Cases reported "Mouth Diseases"

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1/14. Oral nodular excrescences in epidermolysis bullosa.

    Two brothers are reported with what appears to be a recessive and dystrophic type of epidermolysis bullosa. The oral lesions seen in these patients consisted of small fibrous nodules that were liberally distributed on the bound-down mucosa. These lesions have not been previously reported. One of the offspring of these patients, who was not affected by epidermolysis bullosa, was missing a large number of teeth.
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ranking = 1
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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2/14. Angina bullosa hemorrhagica: an unusual problem following periodontal therapy.

    Angina bullosa hemorrhagica (ABH) describes benign subepithelial oral blood blisters not attributable to a systemic disorder. Little is known about the pathogenesis of ABH, although most cases have been associated with mild trauma prior to appearance of the lesion. This report discusses the clinical and histopathologic features of ABH which appeared after routine scaling and root planing.
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ranking = 0.07109008629782
keywords = bullosa
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3/14. Angina bullosa haemorrhagica: presentation of eight new cases and a review of the literature.

    Angina bullosa haemorrhagica (ABH) describes the acute and sometimes painful onset of oral blood-filled vesicles and bullae not attributable to blood dyscrasia, vesiculo-bullous disorders, systemic diseases or other known causes. The haemorrhagic bullae spontaneously burst after a short time resulting in ragged, often painless, superficial erosions that heal spontaneously within 1 week without scarring. Although the pathogenesis is still unclear, ABH seems to be a multifactorial phenomenon: dental or functional trauma seems to be the major provoking factor. The lesions of ABH can be easily confused with other mucosal diseases. It is important that the presentation of this benign disorder is distinguished from other more serious disorders with similar presenting features. The aim of this paper is to report the clinical features of eight cases of ABH, in an attempt to distinguish ABH from other blistering diseases of oral mucosa and to describe their management.
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ranking = 0.07109008629782
keywords = bullosa
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4/14. Epidermolysis bullosa: oral management and case reports.

    The prominent clinical characteristic of this uncommon group of skin disorders, which are acquired or are genetically transmitted, is the development of bullae or vesicles in response to minor mechanical trauma. They can either be skin or mucosal lesions. This paper reports on three cases of epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica. The significance of oral management in treating these subjects is discussed.
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ranking = 0.22353873570492
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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5/14. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa: a case report.

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of genetically determined disorders characterized by blistering of the skin and mucosae. There are three major forms--simple, junctional and dystrophic--and each has several varieties. The present case report describes a male child with junctional EB. The aim of the report is to present the dietary situation and the dental status of the child, examples of potential dental and nutritional consequences, and the therapeutic interventions possible for children with this disease.
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ranking = 0.68088468392623
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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6/14. Oral-clinical findings and management of epidermolysis bullosa.

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a diverse group of disorders that have as a common feature blister formation with tissue occuring at variable depths in the skin and/or mucosa. This article reports two cases of EB and review oral-clinical findings of the EB types and approaches for managing the oral-clinical manifestations. While systemic treatment remains primarily palliative, it is possible to prevent destruction and subsequent loss of the dentition through appropriate interventions and dental therapy.
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ranking = 0.68088468392623
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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7/14. dental care of patients with autoimmune vesiculobullous diseases: case reports and literature review.

    Dental management of patients with autoimmune vesiculobullous disorders is complicated because of prominent involvement of oral mucosa, increased risk of oral disease, and difficulty in rendering dental care. Although these diseases are relatively uncommon, dental practitioners should be familiar with the oral sequelae of these conditions and their management. pemphigus vulgaris, cicatricial pemphigoid, and epidermolysis bullosa represent the most common autoimmune oral vesiculobullous diseases. This case-illustrated review summarizes the pathogenesis, diagnostic features, and natural history of oral vesiculobullous disorders, placing an emphasis on the treatment and prevention of associated oral disease aimed at maintaining a healthy, functional dentition.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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8/14. Angina bullosa haemorrhagica--a possible relation to steroid inhalers.

    Angina bullosa haemorrhagica (ABH) is a recently recognized condition, characterized by benign subepithelial blood-filled blisters in the mouth. The history is characteristic and distinction from other causes of oral blistering can be made by simple clinical signs or on histological grounds. This condition does not appear in standard dermatology texts, yet patients with ABH usually present to a dermatology clinic. A case with typical history is reported in an asthmatic patient who very regularly used a steroid inhaler. The possible aetiological role of such steroid-based inhalers is discussed.
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ranking = 0.07109008629782
keywords = bullosa
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9/14. Oral lesions of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    Oral lesions with histologic evidence of subepidermal bullae are described in a patient with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). Deposition of IgA, IgG, and C3 in the basement membrane zone and vasculitis with C3 deposits in vessel walls suggest the possible role of immune complexes in the pathogenesis of the disease.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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10/14. Epidermolysis bullosa. A case report.

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of rare genetic-related skin disorders. It is characterized by bullae and vesicles on the skin and mucosa, that result from friction, trauma, or heat. This article reports a case of Epidermolysis bullosa. With proper diagnosis, the dentist can treat a patient with this type of disorder without causing bullae as a result of treatment.
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ranking = 0.085308103557384
keywords = bullosa
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