Cases reported "Muscle Neoplasms"

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1/38. pancreaticoduodenectomy for metastatic tumors to the periampullary region.

    Although operative resection of metastatic lesions to the liver, lung, and brain has proved to be useful, only recently have there been a few reports of pancreaticoduodenectomies in selected cases of metastases to the periampullary region. In this report we present four cases of proven metastatic disease to the periampullary region in which the lesions were treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy. Metastatic tumors corresponded to a melanoma of unknown primary site, choriocarcinoma, high-grade liposarcoma of the leg, and a small cell cancer of the lung. All four patients survived the operation and had no major complications. Two patients died of recurrence of their tumors, 6 and 63 months, respectively, after operation; the other two patients are alive 21 and 12 months, respectively, after operation. It can be inferred from this small but documented experience, as well as a review of the literature, that pancreaticoduodenectomy for metastatic disease can be considered in selected patients, as long as this operation is performed by experienced surgeons who have achieved minimal or no morbidity and mortality with it.
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keywords = operative
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2/38. Intramuscular hemangioma of the masseter muscle.

    Intramuscular hemangiomas (IMH) are uncommon tumors of the head and neck, but often occur in the trunk and extremities. When present in the head, the masseter muscle is the most frequently involved site, although constituting only 0.8% of all hemangiomas. Accurate preoperative diagnosis is uncommon without cytology or biopsy. A case of IMH of the masseter muscle in a 24-year-old Turkish woman is presented. Clinical, radiologic and histologic findings and treatment modalities are reviewed.
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3/38. Primary embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the diaphragm in a child: case report.

    Primary rhabdomyosarcoma of the diaphragm presenting as an epigastric mass is extremely rare, with only three published cases. We highlight the unique imaging features in a 2(1)/(2)-year-old boy which predicted the correct anatomical site preoperatively. awareness of this rare tumour and its imaging characteristics should help in differentiating it from other more common tumours in this location, especially primary hepatic tumours.
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keywords = operative
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4/38. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma: multimodal diagnosis and identification of a new cytogenetic subgroup characterized by t(9;17)(q22;q11).

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant soft tissue tumour that can be difficult to diagnose correctly, especially preoperatively. We describe four cases of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma of the extremities diagnosed by a multimodal approach. The cytological examination of fine-needle aspirates showed small and round, mildly pleomorphic cells lying in sheets and cords, but also dispersed within a myxoid and metachromatic intercellular substance. Histological, electron microscopic and immunocytochemical examination also yielded findings compatible with the diagnosis of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. cytogenetic analysis demonstrated a t(9;22)(q22;q12) in two tumours and a t(9;17)(q22;q11) in the third and fourth. The translocation t(9;22)(q22;q12) has been described repeatedly in extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma but never in other tumours; hence, the detection of this pathognomonic chromosome abnormality in short-term cultured cells from fine-needle aspirates verified the diagnosis in two of the cases. The t(9;17)(q22;q11) found in the last two cases probably represents a new cytogenetic subgroup of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma as it, too, is unknown in other contexts. The multimodal approach taken in these four cases enabled a definite diagnosis of a rare malignant tumour whose cytological and histological features alone are usually not sufficiently distinct to rule out other differential diagnostic possibilities.
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keywords = operative
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5/38. Imaging of primary rhabdomyosarcoma of the diaphragm.

    This is a report on a rare case of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma involving the diaphragm in a 3-year-old boy. This case illustrates the importance of preoperative imaging in the management of this tumor.
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keywords = operative
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6/38. Subpectoral post-traumatic lipoma.

    Although post-traumatic lipomas have been reported in various sites, a subpectoral location has, to the best of our knowledge, not previously been described. We report on the clinicopathological, radiological, intraoperative and postoperative details of a post-traumatic subpectoral lipoma in a 35-year-old black African female.
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keywords = operative
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7/38. Intramuscular hemangioma mimicking a bone tumor on plain film.

    We report a case of intramuscular hemangioma of the leg in a young man showing a bone tumor-like appearance on plain film. Correct preoperative diagnosis was obtained by MR imaging.
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8/38. Intramuscular haemangiomas: hookwire localization prior to surgical excision: report of four cases.

    BACKGROUND: Haemangiomas of skeletal muscle are a rare entity, although they are still noted to be one of the most common deep tissue tumours of the lower limb. All such lesions are benign with no recorded evidence of metastasis; but they are associated with a 17-20% local recurrence rate which is thought to be related to inadequate primary surgical excision rather than histological subtype. methods: The present case series briefly discusses the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostics, differential diagnosis and treatment modalities of intramuscular haemangiomas. The article then focuses on the recent introduction of ultrasound-guided hook-wire localization, which has enabled a great increase in complete surgical excision, resulting in much lower rates of local recurrence and a more pleasing functional and cosmetic result because unnecessary dissection is avoided. RESULTS: Preoperative ultrasound-guided hookwire localization of deep and often non-palpable intramuscular haemangiomas was very helpful in enabling a more complete surgical excision to be carried out. CONCLUSION: Hookwire localization using ultrasound guidance is an invaluable tool in directing the surgeon intraoperatively when excising deep intramuscular haemangiomas.
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keywords = operative
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9/38. Extraabdominal desmoid tumor with dissemination detected by thallium-201 scintigraphy.

    Extraabdominal desmoid tumor is a locally aggressive tumor despite being histologically benign. To avoid local recurrence, it is important to preoperatively detect the exact localization and extension of the infiltrating or disseminating lesion in this tumor. We report a case of recurrent extraabdominal desmoid tumor, which arose in the posterior thigh region, detected with Tl-201 (Tl) scintigraphy. In this case, Tl accumulated in the small disseminating lesion and to the recurrent tumor. This lesion was not identified by palpation because of its small size, deep localization and absence of symptoms, although MR imaging, which was performed after the Tl scintigraphy, clearly showed the lesion. After tumor resection, Tl did not accumulate in any region. These results suggest that Tl scintigraphy may be useful, not only for the diagnosis of extraabdominal desmoid tumor, but also for the detection of the exact localization or extension of small infiltrating or disseminating lesions before treatment.
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keywords = operative
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10/38. Unexplained systemic symptoms and gallium-67--guided decisions.

    Over 3 months, a healthy man developed prominent systemic symptoms that defied investigation. physical examination was noncontributory, and extensive studies revealed only a marked acute-phase response associated with increased serum IL-6 levels. A whole body gallium-67 scan was crucial in diagnosis, directing attention to high uptake in the left paraspinal and psoas muscles. Open surgical excision biopsy was performed, guided by intraoperative use of a gamma-probe. Removed tissue was diagnosed as diffuse, large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of muscle (stage IE), a rare extranodal lymphoma. cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) therapy was given, and the patient became asymptomatic with normal blood tests and was thought to be in remission. However, a repeat gallium-67 scan revealed recurrent multifocal disease and salvage chemotherapy was instituted. A 47,XXY karyotype (klinefelter syndrome) was later identified, possibly associated with the lymphoma.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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