Cases reported "Myelitis"

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1/18. paraplegia secondary to burkholderia pseudomallei myelitis: a case report.

    Bacterial infection is an uncommon cause of acute paraplegia. A 42-year-old Aboriginal man presented to a remote health clinic in northern australia with myelitis associated with burkholderia pseudomallei. He was treated with analgesia and intravenous flucloxacillin, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin and transferred to our hospital, where an urgent T12-L1 laminectomy and decompression was performed. urine culture confirmed B. pseudomallei infection (melioidosis). Abdominopelvic computed tomography revealed left prostatic lobe and right periprostatic abscesses, which were managed conservatively. The patient was given intravenous ceftazidime (8g/d) for 2 months, followed by oral sulfamethoxazole (1600mg) and trimethoprim (320mg) twice daily for 8 weeks. magnetic resonance imaging 3 weeks after his admission confirmed transverse myelitis. His rehabilitation was complicated by his difficulty in adjusting to disability, by urinary retention and fecal incontinence, by communication barriers, and his isolation from a culture familiar to him. He returned to his community after 15 weeks, free of infection, with T10-11 paraplegia and an indwelling catheter.
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keywords = urinary retention, retention, urinary
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2/18. Concurrent myelitis and guillain-barre syndrome after varicella infection.

    myelitis and guillain-barre syndrome occurring concurrently after varicella infection is very rare. A 34-year-old man presented with progressive flaccid tetraparesis, facial palsy, respiratory failure, sensory loss and urinary incontinence one week after varicella infection. Clinical, imaging and electrodiagnostic studies supported the diagnosis of myelitis and Guillain-Barre syndrome. He improved with intravenous acyclovir and gammaglobulin.
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ranking = 0.0019731074002196
keywords = urinary
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3/18. hepatitis b vaccine related-myelitis?

    We present four incidental cases that developed partial myelitis following the administration of hepatitis b vaccine in 1998. The first two cases, a 33-year-old man and a 42-year-old woman developed progressive sensory symptoms without motor involvement within 4 weeks following the vaccination. Their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed similar lesions consistent with myelitis at their cervical spinal cord. A comparable inflammatory lesion was seen at the T9-T10 levels of the spinal cord in the third case, who was a 40-year-old woman presenting with numbness in her legs and urinary retention following the vaccination. The fourth case who was a 42-year-old woman, presented with sensory symptoms in her left extremities, which developed 3 months after the vaccination. Her MRI showed a hyperintense lesion at C6. She also had two tiny lesions in her cranial MRI. In all cases, there was no history of preceding infections and no clinical evidence suggestive of any other disorders that may cause myelopathy. All patients recovered completely within 3 months with the exception of the third patient who developed new neurological symptoms after 12 months. Similar clinical and imaging presentation of myelitis following hepatitis b vaccination within a 1 year period with no other demonstrable clinical and laboratory evidence for any other disorder raise the probability of a causal link between these two events.
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keywords = urinary retention, retention, urinary
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4/18. Spinal myoclonus with dermal and retinal changes affected by myelitis.

    Intermittent, rhythmical myoclonus that had been present in the lower limbs of a 68-year-old man for more than 50 years was obviously increased in frequency during the period when the patients suffered from acute transverse myelitis. The same type of movements were readily induced by irrigation of the urinary bladder during the period of paraparesis. Removal of some possible inhibitory influences from a myoclonic focus in the lower spinal cord with resulting heightened excitability was thought to be the mechanism of these phenomena, although direct irritation of the myoclonic focus by the inflammatory process was also conceivable. The patient had keratosis palmoplantaris hereditaria and retinal pigment degeneration, suggesting the possibility of a congenital neuroectodermal dysplasia.
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ranking = 0.0019731074002196
keywords = urinary
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5/18. Transverse myelitis after lumbar steroid injection in a patient with Behcet's disease.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report. OBJECTIVE: We describe a patient who developed transverse myelitis (TM) following a nerve root injection of steroids and anesthetic at L2 for radicular pain. SETTING: baltimore, MD, USA. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 42-year-old woman developed progressive lower extremity weakness and paresthesias, a T12 sensory level and urinary urgency 8 h following the injection of Marcaine and Celestone into the left L2 nerve root. magnetic resonance imaging showed T2 signal abnormality with gadolinium enhancement from T12 to the conus medullaris and there was no evidence of traumatic injury to the spinal cord. The patient had undiagnosed Behcet's disease (BD) and had experienced multiple episodes of pathergy: hyper-responsiveness of the skin to local trauma, resulting in inflammation and edema. Intravenous steroids were initiated and the patient experienced a near total clinical resolution and a complete radiologic resolution. CONCLUSION: Since the spinal cord inflammation developed after and immediately adjacent to local spinal trauma, we suggest that the TM in this patient was related to BD and was a pathergy response in the spinal cord.
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ranking = 0.0019731074002196
keywords = urinary
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6/18. Unusual manifestations of herpes zoster. A clinical and electrophysiological study.

