Cases reported "Mucormycosis"

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11/135. Bilateral rhinocerebral phycomycosis.

    A 51-year-old diabetic woman developed bilateral rhinoorbitocerebral phycomycosis. Successful treatment was accomplished by correction of the ketoacidosis, surgical debridement, and amphotericin b therapy. Rhinoorbitocerebral phycomycosis is a fulminant and frequently fatal disease most often seen in debilitated hosts. This survival suggests that aggressive therapy is indicated in patients with extensive fungal involvement.
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12/135. Cutaneous zygomycosis: a case report and review of Japanese reports.

    A 69-year-old man, a carpenter with idiopathic thrombopenic purpura and interstitial pneumonia, was treated with steroid pulse therapy and antibiotics. On the seventh day of steroid therapy, a conglomeration of papules, vesicles and pustules appeared in an area of the left buttock in contact with his napkin. In a Parker KOH specimen of the crust of the lesion, many non-septate hyphae were seen, and culture of material obtained by biopsy yielded rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus. ketoconazole cream was applied topically for 1 week, and the exanthema healed. After the third month of inpatient treatment, the patient's overall condition had returned to normal, and he was discharged. Cutaneous zygomycosis is a rare disease, and only 19 cases have been reported in japan. Its characteristics, as reported in these cases, have been collected and collated.
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keywords = zygomycosis
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13/135. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis treated with 32 gram liposomal amphotericin b and incomplete surgery: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: mucormycosis (or zygomycosis) is the term for infection caused by fungi of the order mucorales. Mucoraceae may produce severe disease in susceptible individuals, notably patients with diabetes and leukemia. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis most commonly manifests itself in the setting of poorly controlled diabetes, especially with ketoacidosis. CASE PRESENTATION: A 31-year-old diabetic man presented to the outpatient clinic with the following signs and symptoms: headache, periorbital pain, swelling and loss of vision in the right eye. On physical examination his right eye was red and swollen. There was periorbital cellulitis and the conjunctiva was edematous. KOH preparation of purulent discharge showed broad, ribbonlike, aseptate hyphae when examined under a fluorescence microscope. Cranial MRI showed involvement of the right orbit, thrombosis in cavernous sinus and infiltrates at ethmoid and maxillary sinuses. mucormycosis was diagnosed based on these findings. amphotericin b (AmBisome(R); 2 mg/kg.d) was initiated after the test doses. Right orbitectomy and right partial maxillectomy were performed; the lesions in ethmoid and maxillary sinuses were removed. The duration of the liposomal amphotericin b therapy was approximately 6 months and the total dose of liposomal amphotericin b used was 32 grams. Liposomal amphotericin b therapy was stopped six months later and oral fluconazole was started. CONCLUSIONS: Although a total surgical debridement of the lesions could not be performed, it is remarkable that regression of the disease could be achieved with medical therapy alone.
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ranking = 0.15317685821183
keywords = zygomycosis
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14/135. Soft tissue infection with absidia corymbifera in a patient with idiopathic aplastic anemia.

    We describe a case of primary cutaneous mucormycosis (zygomycosis) in a patient with idiopathic aplastic anemia which responded to surgical debridement and therapy with liposomal amphotericin b. The tissue removed at surgery showed dense infiltration with fungal hyphae on histopathological examination. Primary cultures of tissue on solid media were negative, but absidia corymbifera was isolated from unprocessed tissue placed in brain heart infusion broth.
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ranking = 0.15317685821183
keywords = zygomycosis
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15/135. Case report. Fatal rhinocerebral zygomycosis due to rhizopus oryzae.

    A case of rhinocerebral zygomycosis due to rhizopus oryzae, arising after trauma in a 53-year-old diabetic man, is reported. Diagnosis was based on histological and mycological examination. Fragments of the colonies were observed by scanning electron microscopy. This is the first case diagnosed in Tuscany.
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ranking = 0.76588429105915
keywords = zygomycosis
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16/135. Locally invasive cutaneous Apophysomyces elegans infection acquired from snapdragon patch test.

