Cases reported "Multiple Trauma"

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1/92. Multivascular trauma on an adolescent. Perioperative management.

    Penetrating vascular injury, in particular at the neck, is a life-threatening trauma not only of the nature and the anatomic proximity of cardiovascular, aerodigestive, glandular and neurologic system but also of the development of early and late complications. The following case report describes our experience with a penetrating wound patient, who was admitted to our emergencies twelve hours after the accident. The only demonstrable objective signs included a large hematoma at the right-side of the neck and distended mediastinum on the chest X-ray. As the patient was cardiovascularly unstable he was immediately transported to the theater without any angiography. The mandatory operative exploration was initially unsuccessful and a median sternotomy with a standard cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia circulatory arrest was established to restore all the vascular lesions. Actually, the patient was in critical condition with a rupture of the right internal jugular vein, a large pseudoaneurysm of the innominate artery and an avulsion of the ascending aorta with the suspicion of a cardiac tamponade. The postoperative period lasted two full months, while complications appeared. The substantial message from this multivascular trauma is the early diagnosis of the life-threatening complications as exsanguinations, ventricular fibrillation and the ability to minimize postoperative complications, which will impair the normal functional life of the patient.
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keywords = operative
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2/92. Transoral missile removal from the anterior C1 region following transpharyngeal missile wound.

    We present a successful treatment result in a rare case of low velocity missile transpharyngeal wound to the upper cervical area in a 33-year-old man. There are very few reports concerning related cases, with some disagreement regarding their treatment. The retained missile was successfully removed from the anterior region of the C1 vertebra through a transoral-transpharyngeal approach using the explosive transpharyngeal wound sustained. Neurological status and spine stability were not affected due to the missile's low velocity. The early soft-tissue debridement, missile removal, pharyngeal closure without wound drainage and broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage resulted in an uneventful postoperative course and good long-term outcome. Early surgery is important to prevent complications in such cases. However, the prophylactic tracheostomy, wound drainage and applying of a nasogastric tube could be left to the surgeon's judgment based on the individual patient's respiratory status, intraoperative findings and wound contamination/colonization.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = operative
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3/92. Unilateral osseous bridging between the arches of atlas and axis after trauma.

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a case report. OBJECTIVE: To present a case of osseous bridging between C1 and C2 of posttraumatic origin and with an associated closed head injury and to discuss its pathogenesis and clinical outcome after surgical resection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Heterotopic ossifications of posttraumatic origin in the spine are rare. To the authors' knowledge, no cases have been reported of spontaneous bony bridging between C1 and C2 with a posttraumatic origin. methods: Heterotopic ossifications were detected when pain and limited axial rotation (left/right 10 degrees/0 degree/20 degrees) were persistent, despite intensive physical therapy. Because heterotopic ossifications were ankylosing C1 and C2, the decision was to resect the osseous bridge in combination with a careful mobilization of the cervical spine. Functional computed tomography was performed for analysis of the postoperative results. RESULTS: Four months after surgery, clinical examination showed asymptomatic increased axial rotation. Functional computed tomography indicated that left C1-C2 axial rotation was reduced, possibly related to impingement caused by residual bony spurs. Pathologic changes in the surrounding soft tissue may be another important factor in the persistent limitation of rotation. CONCLUSIONS: Osseous bridging between C1 and C2 may be considered when persistent pain and limited axial rotation are observed after trauma. Operative resection, together with careful intraoperative and postoperative mobilization, may be the treatment of choice.
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ranking = 0.42857142857143
keywords = operative
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4/92. Traumatic cardiac herniation diagnosed by echocardiography and chest CT scanning: report of a case.

    A 62-year-old man who had suffered fractures of the left chest wall and hemothorax 1 year earlier was admitted to our hospital with multiple injuries as a result of a traffic accident. Chest drainage was immediately performed under the diagnosis of left hemothorax followed by immobilization of fractures of the femur and radius. On the second day after admission, he suddenly developed severe chest pain and dyspnea after sitting up in bed. echocardiography and chest computed tomography (CT) showed herniation of the left ventricle into the left thoracic cavity, whereby a diagnosis of cardiac herniation due to rupture of the pericardium was made and an emergency surgical repair was successfully performed. Only eight cases of patients surviving after traumatic cardiac herniation have been reported in japan; however, this is the first in which a preoperative diagnosis was made by echocardiography and chest CT scanning prior to surgical repair.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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5/92. Catecholamine dependency in a polytrauma patient: relative adrenal insufficiency?