    The literature on complicated herpes zoster is summarized in this paper. The case histories of 18 patients with herpes zoster are presented. Two patients had encephalitis, 2 had myelitis and the other 14 patients had various types of lower motor neurone disturbance. Both patients with encephalitis--one of who developed choreo-athetosis during the illness--recovered fully. Only 1 of the 2 patients with myelitis recovered fully; the other remains severely paraparetic and the reason for her incomplete recovery may be related to the presence of generalized arteriolar disease associated with seronegative rheumatoid disease. One patient developed a guillain-barre syndrome 3 weeks after the onset of herpes zoster. Recovery in the 15 patients with lower motor neurone involvement has been slow butcomplete--or almost complete--in all but 1, a patient with persistent facial weakness as part of the Ramsay Hunt syndrome and who also had weakness of one upper limb. Seven other patients had lower limb weakness. In 2 patients the weakness was confined to abdominal myotomes and 2 other patients had urinary retention. Electromyographic abnormalities were found in the muscles which were weak and frequently also in muscles which appeared strong. It is emphasized that neurological disturbances other than sensory abnormalities may be found in patients with herpes zoster. Motor complications of various types are not uncommon.
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keywords = urinary retention, retention, urinary
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7/18. Multifocal multinucleated giant cell myelitis in an AIDS patient.

    A 19-year-old male intravenous drug abuser, was admitted to hospital with a one-week history of lower limb weakness and urinary retention. He was known to have been HIV-seropositive for 3 years and had been treated for cerebral toxoplasmosis. Neurological examination confirmed flaccid paraparesis with weak ankle jerks and bilateral extensor plantar responses. There was no obvious sensory deficit. Neurological examination was otherwise normal. CSF contained 63 mg/dl protein and 10 leucocytes/mm3. myelography was normal. He died 1 month later from septic peritonitis. Neuropathological examination showed chronic lesions of toxoplasmosis in brain. Small necrotic foci with myelin loss, proliferation of microglia, macrophages and multinucleated giant cells (MGC) were disseminated in the whole spinal cord, mostly in the white matter, but the brain was spared. immunohistochemistry demonstrated p24 and p17 hiv antigens in macrophages, MGC and microglial cells. These lesions resemble those of so called 'multifocal giant cell encephalitis'. The present case demonstrates that HIV-related multifocal inflammatory changes may be restricted to the spinal cord and may be a cause of myelopathy in AIDS patients.
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ranking = 1
keywords = urinary retention, retention, urinary
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8/18. urinary retention due to sacral myeloradiculitis: a clinical and neurophysiological study.

    We report 5 cases of sacral myeloradiculitis presenting with transient urinary retention. Neurophysiological testing, including bulbocavernosus reflex, pudendal evoked response and external anal sphincter electromyography, was performed. Parasympathetic pelvic nerves, pudendal nerves as well as the spinal cord seem to be involved to various degrees in this infrequent disorder.
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ranking = 1.1200940450323
keywords = urinary retention, retention, urinary
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9/18. Urogenital myiasis caused by Megaselia scalaris (diptera: Phoridae): a case report.

    A case of urogenital myiasis in a patient with transverse myelitis is reported from Imphal, Manipur, india. The larvae of Megaselia scalaris Lowe were recovered repeatedly from the urine of the patient and were reared to adult to facilitate identification. This is the first known case of urinary myiasis caused by M. scalaris in india.
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ranking = 0.0019731074002196
keywords = urinary
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10/18. Benign transient urinary retention.

    Three cases of acute urinary retention due to sacral myeloradiculitis are described. The authors stress the importance of diagnosing this rare and benign condition, which, in the past, has too often been mislabelled as either psychogenic or the first manifestation of a demyelinating disease.
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ranking = 5
keywords = urinary retention, retention, urinary
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