Cases reported "Mouth Diseases"

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1/34. Castleman's disease of the buccal mucosa: report of a case and review of the literature of head and neck cases.

    A case of Castleman's disease occurring in the buccal mucosa is described. An 84-year-old woman noticed that a mass in the left buccal mucosa that had been present for half a year. Computed tomography revealed a well-demarcated submucosal tumor, measuring 4.0 x 3.0 x 2.0 cm. The patient received no treatment at this time, and continued growth of the mass was observed. After incisional biopsy, the lesion was surgically removed. Histologically, the tumor consisted of an enlarged lymph node with conspicuous lymph follicles, in which vascular channels and deposits of eosinophilic material were noted. Laboratory examination showed an increase of serum antibody level of cytomegalovirus but of no other viruses. The patient was followed up for 1(1/2) years, with no clinical evidence of recurrence. This is the first report of Castleman's disease presenting in an oral site.
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2/34. Sublingual epidermoid cyst.

    Dermoid and epidermoid cysts are developmental pathologies that occur in the head and neck with an incidence ranging from 1.6 to 6.9%, and they represent less than 0.01% of all oral cavity cysts.Our purpose is to report a case of sublingual epidermoid cyst of the floor of the mouth. We studied and operated on an 18-year-old white male patient showing a large swelling of oral floor. His main symptoms were difficulty breathing, swallowing, and speaking. At his birth the patient's tongue was adherent to the floor of the mouth. His father had the same problem at birth. Both father and son underwent surgical separation of tongue, during the post-neonatal period.After the surgical removal of the swelling, under general anesthesia, all the patient's symptoms were missed. Histological examination of the mass confirmed the diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst. No relapse of the lesion was present in ten months of follow-up. Many theories are proposed on the etiology of the epidermoid and dermoid cyst. In this case a traumatic event can be found, such as an operation of the tongue in neonatal age. However a multifactorial origin must be assumed for justifying the fact that the patient's father did not develop a dermoid cyst although he had the same problem of an adherent tongue and was operated on.
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keywords = neck
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3/34. Primary ectopic thyroid papillary carcinoma in the floor of the mouth and tongue: a case report.

    We report a rare case of papillary carcinoma in the tongue and floor of the mouth with metastasis in cervical lymph nodes. Treatment was by total thyroidectomy with right radical lymph node dissection of the neck, followed by 60 Gy of radiotherapy and 100 mCi (131)I. Pathological examination of the thyroid gland showed no primary cancer. We review publications about ectopic thyroid and the value of antithyroglobulin immunostaining for diagnosis and treatment of the tumour.
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keywords = neck
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4/34. Disseminated septicaemic melioidosis: an unusual presentation of masticator space infection.

    melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by a saprophytic bacterium, burkholderia pseudomallei. It is endemic to Southeast asia and Northern australia. The spectrum of melioidosis in humans varies from sub-clinical to overwhelming protean manifestations resembling other acute and chronic bacterial infections. Disseminated septicaemia melioidosis presenting as a masticator space infection is reported here. This is germane to those treating diabetic patients with deep neck infections living in, or having visited, areas endemic for B. pseudomallei.
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5/34. Intraoral actinomycotic lesion: a case report.

    actinomycosis often referred to, as the chameleon of the head and neck pathology is a rare disease, uncommon in children. This article refers to a case of intraoral actinomycotic lesion of the palate in a child following a rare aetiology, the relevant literature, clinical course and its successful resolution.
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6/34. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis: current trends and the role of the head and neck surgeon.

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH)--once called histiocytosis X--is a complex reticuloendothelial disease that often involves the head and neck. We discuss the current nomenclature of this disease and review its pathologic and clinical characteristics, with particular emphasis on the role of the head and neck surgeon. LCH can be challenging to diagnose, and the otolaryngologist must be familiar with its varied presentations. Because LCH usually responds well to medical therapy and extensive resection can easily cause more morbidity than the disease itself, a minimalist approach to treatment usually provides the best outcome. We also discuss the case of a 9-month-old girl with LCH who presented with aggressive head and neck disease.
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ranking = 1.75
keywords = neck
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7/34. angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin ii receptor antagonists.

    The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) has been implicated in many cases of angioedema, but, given the potential mechanism of this complication, it was not expected to be caused by angiotensin ii receptor blockers (ARBs). However, in the past few years, scattered reports of angioedema associated with ARBs have appeared in the medical literature. We performed a retrospective chart review from January 1, 1998, through June 30, 2003, and a review of the literature. During this time, we managed head and neck angioedema induced by ACEIs (n = 27) and ARBs (n = 4) in 31 patients. All of them had significant mucosal swelling, and in some of them dyspnea and dysphagia coexisted. The most frequently involved areas were the oral tongue (13 cases), uvula and soft palate (5 cases), and larynx, mouth floor, and lips (3 cases each). angioedema may be a more common complication of ACEI and/or ARB use than originally thought. This complication may occur after long-term use of these drugs. We advise that ARBs not be prescribed to patients with a history of angioedema, particularly that due to the use of ACEIs.
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keywords = neck
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8/34. Sublingual contiguous thyroglossal and dermoid cysts in a neonate.

    Thyroglossal duct cysts and dermoid cysts are two distinct lesions which can occur in the midline of the head and neck region. Different embryologic explanations for these two lesions have traditionally been accepted. Recent evidence, however, hints at an association between them. We present here a case in which both of these cysts occurred together in an unusual anatomic location, along with a discussion of the possible relationship between these two pathologic entities.
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keywords = neck
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9/34. Heterotopic neuroglial tissue presenting as oral cavity mass with intracranial extension.

    Heterotopic neuroglial tissue is a rare congenital lesion with predilection in head and neck region. We report a case of a newborn who presented with an oral cavity mass with intracranial extension and later respiratory distress that was successfully excised via transcranial and transcervical approach.
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keywords = neck
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10/34. Treatment of vascular lesions in the head and neck using Nd:YAG laser.

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular lesions in the head and neck region, including both haemangiomas and vascular malformations, are common and many different treatment modalities have been used for their removal. In the past decade, the Nd:YAG laser has emerged as a new mode of treatment for vascular lesions, and the purpose of this paper was to determine its clinical value. patients AND methods: A prospective study was conducted in 111 patients with vascular lesions in the head and neck region. They were treated with the Nd:YAG laser by photocoagulation. Of these, 96 had small lesions, with surface diameters of less than 3 x 3cm(2), and 5 had large lesions, with surface diameters of more than 3 x 3cm(2). The patients were all followed-up carefully until complete healing was recorded, along with any complications. RESULTS: In both groups of patients, tissue sloughing occurred within 2-3 days. Healing time in small lesions was 2-3 weeks, and in large lesions 3-4 weeks. Three patients with small lesions and one patient with a large lesion experienced minor complications. CONCLUSION: The Nd:YAG laser is a safe and effective tool for treating vascular lesions.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = neck
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