Cases reported "Mouth Breathing"

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1/11. Bilateral congenital choanal atresia and absence of respiratory distress.

    Bilateral congenital choanal atresia is considered a lethal congenital malformation in an obligatory nasal breathing neonate. Described herein are two cases of bilateral choanal atresia associated with craniofacial anomalies who did not present respiratory distress in the neonatal period. Our first patient had a complete unilateral cleft lip which facilitated oropharyngeal respiration. The second patient presented wory distress in the neonatal period by providing an oropharyngeal airway.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nasal
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2/11. Consequences of oral rehabilitation on dyskinesia in adults with Down's syndrome: a clinical report.

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate that the presence of orofacial dyskinesia is often owing to underlying facial dysmorphology in persons with Down's syndrome. A series of cases is presented where orofacial dyskinesia was successfully treated by therapy establishing occlusal stability. The diagnosis of dyskinesia owing to dysmorphology should be precluded before any link with the degree of intellectual disability or neurological deficit is presumed. A multidisciplinary approach may be necessary to diagnose and treat these patients.
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ranking = 0.42693891105841
keywords = nose
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3/11. Congenital salivary gland anlage tumor of the nasopharynx.

    OBJECTIVE: Nasal and upper respiratory tract obstruction in the neonatal period can result from a variety of conditions, and may present with variable symptoms. In the absence of dysmorphic features or other abnormalities, causes of nasal obstruction may be difficult to differentiate on initial examination. We report an unexpected and potentially life-threatening condition arising during the work-up of this common neonatal complaint. DESIGN: Case report with literature review. RESULTS: A male neonate presented with complaints of nasal obstruction and feeding difficulties. A common diagnostic approach to neonatal nasal obstruction was performed, resulting in an unexpected and potentially life-threatening, albeit curative, result. Cannulation of the nasal cavity to rule out choanal atresia resulted in a burst of bleeding from the nose and mouth. A finger sweep of the oropharynx produced a dislodged mass lesion. pathology revealed a salivary gland anlage tumor of the nasopharynx. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnosis of a nasopharyngeal mass lesion should be considered in neonates with nasal obstructive symptoms. It is wise to place an index finger in the oropharynx when passing catheters to rule out choanal atresia to feel a dislodged mass lesion before it can become an airway foreign body. Should passage of nasal catheters result in bleeding and/or respiratory distress, the possibility of a displaced mass lesion must be considered immediately to institute prompt intervention.
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ranking = 6.4269389110584
keywords = nasal, nose
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4/11. Craniofacial morphology in an unusual case with nasal aplasia studied by roentgencephalometry and three-dimensional CT scanning.

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the three-dimensional morphology of internal structures of the craniofacial region and present the orthodontic problems in an unusual case with nasal aplasia. PATIENT: The patient was an 11.5-year-old boy with aplasia of the nose and nasal cavity with extremely constricted nasopharyngeal airway. He did not have mental or somatic retardation. The patient had dacryostenosis. The morphology of the craniofacial structures was characterized by absence of septal structures, including cribriform plate, perpendicular plate of ethmoid bone, vomer, and septal cartilage; bony hypotelorism; midface hypoplasia; short and retrognathic maxilla with Class III jaw relationship; average mandibular plane angle; high arched palate; severe anterior open bite with bilateral posterior crossbites; and dental anomalies (agenesis of four maxillary permanent teeth, microdontia, taurodontism, and short roots). Thus, the patient had characteristic dentofacial phenotype, which might be caused by a combination of the primary anomaly and the functional disturbances secondary to the nasal obstruction.
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ranking = 7.4269389110584
keywords = nasal, nose
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5/11. Redirecting the growth pattern with rapid maxillary expander and chin cup treatment: changing breathing pattern from oral to nasal.

