Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/8. Kawasaki disease.

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis affecting medium and small sized arteries. The diagnosis is based entirely on recognition of a typical sequence of clinical features. Detection of any one clinical feature does not have any diagnostic significance. We report an uncommon case of Kawasaki disease in 10 months old male child with the analysis of its natural history, etiopathology, treatment and prognosis of the disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = prognosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/8. Kawasaki disease in the adult: a case report and review of the literature.

    Kawasaki disease, predominantly a disease of childhood, includes such symptoms as acute vasculitis, mucosal inflammation, rash, cervical adenopathy, and edema. Its most severe forms are associated with coronary artery aneurysms. We report a rare case of this disease in an asymptomatic adult and review its epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = prognosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/8. Long-term follow-up of a patient with Kawasaki disease and coronary aneurysm associated with asymptomatic thrombosis: a case report.

    A 20-year-old male was first diagnosed with Kawasaki disease at age 2 years 9 months. coronary angiography in the acute phase revealed coronary aneurysms, so chronic antiplatelet therapy was initiated with aspirin and ticlopidine. The patient was asymptomatic and was followed up. Stress myocardial imaging showed asymptomatic myocardial ischemia at age 20 years. coronary angiography was performed, and revealed 99% occlusion of the right coronary artery and collateral circulation from the left coronary artery. Occlusion was attributed to coronary aneurysm thrombosis. Much remains unknown about the long-term prognosis in patients with coronary aneurysm associated with Kawasaki disease. Asymptomatic children who are followed up sometimes develop ischemic heart disease as young adults. This case highlights the need for long-term follow-up in patients with Kawasaki disease and coronary aneurysms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = prognosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/8. Asymptomatic myocardial infarction in Kawasaki disease: long-term prognosis.

    Eight patients with Kawasaki disease who had sustained asymptomatic myocardial infarction 8-15 years ago (mean, 13.1 years) were reexamined by various noninvasive cardiac function tests to assess long-term prognosis. At present, electrocardiograms (ECGs) are normal in six patients. However, all eight patients had a prolonged preejection period (PEP) to left ventricular ejection time (LVET) ratio 30 s after amylnitrate (AN) inhalation. Six patients had perfusion defects by exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy, and two patients developed ST segment depression in treadmill exercise testing. These patients are symptom-free even though their physical activity has not been restricted. Yet they proved to have serious abnormalities suggesting sequelae of myocardial infarction or existing myocardial ischemia. Judging from the results of noninvasive cardiac function tests and recently performed coronary angiography, five of the eight patients require coronary bypass surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = prognosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/8. Long-term prognosis of Kawasaki disease patients with coronary artery obstruction.

    The prognosis of coronary artery obstruction was studied in patients with Kawasaki disease. Between May 1973 and December 1987, coronary artery obstruction was diagnosed by coronary angiography in 30 patients (21 males, 9 females), of whom, only 8 (26.7%) had clinical symptoms. One patient died after 9 years of illness. Two complained of frequent chest pain, which disappeared after bypass surgery in one case and spontaneously in the other. Five had symptomatic myocardial infarction. myocardial ischemia was diagnosed in 31.8% by treadmill stress testing, but was well demonstrated in 85.7% by thallium-201 myocardial tomography. Frequent ventricular premature beats, Wenckebach-type atrioventricular block, and ST-segment depression accompanied by chest pain were recognized by 24-h Holter monitoring. In the past, the methods used to determine the prognosis of Kawasaki disease patients with coronary artery obstruction were not adequate. However, the examinations used in this study revealed an improved ability to determine the prognosis in this disease. Myocardial tomography, in particular, provided a more accurate evaluation of myocardial damage. Ventricular arrhythmias seem to be a serious problem in these patients. Therefore, careful observation using these tests, especially myocardial tomography and Holter monitoring, should be done even if the patients are free of symptoms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = prognosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/8. Long-term prognosis of giant coronary aneurysm in Kawasaki disease: an angiographic study.

    The incidence of coronary obstruction subsequent to giant coronary aneurysm in Kawasaki disease was studied. In 20 cases, aneurysms with a maximal diameter greater than 8 mm were identified by coronary angiography 2 to 120 months (mean 16.9 months) after onset. There were 25 giant aneurysms among these 20 patients, all of whom underwent coronary angiography between 12 and 134 months (mean 31.7 months) after initial examination. Coronary obstruction occurred in six cases (30.0%), all within 4 years of onset of disease. There were five obstructive aneurysms in the right coronary artery (5/12; 41.7%) and two in the left coronary artery (2/13; 15.4%). One of these patients developed symptomatic myocardial infarction. Two had abnormal electrocardiographic findings suggesting myocardial infarction. In five cases, persistent perfusion defects were found by myocardial imaging. On the other hand, in two patients giant aneurysms persisted without obstructive changes for greater than 10 years. In both cases the aneurysm was in the left coronary artery and obstruction of the right coronary artery was found at initial angiography. These results seem to indicate the limited efficacy of antiplatelet therapy for giant coronary aneurysms in Kawasaki disease and that giant aneurysms are likely to progress to become obstructive within a few years even if antiplatelet therapy is given. Other forms of treatment, including surgery, should therefore be considered in such patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = prognosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/8. Kawasaki disease.

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, multisystem illness that predominantly affects young children and has been described throughout the world. The triphasic course includes an initial phase of acute illness marked by high fever, conjunctival injection, oral changes, and erythematous rash. The second, subacute, phase begins with a decline of the acute findings and proceeds with desquamation of rash, joint manifestations, thrombocytosis, and cardiac disease. Most deaths (1 to 2 percent of cases) occur in this phase, usually resulting from myocardial infarction. During the third phase all signs of clinical illness subside. The prognosis is related to the degree of cardiac involvement, and 14 to 20 percent of patients develop coronary artery aneurysms. Inhibition of platelet aggregation, combined with symptomatic relief and supportive measures, forms the cornerstone of therapy. family physicians need to be aware of this illness, particularly since it can no longer be considered rare.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = prognosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/8. Ventricular arrhythmia and possible myocardial ischemia in late stage Kawasaki disease: patient with a normal coronary arteriogram.

    Recent research reveals that some patients with a normal coronary arteriogram present with myocardial ischemia in the late stages of Kawasaki disease (KD). The present paper reports a patient who developed ventricular arrhythmia and possible myocardial ischemia in the late stages of KD but whose coronary arteriogram was normal. The onset of KD was at 2 years of age but cardiac involvement including coronary arterial lesion was not detected during the acute stage. At 11 years of age, the Holter electrocardiogram showed both frequent ventricular premature contractions and ventricular tachycardia. The single photon emission computed tomogram demonstrated possible myocardial ischemia. Possible myocardial ischemia was considered to be one of the causes of the ventricular arrhythmia. Although the prognosis for the majority of patients without apparent coronary arterial lesion is excellent, regular follow up must be performed on patients with a history of KD.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = prognosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.