3/15. Demodicidosis in a child with xantholeukaemia associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis.

    Although Demodex follicularum and Demodex brevis are common permanent ectoparasites of human pilosebaceous units, their incidence on children's skin is rare. We report a new case of demodicidosis in a 22-month-old girl undergoing chemotherapy for chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia associated with xanthoma and type 1 neurofibromatosis. The eruption cleared after oral and topical metronidazole therapy. Demodicidosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of facial eruption in immunosuppressed children.
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4/15. Pet hamsters as a source of rat mite dermatitis.

    Rat mite dermatitis is characterized by pruritic papules in a patient exposed to the tropical rat mite Ornithonyssus bacoti. We report a case of a woman with rat mite dermatitis who developed this eruption after exposure to her pet hamster. mites were collected from the hamster and identified as O bacoti. Reported sources of rat mites, as well as avian mites and other mites that bite humans, are reviewed.
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5/15. Demodex infestation in a child with leukaemia: treatment with ivermectin and permethrin.

    BACKGROUND: Demodex mites are almost ubiquitous on older adult skin but are infrequent in young children. In immunocompromised patients, demodicosis may be more frequent and severe, and systemic therapy may be needed to achieve clinical resolution. CASE REPORT: A six-year-old boy having maintenance chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with widespread erythema and scaling of the face. skin scrapings were negative and the eruption worsened despite the completion of chemotherapy and the use of topical corticosteroids. Pustules developed on the face and around the eyelids, associated with bilateral blepharitis and lower lid chalazia. skin biopsy then revealed heavy infestation with Demodex folliculorum. The child was treated with a combination of topical permethrin and oral ivermectin, with a total of four doses of ivermectin given over 6 weeks. The facial eruption had completely resolved 3 months after initiation of this combined treatment. comment: Demodex infestation can cause dramatic facial and eyelid inflammation in immunocompromised patients. Oral ivermectin, in combination with topical permethrin, can be a safe and effective treatment for severe demodicosis.
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6/15. Demodicidosis in a child with leukemia.

    A 2-year-old girl developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia at the age of 9 months. She was treated successfully with chemotherapy but developed a pruritic, papulopustular facial eruption that was caused by Demodex folliculorum. The eruption cleared after treatment with one overnight application of 5% permethrin cream. Demodicidosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of facial eruptions in children who undergo chemotherapy and in those with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency.
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keywords = eruption
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7/15. Refractory Demodex folliculitis in five children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    We report five children with acute lymphocytic leukemia on maintenance chemotherapy who had Demodex folliculitis. None experienced complete clearing when treated with permethrin 5% cream. Topical metronidazole helped to lessen the eruption in four, but did not provide full clearing. The one child who was treated with sodium sulfacetamide 10%, sulfur 5% formulation had resolution of the eruption. We suggest that treatment of Demodex folliculitis in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia is more difficult than is suggested in the literature. Newer sodium sulfacetamide/sulfur formulations should be considered when treating this condition, particularly in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia.
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8/15. ivermectin treatment of three cases of demodecidosis during human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Demodecidosis is an ectoparasitosis that is infrequently observed in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) infection. It has a rosacea-like presentation. We present three cases in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two of these patients had a profuse eruption, and all three cases were cured by ivermectin. The single-dose treatment could be repeated in cases of subsequent recurrence. ivermectin thus seems to be a good alternative in the treatment of demodecidosis in patients with hiv infection.
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9/15. Occupational dermatitis associated with straw itch mites (Pyemotes ventricosus).

    A 1981 outbreak of dermatitis in Austin, Tex, was traced to occupational exposure to wheat infested with the straw itch mite, Pyemotes ventricosus; the wheat was being sold for decorative purposes by an imported-goods store located on the second floor of a large, modern, shopping mall complex. In addition to an extensive varicelliform skin eruption, one employee also had chills, fever, malaise, diarrhea, and anorexia associated with her exposure to these mites. The straw itch mite has been associated with several large epidemics of dermatitis during the 19th and 20th centuries. This outbreak is the third reported in texas since 1961. physicians should consider the possibility of straw itch mite infestations of products brought into the home or places of employment when they observe patients with a varicelliform or chigger-bite-like dermatitis, which may be accompanied by constitutional symptoms.
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10/15. Eczematous dermatitis caused by Dermanyssus americanus.

    A patient is presented herein with an acute generalized eczematoid eruption. The onset occurred in late spring and was caused by the American bird mite, Dermanyssus americanus. A review of mite infestations is presented. We suggest that puzzling cutaneous eruptions be evaluated closely as being possibly caused by mites.
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