Cases reported "Muscle Rigidity"

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1/17. Osmotic demyelination syndrome with two-phase movement disorders: case report.

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is characterized by regions of demyelination throughout the brain, which are most prominent in the pons. This demyelinating disease is associated with electrolyte disturbances and typically occurs in patients who are alcoholic or malnourished. movement disorders are not frequently recognized in patients with ODS. This report describes a 22-year-old woman with ODS after correction of profound hyponatremia. The main neurologic symptom was two-phase movement disorder. First, she had acute onset dystonia, then the movement disorder transformed to generalized rigidity and tremors in the delayed second phase. magnetic resonance imaging in the first phase revealed demyelinating lesions in the central pons, bilateral thalami and basal ganglia. In the second phase, the previous myelinolysis had been partially resolved. The clinical course of the two-phase movement disorder did not correlate with the resolving feature of neuroradiologic findings. During the second-phase movement disorder, the patient had a good response to propranolol and trihexyphenidyl.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tremor
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2/17. Primary brainstem injury: benign course and improved survival.

    Primary brainstem injury following head injury is a rare event. The victims often have features of supratentorial injury, and a primary isolated injury to the brainstem occurring due to shearing stresses or to injury from the tentorial edge is extremely rare. In the presence of supratentorial injury, these patients may have altered sensorium. Isolated brainstem injury may manifest itself as internuclear ophthalmoplegia, anisocoria, rigidity and cerebellar tremor. Such injuries are now being diagnosed more often due to improved imaging techniques. We treated nine such cases who had sustained primary brainstem injury in road traffic accidents, all but one of whom were subsequently independent. Primary brainstem injuries need not be associated with poor prognosis and mortality and may run a benign course with good quality of survival.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tremor
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3/17. Bilateral substantia nigra changes on MRI in a patient with encephalitis lethargica.

    A 33-year-old woman admitted for meningoencephalitis had features of encephalitis lethargica develop on her third day of illness. She had ophthalmoplegia, akinetic mutism, and prominent extrapyramidal signs consisting of lip and hand tremors, cogwheel rigidity, and facial bradykinesia.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tremor
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4/17. Parkinsonism as an initial manifestation of brain tumor.

    Parkinsonism secondary to neoplasm is uncommon. We report two patients with bilaterally symmetric parkinsonism as the initial presentation of their brain tumors. The first patient was a 71-year-old woman who presented with a gradual onset of bilateral resting tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity. Computerized tomography (CT) of the brain revealed a large parasagittal tumor in the left frontal lobe. The patient completely recovered from the parkinsonian symptoms after removal of the brain tumor. The second patient, a 74-year-old man with a history of renal cell carcinoma of the right kidney suffered from an insidious onset of bilateral bradykinesia, rigidity and gait difficulty. Cerebral metastasis was noted on the brain CT scan. Early recognition of intracranial tumor as the cause of parkinsonism is important for the management of this type of movement disorder. Moreover, brain CT scanning plays an important role in the differential diagnosis of patients with parkinsonian symptoms.
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ranking = 30.328936831331
keywords = resting tremor, tremor
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5/17. Quantitative assessment of Parkinson's disease deficits.

    OBJECTIVE: To quantitatively analyze the tremor and rigidity due to Parkinson's disease. methods: 38 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) ranging in age from 45 to 72 years and 211 normal subjects aged from 16 to 76 years were investigated. The frequency and range of tremor, the muscle tone of the upper limbs in elbow were detected by a computerized video motion detecting system and a new invented apparatus which can detects skeletal muscle tone. RESULTS: For the PD patients, the frequency of resting tremors was detected in 4 to 6 per second. For extensor and flexor in the PD patients, the value of muscle tone was higher than that of normal subjects and the value of muscle tone in flexor was higher than that of extensor. The rigidity increased gradually with repeat passive movement. The curves of rigidity were shown on computer screen or printed out. The data of rigidity were compared with the M-A Scale. A patient who was suspected to suffer from PD above by the equipments and found the muscle tone was higher than normal. In another PD patient the rigidity was obvious at one side and the muscle tone in "normal side" was also high. These equipments were used to record changes of rigidity and tremor in one more PD patient taking with different drugs in order to see the drug effect. CONCLUSION: Quantitative methods are useful to analyse the motion disorders due to PD.
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ranking = 33.328936831331
keywords = resting tremor, tremor
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6/17. Neonatal dopa-responsive extrapyramidal syndrome in twins with recessive GTPCH deficiency.

