Cases reported "Multiple Sclerosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/121. Chronic steadily progressive central and peripheral predominantly motor demyelination, involving the cranial nerves, responsive to immunoglobulins.

    The association of central and peripheral demyelination was reported previously. Most of the cases refer to central chronic relapsing demyelination with clinical criteria for multiple sclerosis associated with later signs of peripheral nerve involvement. Other authors, described central lesions in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and in guillain-barre syndrome, as a seldom occurrence. We report a patient in which a chronic steadily progressive central and peripheral predominantly motor nervous system demyelination, involving the cranial nerves, was identified. The patient improved after intravenous immunoglobulin suggesting an immune-mediated mechanism. To our knowledge this presentation was not described before.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/121. Cranial polyneuropathies in multiple sclerosis: case report and literature review.

    Although cranial neuropathies are common disorders in multiple sclerosis patients, multiple cranial nerve involvement is an unusual occurrence. Correlation of clinical symptoms with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of demyelinating central nervous system lesions can confirm the diagnosis. The authors report on the case of a 43-year-old woman who initially was thought to have suffered a brainstem infarct but, in fact, had developed multiple cranial nerve functional deficits. Treatment of multiple sclerosis remains primarily supportive in nature, with corticosteroids used for acute exacerbations and chronic progression.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/121. Optic-spinal form of multiple sclerosis and anti-thyroid autoantibodies.

    The optic-spinal form of multiple sclerosis (OSMS), characterized by recurrent involvement of optic nerve and spinal cord with rare brain magnetic resonance imaging lesions, is relatively common among Asians. While individual cases of OSMS with anti-thyroid autoantibodies (ATABs) have been reported, the frequency of ATAbs in OSMS and classical multiple sclerosis has not been studied. We studied serum ATAbs and anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) in 46 Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis: 14 with OSMS, and 32 with non-OSMS. Six patients were positive for ATAbs: five women with OSMS and one man with non-OSMS. The frequency of ATAbs in OSMS (5/14) was significantly higher than that in non-OSMS (1/32; P = 0.007), but the frequency of ANA did not differ between OSMS (3/14) and non-OSMS (6/32; P = 0.99). There may be a pathogenetic link between anti-thyroid autoimmunity and a subgroup of OSMS in Japanese.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/121. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    The authors describe five patients with trochlear nerve palsy and MS to characterize this rare association. In two patients, trochlear nerve palsy was the initial clinical manifestation of MS. In the other three patients, this sign occurred after previous neurologic events. MRI did not identify a lesion of the fourth nerve nucleus or fascicle. ophthalmoplegia resolved within 2 months in four of the five patients. A reason this association is rare is that the fascicular course of the trochlear nerve is exposed to little myelin.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/121. intention myoclonus of multiple sclerosis, its patho-anatomical basis and its stereotactic relief.

    The typical multiple sclerosis case considered here is especially informative from both the standpoint of its clinical course and on the basis of the autopsy findings. The foci responsible for the severe bilateral intention myoclonus of the trunk and limbs are the nerve cell losses in both red nuclei due to extensive and almost complete demyelination. Thereby the triangle of Mollaret between the red nucleus, inferior olives and dentate nucleus is involved as the patho-physiological circuit responsible for myoclonus. Stereotactic coagulation of dentato-thalamic fibres resulted in complete relief of intention myoclonus. With regard to the triggering of fresh demyelinating foci by stereotactic interventions, our point of view is as follows: Although a stereotactic operation introduces the possibility of triggering new demyelinating foci in less than 10% of the cases, such a possibility does not represent an absolute contra-indication to the stereotactic treatment of action myoclonus in multiple sclerosis, if the patient is informed accordingly.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/121. optic neuritis in children.