    AIM: This study was undertaken to assess the possibility of redirecting the growth pattern by using rapid maxillary expansion and a light-force chin cup for a short period of time, with limited patient cooperation, during the pre-growth and growth-spurt stages. methods: The study included a series of 60 patients, 24 males and 36 females from 7 to 14 years of age, with crossbite or midfacial deficiencies. Treatment involved wearing a chin cup 24 hours a day to force mouth closure during rapid maxillary expansion activation, which was 2 turns per day to rapidly expand the midpalatal suture and enhance nasal breathing. Lateral cephalograms and intraoral and facial photographs were taken 2 years before treatment, at the time of rapid maxillary expansion, 3 weeks following rapid maxillary expansion activation, 3 months after the cessation of rapid maxillary expansion activation, and 1 to 3 years post-rapid maxillary expansion activation. RESULTS: Despite the severity, the crossbite would always improve within 21 days following rapid maxillary expansion activation. The cephalograms and photographs demonstrated forward movement of the nasal bridge and maxilla, with backward rotation of the mandible. The bite depth remained nearly the same as pretreatment. CONCLUSION: The results suggested that 24 hours of light-force chin cup wear, while expanding the midpalatal suture, is the major factor to force mouth closure and enhance nasal breathing. As a result, there is advancement of the maxilla, avoidance of tongue encroachment upon the mandible, and deceleration of horizontal mandibular growth.
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ranking = 7
keywords = nasal
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6/11. Obligate mouth breathing during exercise. Nasal and laryngeal sarcoidosis.

    A young black man presented with simultaneous nasal and laryngeal sarcoidosis, each uncommon entities. Despite severe upper airway obstruction and emergent tracheostomy, there was an uncharacteristic rapid response to oral steroids alone. The patient's predominant initial complaint of early mouth breathing during routine army physical training demonstrates a symptom complex and an alternate mechanism of dyspnea to consider in sarcoidosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nasal
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7/11. A dental Class III malocclusion treated to a full-cusp Class II molar relationship.

    A case report of a Class III dental malocclusion superimposed on a straight skeletal pattern is presented. The patient was a 14-year-old girl with limited growth potential. This case included congenitally missing maxillary permanent lateral incisors, impacted maxillary permanent canines, and bilateral posterior open bites. The patient's soft-tissue profile was normally convex. In addition to her malocclusion, the patient had a history of difficulty breathing through the nose. The general treatment included palatal expansion, protraction headgear, and comprehensive edgewise orthodontic therapy.
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ranking = 0.42693891105841
keywords = nose
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8/11. The stability of maxillary expansion.

    The assessment and treatment by rapid maxillary expansion of 516 cases referred by medical practitioners for the treatment of poor nasal airway is reported. The technique is simple and most suitable for the correction of crossbite and Class III malocclusion and for establishing a nasal airway in habitual mouth breathers with a history of ENT problems.
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ranking = 2
keywords = nasal
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9/11. The pharyngeal effect of partial nasal obstruction.

    The case histroy and cinematoradiographic findings of a baby with partial nasal obstruction are presented. This infant's restriction to air entry at the nose led to severe airway obstruction during inspiration by a forward movement of the posterior pharyngeal wall and backward movement of the tongue and lower jaw. At the height of inspiration, there was total airway occlusion in the pharynx. These events can be explained by the pressure drop that takes place behind a restriction if air is sucked through it forcibly from an area of atmospheric pressure. Studies of postpalatal pressures in adults and infants demonstrate such a drop in pressure during nasal breathing if the nose is partly obstructed. If the adult or infant is able to respond to the diminished nasal airway by mouth breathing, there is no postpalatal pressure drop. It is suggested that partial nasal obstruction in a sleeping obligatory nasal-breathing infant could result in a sucking back of the tongue over the larynx in this "cafe coronary" type of situation. This could be the mechanism of the obstructive type of apnea recorded by Steinschneider, and of the asphyxial type of death that is suggested by autopsies on some "cot death" victims. This hypothesis is consistent with the frequency of infection of rhinitis and pharyngitis in victims of sudden infant death syndrome and with the seasonal incidence. Prevention of this obstructive type of apnea would depend on the recognition of infants showing inspiratory and expiratory changes in pharyngeal airway size as can be seen externally by the movements in the carotid triangle of the neck and confirmed by roentgenography or cinematoradiography.
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ranking = 9.8538778221168
keywords = nasal, nose
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10/11. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: Young's procedure in the management of epistaxis.

    Two cases of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia are presented. epistaxis was intractable in both patients. Young's procedure proved successful in controlling nose bleeds. One of the patients has been followed-up for 14 years. methods of treatment are discussed with a review of the literature.
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ranking = 0.42693891105841
keywords = nose
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