Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/11. Pulmonary varix regression after mitral valve replacement.

    Pulmonary varix is a rare finding; only 35 documented cases have been reported. The first case was described in 1843 as an icidental postmortem finding. The first clinical diagnosis was not made until 1951. In more than half of the 35 cases, the varix was present in the absence of congenital and acquired heart disease. Six patients have had concomitant mitral rheumatic heart disease. This communication describes the second patient with rheumatic mitral regurgitation in whom the pulmonary varix became radiographically invisible after prosthetic mitral valve replacement.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/11. Transoesophageal echocardiographic diagnosis of aortico-left atrial fistula in aortic valve endocarditis.

    Intra-cardiac fistulas are rarely seen and they are estimated to account for <1% of all cases of infective endocarditis. Fistulization of paravalvular abscesses has been found in 6% to 9% of cases. This is a report of an unusual communication between the abscess region in the aortic root and the left atrium. A 44-year-old patient diagnosed with infective endocarditis had continuous fevers despite antibiotic therapy. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed multiple vegetations on aortic valve, fistulization of an aortic root abscess to the left atrium and mitral regurgitation and moderate aortic regurgitation. At surgery, multiple vegetations on the aortic valve and a large abscess cavity establishing direct communication between aortic root and the left atrial cavity through a fistulous tract were discovered. This experience demonstrates the improved sensitivity and specificity of transoesophageal echocardiography in defining periannular extension of infective endocarditis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/11. Percutaneous closure of left ventricular-to-right atrial fistula after prosthetic mitral valve rereplacement using the Amplatzer duct occluder.

    A 70-year-old female with a history of rheumatic heart disease underwent rereplacement of mitral valve mechanical prosthesis in May 2003. Seven months later, she presented with progressive exertional dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and a new holosystolic/diastolic murmur. echocardiography confirmed a large shunt through a fistula in the inferior limbus of the atrial septum with left ventricular-to-right atrial communication. We report the novel use of the Amplatzer duct occluder for closure of the fistulous tract.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/11. Gd-enhanced cardiovascular MR imaging to identify left ventricular pseudoaneurysm.

    A pseudoaneurysm occurs when incomplete rupture of the heart seals within organizing thrombus, hematoma, and pericardium and maintains communication with the left ventricle. A pseudoaneurysm may cause arterial emboli and drain off a considerable portion of ventricular stroke volume. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging proves to be an adequate technique to not only identify pseudoaneurysms but also quantify function measurements of the left ventricle and allow for projections of post-surgical function. When complemented with myocardial delayed enhancement, it is the best technique for identifying the viability of myocardial tissue, an important aspect in surgical planning.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/11. Post-infarction communication between a left ventricular aneurysm and the right atrium.

    A 70-year-old patient presented with ventricular tachycardia and left ventricular failure. He was found to have a communication between a posterior left ventricular aneurysm and the right atrium. The causal myocardial infarction had been silent. This defect was satisfactorily closed at operation from which he made an uneventful recovery. This is the first report of a left ventricular-right atrial communication developing in association with ischaemic heart disease and highlights the role of transoesophageal echocardiography in the diagnosis and surgical management of such a condition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/11. Simultaneous papillary muscle avulsion and free wall rupture during acute myocardial infarction. Intra-aortic balloon pump: a bridge to survival.

    Mechanical complications of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are rare, but often fatal. Medical therapy does not provide adequate risk reduction, and surgical correction is recommended when feasible. Supplemental hemodynamic support utilizing intra-aortic counterpulsation with a balloon pump provides an improvement in morbidity and mortality when combined with a corrective surgical approach. We report a case of an elderly male with a progressive 2-week history of ischemic symptoms presenting with acute pulmonary edema, hypotension and an inferior wall ST-elevation MI. His hospital course was complicated by ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) and cardiogenic shock, which resulted in a papillary muscle rupture/avulsion from the inferolateral myocardial wall, and a communication for blood from ventricle to pericardial space. Initial management included mechanical ventilation, pharmacologic inotropic support, percutaneous revascularization of the culprit lesion and intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation. The patient underwent further successful cardiovascular surgical correction of his incompetent mitral valve, free wall rupture and other obstructive coronary arteries, leading to discharge and survival. Mechanical complications from AMI and the role of intra-aortic balloon support are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/11. Uncommon type of mitral insufficiency caused by perivalvular communication between left ventricle and left atrium.