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical characteristics of optic neuritis in children, including final visual acuity and development of multiple sclerosis (MS). methods: charts were reviewed of all patients < 15 years of age who presented with optic neuritis to the Bascom Palmer eye Institute or the Miami Children's Hospital between 1986 and 1998. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were identified. There was a slight female predilection in the study group (60%), with a mean age of 9.8 years at presentation. A preceding febrile illness within 2 weeks of visual symptoms was reported in 66% of patients. Initial visual acuity ranged from 20/15 to no light perception. Involvement was bilateral in 66% of patients, and disc swelling was present in 64% of involved eyes. Of the patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging, 33% had focal demyelinating lesions in the brain, and 63% of affected nerves were enlarged or enhanced with gadolinium. Eleven patients were treated with intravenous steroids. Final visual acuity was > or = 20/40 in 58.3% of eyes. Thirty percent of the patients had vision of finger counting or worse. Four (26%) patients developed MS. The mean age of patients with MS was 12 years, compared with 9 years in children who did not develop MS. patients with unilateral involvement had an excellent visual prognosis (100% > 20/40), but a higher rate of development of MS (75%). Two patients had positive serology for lyme disease. CONCLUSIONS: optic neuritis presents differently in children than in adults. Children typically have bilateral involvement with papillitis following an antecedent viral illness. Although visual prognosis is poorer in children than adults, the development of MS is less common in children. Children who present with unilateral involvement have a better visual prognosis; however, they also develop MS at a greater frequency than children with bilateral involvement. patients who developed MS were, on average, older at presentation with optic neuritis than those who did not develop MS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/121. Isolated sixth nerve palsy: an uncommon presenting sign of multiple sclerosis.

    We describe three patients in whom an isolated sixth nerve palsy was the only clinical symptom or sign of multiple sclerosis (MS). Data were collected prospectively over 6 years on these three patients, who showed no other signs of brainstem dysfunction or prior symptoms; in addition. Retrospective analysis of all patients with MS and all patients with sixth nerve palsy referred to a neuro-ophthalmology service between 1982 and 1998 showed isolated sixth nerve palsy to be the presenting sign of MS in only 0.5% of these patients. MS was the cause of isolated sixth nerve palsy in 0.8% of all patients and in 1.6% of those aged 18-50 years. Although it has been previously suggested that sixth nerve palsy is a not uncommon presenting sign of MS, our results suggest it is rare.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/121. multiple sclerosis and oral care.

    multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Common early symptoms include visual disturbances, facial pain or trigeminal neuralgia and paraesthesia or numbness of feet, legs, hands and arms. These, plus symptoms of spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. Increasingly a multi-disciplinary team approach is used where the individual, if appropriate his/her carer, and the specialist nurse are key figures. The dental team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/121. Central hyperacusis with phonophobia in multiple sclerosis.

    hearing disorders are a well-described symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Unilateral or bilateral hyperacusis or deafness in patients with normal sound audiometry is often attributed to demyelinating lesions in the central auditory pathway. Less known in MS is a central phonophobia, whereby acoustic stimuli provoke unpleasant and painful paresthesia and lead to the corresponding avoidance behaviour. In our comparison collective, patient 1 described acute shooting pain attacks in his right cheek each time set off by the ringing of the telephone. Patient 2 complained of intensified, unbearable noise sensations when hearing nonlanguage acoustic stimuli. Patient 3 noticed hearing unpleasant echoes and disorders of the directional hearing. All patients had a clinical brainstem syndrome. ENT inspection, sound audiometry and stapedius reflex were normal. All three patients had pathologically changed auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) with indications of a brainstem lesion, and in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demyelinating lesions in the ipsilateral pons and in the central auditory pathway. The origin we presume in case 1 is an abnormal impulse conduction from the leminiscus lateralis to the central trigeminus pathway and, in the other cases, a disturbance in the central sensory modulation. All patients developed in the further course a clinically definite MS. Having excluded peripheral causes for a hyperacusis, such as, e.g., an idiopathic facial nerve palsy or myasthenia gravis, one should always consider the possibility of MS in a case of central phonophobia. Therapeutic possibilities include the giving of serotonin reuptake inhibitors or acoustic lenses for clearly definable disturbing frequencies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/121. Horizontal monocular saccadic failure: an unusual clinically isolated syndrome progressing to multiple sclerosis.

    This paper describes an unusual clinically isolated syndrome of inflammatory demyelination that was characterized by a right VI nerve palsy and right internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO), along with an unusual form of dissociated nystagmus. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an isolated lesion within the right dorsomediolateral pontine tegmentum. Four years later, the subject developed a partial sensory transverse myelitis, confirming clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS). This paper extends the range of isolated syndromes associated with MS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Multiple Sclerosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.