Cases reported "Mycobacterium Infections"

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1/147. Central line sepsis in a child due to a previously unidentified mycobacterium.

    A rapidly growing mycobacterium similar to strains in the present mycobacterium fortuitum complex (M. fortuitum, M. peregrinum, and M. fortuitum third biovariant complex [sorbitol positive and sorbitol negative]) was isolated from a surgically placed central venous catheter tip and three cultures of blood from a 2-year-old child diagnosed with metastatic hepatoblastoma. The organism's unique phenotypic profile and ribotype patterns differed from those of the type and reference strains of the M. fortuitum complex and indicate that this organism may represent a new pathogenic taxon.
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keywords = mycobacterium
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2/147. Flexor tenosynovitis in the hand caused by Mycobacterium terrae.

    The authors describe an uncommon case of flexor tenosynovitis caused by Mycobacterium terrae, an atypical mycobacterium generally considered nonpathogenic in humans. A prolonged delay in diagnosis and various ineffective therapies led to synovial biopsy and culture. After confirming the diagnosis of M. terrae, appropriate antimycobacterial chemotherapy resolved the synovitis. For chronic tenosynovitis without a clear etiology, limited synovectomy and culture are essential in establishing a diagnosis and in initiating treatment for this atypical mycobacterial infection.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = mycobacterium
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3/147. Pulmonary nodule due to mycobacterium haemophilum in an immunocompetent host.

    We present a case of a pulmonary nodular lesion in an immunocompetent patient documented at open lung biopsy to be due to mycobacterium haemophilum. This organism has recently been recognized as a cause of disease in immunocompromised patients, presenting predominantly as skin lesions, arthritis, and rarely pneumonia. Because this mycobacterium is fastidious and difficult to grow without the use of special media and conditions, our case raises the possibility that M. haemophilum could be an underrecognized cause of granulomatous pulmonary lesions and should be considered particularly in cases where smears for acid-fast bacteria are positive but cultures are negative.
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keywords = mycobacterium
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4/147. Dual infection with atypical mycobacteria and mycobacterium tuberculosis causing cervical lymphadenopathy in a child.

    The most common presentation of mycobacterial infection encountered in otolaryngological practice is cervical lymphadenitis. We report a child with an unusual cause of cervical lymphadenopathy, i.e. dual tuberculous infections. This had clinical ramifications as, initially Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare was grown in culture and was resistant to standard anti-tuberculous agents, and hence treated with excision of the lymph node. However, the cultures from the excised lymph node grew out mycobacterium tuberculosis that was sensitive to standard anti-tuberculous drugs. To our knowledge, no such presentation has been reported previously. We also review the literature on cervical lymphadenitis due to atypical mycobacteria and mycobacterium tuberculosis, with particular emphasis on clinical presentation, diagnosis and management.
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ranking = 0.00062065674731959
keywords = avium
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5/147. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus infection manifesting as fever of unknown origin and intra-abdominal lymphadenitis: case report and literature review.

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found in soil and water throughout the world. disease in immunocompetent patients usually consists of localized skin and soft tissue infections. In contrast, disseminated disease is uncommon, usually presents with rash, and almost always occurs in an immunocompromised host. We describe an unusual case of disseminated M. abscessus infection manifesting as fever of unknown origin and intra-abdominal lymphadenitis, but without rash. Our patient responded well to amikacin and clarithromycin therapy. We also review the literature related to the diagnosis and management of this uncommon disease.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = mycobacterium
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6/147. neurologic manifestations of disseminated infection with Mycobacterium abscessus.

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a ubiquitous, saprophytic organism with low pathogenic potential. The authors describe the previously unreported clinical features of meningitis and native valve endocarditis caused by this rapidly growing atypical mycobacterium. The fatal outcome of this unusual case coincides with the grim prognosis of this disseminated infection and the significant mortality rate associated with neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.
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keywords = mycobacterium
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7/147. Novel mycobacterium related to Mycobacterium triplex as a cause of cervical lymphadenitis.

    The mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is an important cause of cervical lymphadenitis in children, and its incidence appears to be increasing in the united states and elsewhere. In areas where mycobacterium tuberculosis is not prevalent, M. avium causes the vast majority of cases of mycobacterial lymphadenitis, although several other nontuberculous mycobacterial species have been reported as etiologic agents. This report describes the case of a child with cervical lymphadenitis caused by a nontuberculous mycobacterium that could not be identified using standard methods, including biochemical reactions and genetic probes. Direct 16S ribosomal dna sequencing showed greater than 99% homology with Mycobacterium triplex, but sequence analysis of the 283-bp 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence showed only 95% identity, suggesting that it is a novel species or subspecies within a complex of organisms that includes M. triplex. Mycolic acid high-performance liquid chromatography analysis also identified this isolate as distinct from M. triplex, and differences in susceptibility to streptomycin and rifampin between this strain and M. triplex were also observed. These data support the value of further testing of clinical isolates that test negative with the MAC nucleic acid probes and suggest that standard methods used for the identification of mycobacteria may underestimate the complexity of the genus Mycobacterium. ITS sequence analysis may be useful in this setting because it is easy to perform and is able to distinguish closely related species and subspecies. This level of discrimination may have significant clinical ramifications, as closely related organisms may have different antibiotic susceptibility patterns.
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ranking = 1.0012413134946
keywords = mycobacterium, avium
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8/147. Mycobacterium triplex infection in a liver transplant patient.

    Mycobacterium triplex was first named in 1996 as an acid-fast bacillus with features that most resemble Mycobacterium simiae and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex but which possesses a distinct mycolic acid pattern as well as a distinctive 16S rRNA hypervariable region. It has been isolated from lymph node, sputum, and cerebrospinal fluid specimens, but to date only rare clinical cases of this organism have been reported in the literature. The following is a case report of M. triplex that was isolated from the pericardial and peritoneal fluid of a 13-year-old female liver transplant patient.
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ranking = 0.00062065674731959
keywords = avium
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9/147. Pulmonary infection caused by an unusual, slowly growing nontuberculous Mycobacterium.

    Mycobacterium triplex, a recently described slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium, was isolated from a Finnish patient with pulmonary mycobacteriosis. The disease was successfully treated with antimycobacterial drugs. The strain isolated, which was similar to the type strain but differed slightly from the species description, was regarded as a variant of M. triplex sensu stricto. According to present knowledge this variant of the species has never been isolated before.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = mycobacterium
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10/147. Intralobar pulmonary sequestration infected with a mycobacterium of the Battey-avium complex.

    A 24-year-old man with an intralobar pulmonary sequestration infected with a Mycobacterium of the Battey-avium complex is presented and discussed.
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ranking = 0.8031032837366
keywords = mycobacterium, avium
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