Cases reported "Mongolian Spot"

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1/3. Persistent Mongolian spots in Chinese adults.

    Four Chinese females aged 21-35 years with Mongolian spots are reported. Two patients had the spots on their arms while the other two had the spots on their shoulders. The persistence of Mongolian spots in Chinese adults has not been previously reported.
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2/3. Extensive Mongolian spots: a clinical sign merits special attention.

    Although typical and limited Mongolian spots are benign skin markings at birth which fade and disappear as the child grows, extensive Mongolian spots deserve special attention as possible indications of associated inborn error of metabolism. A few cases of extensive Mongolian spots in association with inheritable storage diseases have been reported. Some hypotheses have been put forward, but further investigation is necessary to elucidate the causative factors. This report describes three infants with generalized Mongolian spots, two infants with GM1 gangliosidosis type 1, and one in association with Hurler syndrome. Findings of generalized Mongolian spots in newborns may lead to an early detection and early treatment before irreversible organ damage occurs.
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keywords = spot
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3/3. Large aberrant Mongolian spots coexisting with cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita (phacomatosis pigmentovascularis type V or phacomatosis cesiomarmorata).

    A 1-month-old boy showed cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita (CMTC) involving a block-like pattern on his left leg and thigh and on the left side of his trunk, along with bilateral greyish-blue hyperpigmentation involving the buttocks and thighs and being in part intermingled with CMTC. This association of CMTC with Mongolian spots has been reported as a distinct type of phacomatosis pigmentovascularis (PPV), namely PPV type V. More recently, the term phacomatosis cesiomarmorata (cesius = blue) has been proposed. We believe phacomatosis cesiomarmorata is another example of twin spotting or didymosis.
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