Cases reported "Mycoses"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/36. myocardial infarction caused by cardiac disease in disseminated zygomycosis.

    A case of disseminated zygomycosis is described, in which myocardial infarction rather than coincident coronary or heart disease was seen at necropsy. As zygomycosis is an opportunistic fungal infection, which tends to invade blood vessels, thereby causing thrombosis and infarction, it is surprising that cardiac disease is unusual and that premortem evidence of such disease has only rarely been reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/36. Phycomycosis of the vulva.

    A necrotic ulcerative lesion of the vulva in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis initially resembled necrotizing fasciitis. debridement and histologic examination led to a diagnosis of phycomycosis. The condition responded to surgical debridement without antifungal therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 12.461201774432
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/36. Isolated cerebral phycomycosis presenting as focal encephalitis.

    A patient with features of a focal encephalitis was found to have isolated cerebral phycomycosis. No risk factors for phycomycosis were present, and the diagnosis was made by brain biopsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 74.767210646592
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/36. Rhino-orbital zygomycosis.

    A 63-year-old diabetic man presented with sinusitis with orbital and intracranial signs progressing over one week, due to zygomycosis. Despite control of the diabetes, surgical excision of infected tissue and antifungal therapy he died in the fifth week of illness. Pathological study showed extensive fungal infiltration of periorbital structures and mycotic thrombosis of many blood vessels with associated necrosis and infarction of fat and extraocular muscles.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/36. Cerebral phycomycosis.

    The incidence of phycomycotic infections of the central nervous system (CNS) remains high in diabetic and immunosuppressed patients. Despite increasing awareness of possible CNS fungal infections, the diagnosis during life remains difficult and is most often made at postmortem examination. The present report describes a histologically confirmed case of cerebral phycomycosis diagnosed in life. The findings on computed tomography as well as other radiological diagnostic procedures are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 62.30600887216
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/36. Phycomycosis of the gastrointestinal tract.

    A case of gastrointestinal phycomycosis, a highly lethal fungal infection, is presented. Radiographic, operative and histopathologic features are discussed. Pathogenesis of the disease and the importance of underlying illness, malnutrition, immunosuppression and antibiotic therapy are considered. The literature is reviewed and current approaches to diagnosis and management are summarized. Greater awareness of the clinical setting in which gastrointestinal phycomycosis may develop and earlier consideration of the diagnosis are prerequisite to improved survival.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 24.922403548864
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/36. Cranial zygomycosis caused by Saksenaea vasiformis. Case report.

    A previously healthy youth who had sustained severe head trauma and had received steroids and broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents developed a cranial zygomycotic infection with Saksenaea vasiformis. This is the first time this zygomycete has been implicated as a disease agent. Early identification of the fungal infection and subsequent vigorous medical and surgical therapy led to recovery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/36. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis treated with amphotericin b.

    Rhinocerebral zygomycosis is a rare, often fatal opportunistic fungal infection involving the cranial tissues. A diabetic patient with normal humoral and cellular immunity who was successfully treated with amphotericin b and surgery is reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/36. zygomycosis of the maxillary sinus and palate caused by Basidiobolus haptosporus.

    Basidiobolus haptosporus is known to cause subcutaneous zygomycosis in tropical africa and asia. We cared for a 49-year-old hyperglycemic, asplenic man who had never traveled outside the united states and who was seen initially for a painless palatal ulcer with cutaneous hypesthesia of the right cheek and upper lip. An invasive process involved the right middle nasal turbinate, maxillary antrum, maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve, and bony palate. Histological examination of biopsy tissue showed necrotizing granulomata with broad, nonseptate hyphae. Basidiobolus haptosporus was cultured from this tissue. Various laboratory studies revealed no immunologic defect and his lesions responded to therapy with amphotericin b. To our knowledge, this represents the first case of zygomycosis caused by B haptosporus in the americas and the first culture-documented case of invasive mycosis caused by this mold.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/36. Occurrence of subcutaneous zygomycosis caused by Basidiobolus haptosporus in brazil.

    There were described the first three South American cases of subcutaneous zygomycosis caused by B. haptosporus. The patients were children from nearby towns lying just north of 13 degrees latitude S. The diagnosis was based on histopathological aspects plus cultural isolation of the fungus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Mycoses'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.