    This case report describes a patient with an uncommon type of mitral incompetence caused by a perivalvular communication between the left ventricle (LV) and the left atrium (LA) masked by a considerable fibrotic subvalvular aortic stenosis, endocarditis and congestive heart failure (CHF). A 64 year old farmer with a history of a systolic murmur since childhood complaining of increasing fatigue and dyspnoea, temperature over 39 degrees C, and signs of CHF was admitted and transferred to a cardiological unit. Invasive examination and continuing clinical deterioration caused urgent transfer for surgery under suspicion of a decompensated hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Clinical investigation revealed a decompensated subvalvular aortic stenosis and a mild mitral insufficiency. At surgery the advanced fibrotic subvalvular stenosis was resected. After coming off bypass severe mitral insufficiency was detected by intraoperative analysis of the simultaneous intracavitary-pressure tracings. A midsystolic maximum of a high V-wave of the LA-pressure tracing was suggestive of an unusual reason of the mitral insufficiency. Reexploration indicated a perivalvular broad communication from the LA groove to the LV with an otherwise normal mitral valve. The communication was closed using buttressed mattress-sutures. This uncommon type of mitral incompetence via a perivalvular LA-LV communication was probably caused by endocarditis and an intramyocardial abscess in the LA-wall which subendocardially led to LV-LA communication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 9
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/11. Surgical correction of congenital left coronary-pulmonary artery fistula and rheumatic mitral valve disease. Case report.

    A 56-year-old woman with stenosis and incompetence of the mitral valve and clinical signs of congestive heart failure was found to have a communication between the left anterior descending coronary artery and the pulmonary trunk. A mitral valve prosthesis was inserted and the fistula was closed from within the pulmonary artery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/11. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula coexisting with rheumatic mitral disease. Simultaneous successful correction under cardiopulmonary bypass in one case. review of the literature.

    The authors report a rare case of coexistence of a pulmonary arteriovenous fistula with rheumatic mitral disease. The diagnosis was suspected clinically and with the chest X-ray, and was confirmed by the cardiac catheterization showing mitral disease and a pulmonary arteriovenous fistula with arterial desaturation (70%). Successful surgery (aneurysmal excision and closure of abnormal communication together with mitral valve repair) was undergone under cardiopulmonary bypass. In the literature, 7 cases of this association have been reported, with surgery in 4. None of the cases had a procedure similar to the above-mentioned and simultaneous surgery was not recommended. The authors show that the anatomic situation of the case reported allowed simultaneous surgery, and that cardiopulmonary bypass rendered the procedure easy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/11. Left ventricular-coronary sinus fistula following repeated mitral valve replacements.

    After mitral valve replacement, symptomatic deterioration and new murmurs characterstistic of atrioventricular valvular regurgitation are usually the result of periprosthetic leaks or prosthetic dysfunction with or without endocarditis. In the case which we are reporting, an iatrogenic fistula between the left ventricle and coronary sinus was responsible for the murmur and symptoms. This type of shunt has not been previously reported. Thorough debridement of the anulus is necessary during mitral valve replacement; additionally, previously implanted prostheses are occasionally embedded in the endocardial wall and must be excised. hematoma in the atrioventricular groove and perforations of the posterior left ventricular wall are widely recognized complications of mitral valve replacement. Similar mechanisms of injury can cause other problems such as left ventricular-right atrial communications and the unique anatomic shunt described in this report.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Mitral Valve Insufficiency'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.