Cases reported "Mouth Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

21/83. angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin ii receptor antagonists.

    The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) has been implicated in many cases of angioedema, but, given the potential mechanism of this complication, it was not expected to be caused by angiotensin ii receptor blockers (ARBs). However, in the past few years, scattered reports of angioedema associated with ARBs have appeared in the medical literature. We performed a retrospective chart review from January 1, 1998, through June 30, 2003, and a review of the literature. During this time, we managed head and neck angioedema induced by ACEIs (n = 27) and ARBs (n = 4) in 31 patients. All of them had significant mucosal swelling, and in some of them dyspnea and dysphagia coexisted. The most frequently involved areas were the oral tongue (13 cases), uvula and soft palate (5 cases), and larynx, mouth floor, and lips (3 cases each). angioedema may be a more common complication of ACEI and/or ARB use than originally thought. This complication may occur after long-term use of these drugs. We advise that ARBs not be prescribed to patients with a history of angioedema, particularly that due to the use of ACEIs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

22/83. focal epithelial hyperplasia. A rare disease in our area.

    focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign, asymptomatic disease, occurring with very low frequency within our population. It appears as papules, principally on the lower lip, although it can also be found on the retro-commissural mucosa and tongue, and less frequently on the upper lip, gingiva and palate. We present the clinical case of a 9-year-old Saharan girl with lesions that clinically and histologically corresponded to a focal epithelial hyperplasia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

23/83. Oral lichenoid eruption secondary to imatinib (Glivec).

    BACKGROUND: Oral lichenoid drug eruption (OLE) is a self-restricted inflammatory condition usually secondary to a variety of drugs and dental materials (mercury, gold), and rarely to immunomodulators and new antineoplastic agents such as imatinib mesylate (Glivec). OLE clinical features are reminiscent of lichen planus and include symmetric and asymptomatic, erythematous, reticulated and painful ulcerated plaques. Histological examination reveals perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate and the presence of eosinophils that obscures the dermal-epidermal junction, with acanthosis and mild hyperkeratosis. methods: A 62-year-old man was treated with Glivec for metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). RESULTS: The patient presented with grey-violaceous plaques on both cheek mucosal surfaces and the lateral sides of the tongue and labial mucosa, with a reticular pattern resembling oral lichen planus. These lesions appeared approximately 1 year after therapy and partially subsided in about 10 weeks, to clear after topical corticosteroids and oral omeprazole. The diagnosis of OLE induced by imatinib was confirmed by histological biopsy evaluation; immunohistochemical analysis revealed intense immunoreactivity with only cytokeratins 5/6 and 14 in the epithelium of affected mucosa. All laboratory investigations proved asiderotic anaemia but excluded infectious causes. CONCLUSION: It is believed that this patient developed imatinib-induced OLE; this relationship with therapy rather than the underlying disease rules out a paraneoplastic reaction, and negative immunofluorescence excluded autoimmune dermatosis. In addition, we propose that these lesions are correlated with abnormal expression of some cytokeratins directly caused by this drug.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

24/83. Ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning mimicking burning mouth syndrome.

    burning mouth syndrome is a condition in which the patient perceives a sensation of intraoral burning, typically of the anterior tongue. This article presents a case report of a patient presenting for orofacial pain evaluation in whom ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning is diagnosed. The clinician should be aware of neurotoxin poisoning as a possible cause of symptoms of burning mouth, especially among patients who have recently traveled to a tropical area. Recognition of this condition in this case highlights the need for a detailed and accurate patient history.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

25/83. Ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumor of the hard palate--a case report.

    Ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumor (ECMT) is a rare tumor. Only 26 cases of ECMT have been reported, all occurred in the anterior tongue. We present a case of a 30-year-old male with a nodule in the hard palate, which was reported as ECMT on histopathology. The differential diagnosis considered included are extraskeletal myxoid chondroma, ECMT, pleomorphic adenoma, oral focal mucinosis, chondroid choristoma, and ossifying fibromyxoid tumor. After serial sections no other component was observed and a diagnosis of ECMT was made by exclusion. The patient is asymptomatic on follow up. A review of existing literature is also presented here.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

26/83. Oral pityriasis rubra pilaris.

    pityriasis rubra pilaris is a chronic, papulosquamous dermatosis of unknown etiology. Oral mucosal involvement of this condition is rare with only 3 previously reported cases in the English literature. A case of a 68-year-old man with pityriasis rubra pilaris with involvement of tongue and palate is presented. Clinical features, histopathologic features, and management of pityriasis rubra pilaris are discussed. We hereby present an additional case, the fourth worldwide, and review the literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

27/83. It's on the tip of my tongue.

    A 48-year-old white woman was admitted to the hospital with low-grade fever, night sweats, fatigue, nonproductive cough with dyspnea, bilateral knee pain, and swelling that progressed slowly over 6 weeks. She was a 30-pack-year smoker, and had received outpatient antibiotic therapy with clarithromycin and then cephalexin without improvement. The admission chest radiograph showed bilateral interstitial infiltrates, and an effusion was seen on knee radiographs. She was treated with levofloxacin, cefepime, and methylprednisolone with some improvement, but fevers persisted up to 104 degrees F/40 degrees C. She also developed multiple painful skin nodules (Figure 1) and an enlarging painful tongue ulcer (Figure 2). Her bilateral knee swelling and pain also worsened, and a bone scan showed increased activity. skin biopsy showed acute and chronic inflammation with an abscess that contained "yeast" (Figure 3). Fungal culture from the skin lesion and joint fluid aspirate grew blastomyces dermatitidis. urine antigen and blood antigen enzyme-linked immunoassays for B. dermatitidis were positive. The patient was started on a 6-month course of itraconazole oral solution with slow resolution of her joint inflammation and skin lesions over the next several weeks.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

28/83. Graft-versus-host disease, an eight case report and literature review.

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a common complication in bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients. It is characterized by systemic and oral cavity alterations. Depending on the timing of lesions, GVHD is classified as acute or chronic. Alterations in the oral cavity are lichenoid reticular lesions, erythema, ulcerations, and xerostomia. Sporadically, mucocele and pyogenic granulomas can be present. Aim: To describe GVHD oral manifestations in eight allogenic BMT patients, and discuss GVHD and drug-immunosuppresion associated lesions diagnosis and treatment. Study design: For a year, we examined the oral mucosa of eight consecutive allogenic BMT patients attending the dermatology out-patient clinic at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (National Institute of Oncology) in mexico City, looking for oral mucosa lesions. Results: patients were five men and three women, ages 24.8 -/ 9.7 years. Four had a BMT because of chronic granulocytic, two for acute myeloblastic, one for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and one for aplastic anemia. Three patients developed acute GVHD, with reticular oral mucosa lesions, erythema and mucositis; and all eight developed chronic GVHD, with reticular oral lesions, erythema, and ulcerations. A Patient had tongue and cheek pyogenic granulomas. Six reported xerostomia. Other oral lesions, associated to drug-immunosuppression, were candidiasis and herpes simplex. Conclusions: patients with GVHD frequently develop oral lesions, some of which interfere with normal feeding; timely diagnosis and treatment are therefore essential to improve the quality of life of affected patients. We propose an alternative treatment for pyogenic granulomas.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

29/83. Ramsay-Hunt syndrome with vesicular stomatitis in a 4-year-old infant.

    Ramsay-Hunt syndrome (RHS) usually affects adults, but rare cases of preschool children with RHS have been reported. We report a case of RHS in a healthy 4-year-old girl. At the age of 4 years and 5 months, she complained of pain in her mouth and herpes zoster vesicles were noted on the left soft palate and tongue without left pinna, and complete left facial paralysis subsequently developed. She was treated with acyclovir and steroids. Six months later, her facial paralysis had almost fully resolved.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

30/83. Oral lichen planus and squamous carcinoma: case report and update of the literature.

    A case of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue arising in the plaque form of oral lichen planus is presented. The literature on lichen planus is reviewed with emphasis upon the malignant transformation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Mouth Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.