    A 65-year-old polytrauma patient was admitted post-operatively to the intensive care unit. His situation deteriorated with hemodynamic instability and continuous high fever. An infectious focus could not be found and repeated cultures remained negative. Empirical administration of antibiotics and changing of lines did not have any effect on the clinical picture. It was impossible to lower the dose of catecholamines because of repeated occurrence of hypotension, despite optimal hydration state and filling pressures. On the 15th day of admission intravenous hydrocortisone was started on suspicion of relative adrenal insufficiency. This action resulted in rapid hemodynamic recovery, disappearance of fever and enabled rapid tapering of the dose of noradrenaline. incidence of relative adrenal insufficiency and diagnostic strategies are discussed in the population of critically intensive care patients.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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6/92. Is there a place for external fixation in humeral shaft fractures?

    There is a good indication for unilateral axial dynamic external fixation in fractures of the humeral shaft when the fracture appears in the distal third or in cases of bilateral fractures. A non-union or a posttraumatic paralysis of the radial nerve may be indications for external fixation as well as fractures associated with multiple injuries. Further indications include osteitis, infected non-union and comminuted fracture. There is maximum protection of the soft tissue with this method of treatment. External fixation combines the advantages of conservative and operative treatment by influencing callus formation by dynamizing, distraction or compression. Minimizing soft tissue damage facilitates the decision for early exploration of the radial nerve in cases of palsy. A safer positioning technique of the distal screws of the fixator is described.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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7/92. Delayed presentation of traumatic left-sided diaphragmatic avulsion. A case report.

    We describe the case of a 35-year-old man who had suffered a severe multitrauma with blunt thoracic injury, left scapula and humerus fractures 5 years earlier. At the time of the trauma, a diaphragmatic lesion went unnoticed. Five years later, the patient had a 24-h history of increasingly severe abdominal pain with repeated vomiting. Helical CT showed a portion of the left hemidiaphragm avulsed from its insertions on the ribs with large-bowel loop obstruction herniated in the left hemithorax. The preoperative CT diagnosis was confirmed by surgery: reduction of the hernia and reinsertion of the hemidiaphragm to the lumbocostal arch were performed.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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8/92. Incarcerated postraumatic intercostal lung hernia. Case report and review of the literature.

    Traumatic lung hernia is a rare diagnosis. A 52-year-old female motorvehicle passenger was admitted as a trauma patient after a motorvehicle accident. She was found to have an incarcerated lung hernia. Size of the hernia, incarceration and respiratory insufficiency mandated immediate surgical intervention with reposition, drainage and stabilisation of the chest wall. The postoperative course was uneventful. The management of the patient is discussed and the available literature reviewed.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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9/92. Pelvic fractures in pregnant multiple trauma patients.

    OBJECTIVE: To study the outcome of pelvic fractures and fetuses in pregnant patients involved in blunt multiple trauma. DESIGN: Retrospective follow-up study. SETTING: Level I trauma center. patients: Pregnant multiple trauma patients with pelvic fractures between 1974 and 1998. INTERVENTIONS: Conservative and operative treatment of pelvic fractures adapted to the clinical status of the mother. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical, functional, and social outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS: Out of 4,196 patients with blunt multiple trauma treated between 1974 and June 1998, seven demonstrated the combination of blunt multiple trauma, pregnancy, and pelvic fractures. These patients had a mean injury severity score of 29.9 points. Five mothers and three fetuses survived their injuries. All dead fetuses died on the scene. One surviving fetus was found to have hydrocephalus unrelated to the injury; the remaining fetuses had an uneventful delivery and were healthy. In two of the three patients whose fetuses survived, the treatment of the pelvic fracture was modified for the sake of fetal well-being. In all of these patients, acceptable outcome was achieved. CONCLUSION: Modification of the treatment of the pelvic fracture in pregnant women with multiple trauma may be necessary to minimize the risk of fetal injury. In our experience with these rare cases, this modified treatment did not severely alter the clinical outcome of the mother's pelvic fracture.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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10/92. Intracranial penetrating orbital injury.

    The authors report a case of double-penetrating injury of the globe with intracranial involvement from a pellet gun. A 16-year-old boy had a visual acuity of bare light perception in the left eye after being hit by a pellet. There was an inferior limbal entry site, dense hyphema, and no view of the fundus. Computed tomographic scan showed the pellet intracranially close to the left cavernous sinus. After neurosurgical clearance, the patient underwent primary closure of the corneoscleral entry site followed 3 weeks later by pars plana vitrectomy, lensectomy, and repair of a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. At 12 months postoperatively, visual acuity was 20/300 and the retina was attached. Our case demonstrates the potential for significant visual recovery in some patients with a penetrating orbital injury and intracranial involvement. Complete radiographic evaluation with neurosurgical consultation is important in the management of these patients prior to ophthalmologic intervention with possible foreign body removal. There is a need for more public awareness regarding the potentially harmful effects of pellet guns.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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