Cases reported "Mucormycosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/135. Primary subcutaneous mucormycosis (zygomycosis): a case report.

    A case of mycormycosis presenting primarily as a subcutaneous mass of the left leg in an immunocompetent individual is described. The mass that was diagnosed initially as a non-specific foreign body granulomatous process recurred a year later. Histopathological examination of the primary and recurrent lesions revealed partly degenerated hyphae associated with acute necrotizing and chronic granulomatous inflammation. Histomorphological features of primary subcutaneous mucormycosis without predisposing factors have not been previously reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/135. Combined anti-fungal therapy and surgical resection as treatment of pulmonary zygomycosis in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Opportunistic fungal infection is a rare but severe complication in allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients. We report a 49-year-old patient who developed pneumonitis after BMT, due to a mucorales fungus (class Zygomycetes), absidia corymbifera. Infections due to mucormycosis are likely to become increasingly recognized even though the occurrence after BMT has only been described sporadically. We postulate that the patient was contaminated before BMT despite no intensive drug treatment or other iatrogenic features, related to his poor living conditions and developed the infection during aplasia. He immediately received i.v. liposomal amphotericin b (AmBisome) and GM-CSF. Because there was no response, the infected area and necrotic tissue were resected. Despite initial clinical and biological improvement and the absence of Mucor on mycological examination post-surgery, the patient died 3 weeks later from bilateral pulmonary infection and multiorgan failure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/135. Pulmonary rhizopus infection in a diabetic renal transplant recipient.

    Infectious complications after renal transplantation remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. mucormycosis is a rare infection in renal transplant recipients; however, mortality is exceedingly high. risk factors predisposing to this disease include prolonged neutropenia, diabetes, and patients who are immunosuppressed (Singh N, Gayowski T, Singh J, Yu LV. Invasive gastrointestinal zygomycosis in a liver transplant recipient: case report and review of zygomycosis in solid-organ transplant recipients, Clin Infect Dis 1995: 20: 617). life-threatening infections can occur, as this fungus has the propensity to invade blood vessel endothelium, resulting in hematological dissemination. We report a case of cavitary rhizopus lung infection, 2 months after renal transplantation, where the patient was treated successfully with amphotericin b and surgical resection of the lesions with preservation of his allograft function. In this era of intensified immunosuppression, we may see an increased incidence of mucormycosis in transplant population. Invasive diagnostic work-up is mandatory in case of suspicion; amphotericin b and, in selected cases, surgical resection are the mainstays of therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/135. Successful treatment of rhino-orbital mucormycosis without exenteration: the use of multiple treatment modalities.

    PURPOSE: To describe the successful management of rhino-orbital mucormycosis without the use of orbital exenteration. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: The patient had successful eradication of the fungal infection with retention of normal vision and ocular function. CONCLUSIONS: The use of multiple treatment modalities including aggressive surgical debridement guided by intraoperative frozen section monitoring, intravenous liposomal amphotericin b, intraorbital regular amphotericin b and hyperbaric oxygen may allow complete resolution of orbital phycomycosis and spare the patient from the blindness and disfigurement associated with exenteration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.27201672075716
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/135. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    The hazards associated with invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis in oncology patients are well recognised. These conditions typically present late in treatment, often after prolonged or recurrent episodes of neutropenia. We report the occurrence of absidia corymbifera infection causing rhinocerebral zygomycosis in two children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, early in the induction phase of treatment and within a 3-month interval, in the same oncology unit. The initial presentation of facial pain was rapidly followed by the development of cranial nerve palsies, cavernous sinus thrombosis, diabetes insipidus, seizures and death within 9 days of symptom onset, despite aggressive management with high-dose liposomal amphotericin (Ambisome), surgical debridement and local instillation of amphotericin solution. These cases highlight the need for awareness of zygomycosis as a potentially lethal fungal infection that can present even with short duration exposure to the usual risk factors. Their occurrence within a limited time period raises questions as to the relative importance of environmental exposure. The failure of medical and surgical intervention to impact on the course illustrates the need to develop appropriate preventative strategies which may have to incorporate measures to reduce the environmental exposure of susceptible patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/135. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    We report a case of a 28-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed rhinocerebral zygomycosis during induction chemotherapy. This life-threatening fungal infection is an infrequent cause of neutropenic fever, and is occasionally found in patients with leukemia and lymphoma, or patients with severely compromised defence mechanisms due to other diseases. It is caused by moulds belonging to the Mucoraceae family, and is characterized by local destruction of the affected organ. In our patient, the infection spread from the paranasal sinuses to the right orbit, destroyed intraorbital structures and resulted in blindness within days. biopsy from the right maxillary sinus was performed and mucormycosis was suspected through microscopic examination. culture of the resected specimen identified rhizopus arrhizus as the causing agent. Treatment of zygomycosis should consist of radical surgical debridement of the infected tissue, together with intensive broad-spectrum antimycotic therapy with amphotericin b. What could be learned from this case is, that aggressive approaches to identify the cause of infection is necessary, and that aggressive treatment strategies are inevitable to overcome the infection. Furthermore, treatment of the underlying disease should be continued as soon as possible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/135. Resolution of rhinocerebral zygomycosis associated with adjuvant administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    We successfully treated 3 consecutive patients who had nonneutropenic rhinocerebral zygomycosis, by use of subcutaneous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy combined with traditional surgical and medical treatment. All patients are currently free of disease. granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor should be considered as adjuvant therapy for rhinocerebral zygomycosis; however, optimum dose and length of therapy are unknown.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/135. Case report. Successful outcome of invasive nasal sinus zygomycosis in a child with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia due to liposomal amphotericin b.

    We report a case of life-threatening nasal sinus zygomycosis that developed during remission induction therapy for a relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The patient was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin b and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor followed by surgical reconstruction of the resultant cutaneous defect.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.25
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/135. Lethal rhinocerebral phycomycosis in a healthy adult: a case report and review of the literature.

    A lethal case of rhino-orbital-cerebral phycomycosis (mucormycosis) in an otherwise healthy man is presented. The clinical, radiologic, and ante mortem surgical pathology associated with microbiologic examinations failed to yield the diagnosis of fungal infection as the cause of a clinical presentation of acute sphenoid sinusitis with a fulminant cavernous sinus thrombosis. No similar case report was found in review of the literature. There is a need for a high degree of suspicion in this condition to improve the uniformly poor prognosis in this devastating infectious disease. Emphasis is placed on the necessity for early tissue or microbiologic diagnosis with appropriate histologic stains and fungal cultures. Treatment consists of extensive surgical excision of all necrotic or questionably viable tissue in conjunction with alternate-day amphotericin b therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3600836037858
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/135. Invasive mucormycosis in benign gastric ulcer.

    Fungal elements are frequently noted overlying the base of chronic peptic ulcers of the stomach and it has been suggested that the fungi enhance the degree of necrosis and that these cases have protracted disease and deeper ulcers with more perforations. It has also been postulated that the number of fungal elements might be increased in the stomach of patients who are receiving potent medications such as H2-receptor antagonists to reduce gastric acidity, but there have not been adequate control studies, and the deleterious effects from the presence of the fungi in these cases have not been substantiated. We present a very rare case of invasive mucormycosis (phycomycosis) occurring in the base of a chronic gastric ulcer in a 55 years old diabetic male. This case was clinically and radiologically been mistaken for a gastric carcinoma. In addition, the ulcer was complicated by perforation and fungal septicemia with subsequent fatal outcome. The clinical, radiological and histopathological features are described together with a literature review of other reported fungal gastric ulcers.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.27201672075716
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Mucormycosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.