Cases reported "Mouth Diseases"

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1/11. Oral leishmaniasis in a hiv-positive patient. Report of a case involving the palate.

    leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by a protozoon (Leishmania), with different clinical forms that are endemic in certain countries. The association of this disease in patients who are seropositive to human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) has recently been described. leishmaniasis can develop in any stage of hiv infection, although the clinical manifestations - and hence the diagnosis - tend to coincide with the periods of maximum immune depression. We present the case of a hiv-positive, ex-intravenous drug abuser (in stage B2 of the CDC, 1992) with concomitant hepatitis c infection who presented with palatinal pain and bleeding for the past 2 months. Exploration revealed a vegetating tumoration of the hard palate. hematoxylin-eosin and Giemsa staining of the biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of leishmaniasis. The definitive diagnosis was mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL), for a bone marrow aspirate proved negative, and no further lesions could be established. The patient was treated with meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime), followed by improvement of the lesions.
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ranking = 1
keywords = leishmaniasis
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2/11. Human dirofilariasis of the buccal mucosa: a case report.

    Human dirofilariasis is a helminthic zoonosis that is common in some parts of the world. A sporadic case of dirofilariasis affecting the buccal mucosa has been reported in a non-endemic area of southern china. Clinical findings, diagnosis, pathogenesis and management are discussed. This is the fourth case of human dirofilariasis involving the oral mucosa reported in world literature.
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ranking = 5.5993509788517E-5
keywords = world
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3/11. Intra-oral dirofilaria repens infection: report of seven cases.

    Cutaneous dirofilariasis usually affects animals such as cats and dogs which are known to be the natural host of Dirofilaria. dirofilariasis displays a worldwide distribution. Certain geographic regions account for the majority of reported cases. South-eastern united states, australia and europe have been identified as endemic regions (1, 2). However, new endemic areas are arising with increased awareness in African and Asian regions. Out of about 40 different species of Dirofilaria only a few species are commonly known to infect man, namely Dirofilaria immitus, D. tenices and D. repens. Human infection occurs when a human becomes a blood meal of an infected arthropod vector and on accidental entering of the worm. Rarely this zoonotic infection affects the oral mucosa (3). Man is the dead end of this parasite. Since the human body is an abnormal environment for the parasite, the development of the larvae is inhibited by means of retardation of sexual maturity. Lesions are presented as single non-tender subcutaneous nodules, and most patients are asymptomatic. Diagnosis is established by H&E sections prepared from excised nodules. In a majority of the cases, only a single worm either a male or a female could be identified. The worm is usually dead and degenerated with a massive inflammatory cell infiltration. Seven new cases presented as intra-oral nodules with their clinicopathological correlation are discussed.
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ranking = 2.7996754894258E-5
keywords = world
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4/11. Oral syphilis--re-emergence of an old disease with oral manifestations.

    Three representative cases of oral primary syphilis are presented. We wish to highlight the resurgence of this disease, which has occurred recently in the western world, particularly in europe and the united states of America. Since the initial presentation may be oral, it is important to include syphilis in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting to oral diagnostic clinics with atypical oral ulceration. Recent developments in the serological diagnostic tests and treatment are reviewed. early diagnosis and treatment has significant implications, not only for the patient, but also for previous and future transmission to contacts. Early syphilis is a highly infectious disease in which the lesions heal spontaneously, despite inappropriate treatment which may appear curative, and yet the patient remains infectious. It is therefore important that clinicians maintain a high clinical index of suspicion and crucial that an accurate diagnosis be made at presentation.
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ranking = 2.7996754894258E-5
keywords = world
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5/11. Oral histoplasmosis presenting as oral ulcer in a non-hiv patient.

    A 40-year-old man presented with chronic mouth ulcer for the last six months. Histopathological examination of the biopsy from the lesion confirmed a diagnosis of histoplasmosis. Although histoplasmosis commonly manifests in immunocompromized patients, like hiv, the present case was negative for hiv. histoplasmosis is endemic in certain parts of the world and it is comparatively rare in the South Asian region, particularly malaysia. Thirty-seven cases of histoplasmosis were reported from malaysia (Ng and Siar, 1996), between July 1967 and October 1997. Despite the apparent rarity of the disease, clinicians and pathologists should be aware of the possibility of histoplasmosis when cases of oral ulcer are encountered.
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ranking = 2.7996754894258E-5
keywords = world
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6/11. Oral pityriasis rubra pilaris.

    pityriasis rubra pilaris is a chronic, papulosquamous dermatosis of unknown etiology. Oral mucosal involvement of this condition is rare with only 3 previously reported cases in the English literature. A case of a 68-year-old man with pityriasis rubra pilaris with involvement of tongue and palate is presented. Clinical features, histopathologic features, and management of pityriasis rubra pilaris are discussed. We hereby present an additional case, the fourth worldwide, and review the literature.
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ranking = 2.7996754894258E-5
keywords = world
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7/11. association of oral cysticercosis and post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis.

    Oral cysticercosis affecting the tongue in association with post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis in an adult man is presented. The features that helped to distinguish oral cysticercosis from other conditions endemic in that area are briefly discussed.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = leishmaniasis
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8/11. Acquired toxoplasma lymphadenitis.

    toxoplasmosis is a common parasitic infection that is widely distributed throughout the world, including the united states. Its occurrence in the oral cavity, however, is uncommon. This report concerns a case of toxoplasmosis that manifested as an intraoral lymphadenitis in a 14-year-old white girl. The etiology, clinical, microscopic, and laboratory findings, and treatment are reviewed. The importance of recognizing lymphadenopathy as a clinical sign of this disorder is discussed.
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ranking = 2.7996754894258E-5
keywords = world
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9/11. cytomegalovirus infections of the oral cavity. A report of six cases and review of the literature.

    Cytomegalovirus is responsible for a significant percentage of asymptomatic viral infections worldwide. Although virtually any cell or organ may be infected, involvement of the oral cavity is uncommon. Only nine well-documented examples of intraoral cytomegalovirus infections were found in a review of the English-language literature. We report six additional examples, five of which possessed unique clinical and histopathologic characteristics. The light and electron-microscopic features of cytomegalovirus are discussed, as well as diagnostic adjuncts such as immunohistochemistry and deoxyribonucleic acid in situ hybridization.
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ranking = 2.7996754894258E-5
keywords = world
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10/11. Oral lesions of hiv and AIDS in asia: an overview.

    The magnitude of hiv infection in the Asian region is increasing dramatically. Oral disease represents an important health problem for hiv-infected individuals, because of its diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications. The documentation and reporting of hiv infection and AIDS in most of the Asian countries has been superficial. Though the epidemiology of hiv infection in asia has been studied by many investigators, few attempts have been made to summarise the data and assess the magnitude of the problem, the mode of transmission, the spread of infection and clinical pattern of illness. A review of the literature shows that there is hardly any published data on oral manifestations of hiv infection or AIDS from the Asian region. However, some preliminary information is available on the type of lesion presenting in patients from india and thailand. These observations suggest that oral manifestations are common in hiv-infected and AIDS patients. The pattern of occurrence of various lesions reported appears to show variation from those reports from other parts of the world, but no definitive conclusion can be drawn from these preliminary observations. Further epidemiological studies are necessary to substantiate the present understanding of the nature of oral lesions found in Asian countries.
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ranking = 2.7996754894258E-5
keywords = world
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