Cases reported "Myiasis"

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1/6. Orbital myiasis: a case report.

    myiasis; a term first introduced by hope refers to invasion of living tissue of humans and other mammals by the eggs or larvae of flies of the order of diptera. Orbital involvement occurs in approximately 5% of all cases of myiasis. A 72 year old patient is presented with orbital myiasis that was successfully treated by enucleation and grafted with split thickness of skin.
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2/6. Cutaneous myiasis from Dermatobia hominis.

    We present a case report of cutaneous myiasis in a foreign traveler who was infected by Dermatobia hominis while visiting south america. This patient developed a painful furuncular lesion on the anterior scalp and noted that the lesion drained a serosanguinous fluid for more than a month before definitive treatment. Invasion of mammalian tissue by the larval forms of D. hominis typically results in the formation of a classic furuncular lesion. For persons who present with a lesion that contains a central draining stoma located on an exposed body surface, the diagnosis of myiasis should always be considered. In addition to the case report, we present a discussion of furuncular myiasis and describe the peculiar life cycle of the human botfly. We also describe the various therapies that may be employed for treating cutaneous myiasis, including surgical extraction of the larva and asphyxiation of the larva by application of petroleum jelly or other fat derivatives to the central stoma or breathing aperture.
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3/6. myiasis with Lund's fly (Cordylobia rodhaini) in travelers.

    myiasis is an infestation of human tissue by the larvae of certain flies. There are many forms of myiasis, including localized furuncular myiasis, creeping dermal myiasis and wound and body cavity myiasis.1 Cordylobia anthropophaga (the Tumbu fly) and Dermatobia hominis (the human botfly) are the most common causes of myiasis in africa and tropical America respectively. The genus Cordylobia also contains two less common species, C. ruandae and C. rodhaini. The usual hosts of C. rodhaini are various mammals (particularly rodents), and and humans are accidentally infested. Figure 1 shows the life cycle of C. rodhaini, which occurs over 55 to -67 days.3 The female fly deposits her eggs on dry sand polluted with the excrement of animals or on human clothing. In about 3 days, the larva is activated by the warm body of the host, hatches and invades the skin. As the larva matures, it induces a furuncular swelling. In 12 to -15 days, the larva reaches a length of about 23 mm, exits the skin and falls to the ground to pupate. The adult fly emerges in 23 to -26 days, and the life cycle resumes. In humans, the skin lesion starts as a red papule that gradually enlarges and develops into a furuncle. In the center of the lesion an opening forms, through which the larva breaths and discharges its serosanguinous feces. The lesion is associated with increasing pain until the larva exits the skin. The disease is usually uncomplicated and self-limiting.
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4/6. Furuncular myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis, the human botfly.

    myiasis is a common travel-associated dermatosis. Travelers to many parts of Central and south america are susceptible to infestation by Dermatobia hominis. Despite the common name of human botfly, D hominis infests a broad range of mammals and is a severe pest to economically important farm animals in endemic regions. The adult female does not lay the eggs on the host. Instead, the adult female infests hosts indirectly by using blood-feeding arthropods to serve as phoretic vectors to transport the eggs. We present a patient who acquired Dermatobia when bitten by a day-active mosquito during a visit to guatemala. He had a locally painful, firm furuncular lesion with a central pore that drained serosanguineous exudates. The patient applied an occlusive ointment and recovered the larva after it emerged. In this report we discuss the life cycle of D hominis, the differential diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches.
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5/6. Human botfly larva in a child's scalp.

    The botfly is the name for several families of hairy flies the larvae of which live as parasites in the bodies of mammals. Reported are the presentation, diagnosis, and noninvasive therapy for a botfly larva in the scalp of a 14 year old.
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6/6. Ophthalmomyiasis caused by the sheep bot fly Oestrus ovis in northern iraq.

    myiasis is the feeding of fly larvae on vertebrates. The sheep bot fly larva of Oestrus ovis is a mammalian parasite of the skin, nose, ears, and eyes. When the larvae infest and feed on the structures of the eye, the condition is termed ophthalmomyiasis. Most often this infestation is limited to the external structures of the eye and is referred to as ophthalmomyiasis externa. The features of this condition are severe local inflammation, positive foreign body sensation, erythema, and lacrimation. Vision may or may not be reduced, depending on involvement of the cornea. A 20-year-old white male soldier sought treatment for an inflamed eye and an irritated cornea OS. His eyelids were swollen with marked periorbital edema and conjunctival erythema OS. On slitlamp examination, small whitish organisms were viewed on the conjunctiva OS. The organisms were removed, preserved, and sent to Nova Southeastern University where they were identified as O. ovis first-stage larvae. The patient was treated with antibiotic ointment, and the inflammation resolved within 1 week. O. ovis has a worldwide distribution, and although sheep are the preferred host, humans may also serve as an intermediate host in the organism's life cycle. This case represents one of several reports of ophthalmomyiasis in the middle east caused by O. ovis. U.S. troops stationed in iraq and surrounding areas are vulnerable to eye infestation by fly larvae, and health care providers need to include this condition in their differential diagnosis of anterior segment inflammatory disorders.
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