    The authors report two twin sisters, age 15 years, with recessive gtp cyclohydrolase deficiency, who presented with neonatal onset of rigidity, tremor, and dystonia but with no other symptoms suggestive of a diffuse CNS involvement. The plasma phenylalanine levels were normal. Treatment with L-dopa/carbidopa, started at age 1 year, was associated with sustained recovery from all neurologic signs. The patients were homozygous for a new recessive mutation in the GHI gene.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tremor
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7/17. Gaucher's disease with Parkinson's disease: clinical and pathological aspects.

    The association between type 1 gaucher disease and PD has been reported in the literature. The clinical picture is characterized by the predominance of bilateral akinetic-rigid signs and poor response to levodopa therapy. The authors describe four patients (two siblings) with type 1 gaucher disease presenting with the following signs of typical PD: asymmetric onset of rigidity, resting tremor, bradykinesia, and a favorable response to Parkinson therapies.
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ranking = 30.328936831331
keywords = resting tremor, tremor
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8/17. Parkinsonism in the course of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy.

    Parkinsonian syndromes may represent a complication of viral infection. Human T cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I) is a cause of a chronic myelopathy in which encephalic involvement has been also found. We report on the case of a 60-year-old man with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy, complicated with bradykinesia, resting tremor, and cogwheel rigidity. These findings suggest that parkinsonian features may represent a neurological disorder associated with HTLV-I infection.
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ranking = 30.328936831331
keywords = resting tremor, tremor
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9/17. Levetiracetam-induced parkinsonism in a huntington disease patient.

    The authors present a man with huntington disease who was treated with levetiracetam (Keppra) in an effort to reduce chorea. chorea was markedly reduced, but the patient developed parkinsonism and lethargy after 6 weeks of treatment. Symptoms consisted of resting tremor, rigidity, increased dystonia, and gait difficulty. Side effects from levetiracetam resolved completely within 7 days of levetiracetam discontinuation, and chorea returned to baseline.
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ranking = 30.328936831331
keywords = resting tremor, tremor
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10/17. An autopsy case of peroneal muscular atrophy with rigidity and tremor. Ultrastructural and systematic morphometrical studies on peripheral nerves.

    An autopsy case of hereditary peroneal muscular atrophy (PMA) with rigidity and static tremor is presented. The patient developed slowly progressive distal muscular atrophy of the legs at the age of 15 years. By the age of 52 years, PMA became marked associated with pes cavus, and tremor and rigidity of the extremities were noted. Motor and sensory conduction velocities gradually depressed and lost near the end of his life. At autopsy, the major neuropathological abnormalities involved the peripheral nervous systems, and were characterized by axonal atrophy and loss of myelinated fibers. These changes involved both the proximal and distal nerves, being more severely affected in the distal. The pathological changes in other regions of the nervous systems were mainly confined to the spinal cord, dorsal ganglia and spinal nerve roots, and pigmented neurons in the brain stem. Morphometrically, the total fascicular area was much smaller than in control, but the total number of myelinated fibers greatly outnumbered that of control 75,200 to 48,200 at the proximal sciatic nerve and then gradually decreased towards the periphery; however, even in the distal sural nerve, the total number of myelinated fibers exceeded that of control (6820 to 5469). Thus, the density of myelinated fibers were much higher, being 1.5 to 2 times greater, than in control. Its abrupt decline at the distal nerve might account for neurogenic atrophy of the distal musculature. Unmyelinated fibers were slightly increased in density and not atrophic. This case is unique in its clinicopathology and does not belong to any subtypes of PMA including "neuronal plus".
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ranking = 6
keywords = tremor
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