    Apophysomyces elegans is an environmental fungus related to other well-known agents of zygomycosis. We report a case of locally invasive A elegans soft tissue infection resulting from the application of a skin patch to test for snapdragon sensitivity. The infection was limited to skin and soft tissue, and treatment consisted of local debridement and liposomal amphotericin b. Outcome was successful.
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ranking = 0.15317685821183
keywords = zygomycosis
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17/135. Acute disseminated phycomycosis in a patient with impaired neutrophil granulocyte function.

    A 13-year-old girl with no previously known predisposing disease developed phycomycosis involving the left lung, pleura and shoulder, the left side of the neck, the left thigh, the kidneys and the brain. Prolonged amphotericin b therapy resulted in clinical improvement, but the disease was wide-spread when the patient died 5 months after debut of symptoms from a subarachnoid haemorrhage due to fungal destruction of the basilar artery. During hospitalization, a marked reduction in the bactericidal activity of circulating neutrophil granulocytes was repeatedly demonstrated and the endotoxin stimulated nitroblu tetrazolium test was negative. Together with the demonstration of granuloma formation and the accumulation of lipid-laden histiocytes in the spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow and the thymus, these findings indicate that the patient had a less severe form of chronic granulomatous disease.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = phycomycosis
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18/135. Cutaneous phycomycosis (mucormycosis) with fatal pulmonary dissemination.

    Phycomycosis of the skin manifested as a spontaneous solitary ulcer of the leg in a patient with uremia. The infection later spread to the lungs and produced fatal pulmonary infarction. Histopathologic study of the lesions revealed broad nonseptate fungal hyphae that had invaded vascular channels, with areas of necrosis and acute inflammation. Primary cutaneous phycomycosis is rare. In the studied cases, dissemination of infection did not occur. The unusual feature of fatal pulmonary dissemination of primary cutaneous phycomycosis as observed in our patient has not been described in the leterature.
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keywords = phycomycosis
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19/135. mucormycosis (zygomycosis) in a heart-kidney transplant recipient: recovery after posaconazole therapy.

    We describe the case of a diabetic patient who developed a severe invasive fungal infection due to rhizopus species postoperatively after a dual heart/kidney transplantation with subsequent intensive immunosuppressive therapy. No improvement was noted with amphotericin b (deoxycholate) therapy, but salvage treatment with the new azole antifungal posaconazole (200 mg orally 4 times daily) resulted in dramatic clinical improvement as early as 1 week after the initiation of therapy that continued through 23 weeks of treatment, with marked clinical, mycological, and radiological improvements and no adverse events.
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ranking = 0.61270743284732
keywords = zygomycosis
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20/135. mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to review other patients reported in the English literature. METHOD: A medline search for articles about mucormycosis in SLE published between 1970 and 2002 was performed by using the key words "lupus," "mucormycosis," "zygomycosis," "mucorales," "rhizopus," and "Mucor." Cases were pooled for analysis, and the mycology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of mucormycosis in SLE was reviewed. RESULTS: Eight cases of mucormycosis in SLE were identified (female:male = 7:1). The mean age at the time of infection was 31.8 /- 7.6 years and the mean duration of SLE was 6.3 /- 3.9 years. All except 1 patient had active lupus and all were receiving high-dose corticosteroids. Concomitant cytotoxic agents were used in 4 patients. Additional predisposing factors for opportunistic infection included hypocomplementemia, nephrotic syndrome, uremia, leukopenia, and diabetes mellitus. The disseminated form of mucormycosis was the most common presentation and the diagnosis often was made only at autopsy (63%). For cases with positive culture results, rhizopus was the causative species. In 4 patients, manifestations of the fungal infection mimicked those of active SLE. The overall mortality of mucormycosis was very high (88%) and, in most cases, was probably a function of delayed diagnosis and treatment. The cutaneous form appeared to have the best prognosis with combined medical and surgical treatment. CONCLUSIONS: mucormycosis is a rare but usually fatal fungal infection in SLE. Judicious use of immunosuppressive agents, a high index of suspicion, early diagnosis, and combination treatment with amphotericin b and surgical debridement may improve the prognosis of this serious infection.
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ranking = 0.15317685821183
keywords = zygomycosis
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