Cases reported "Myiasis"

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1/40. myiasis secondary to Sermatobia hominis (human botfly) presenting as a long-standing breast mass.

    A case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with a breast mass is reported. Histologically, a chronic granulomatous inflammatory response was observed. The response was associated with an organism diagnosed as a fly larva, Dermatobia hominis (human botfly). The incidence of myiasis, infestation by fly larvae, presenting as a long-standing breast mass and mimicking a neoplasm is extremely rare, especially in the united states.
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2/40. Ophthalmomyiasis and nasal myiasis in new zealand: a case series.

    We report three cases of ophthalmomyiasis in new zealand, due to the larvae of Oestrus ovis. All three patients reported eye injury caused by a fly. The larvae were removed from the conjunctival sac without difficulty under local anaesthesia. Presenting ocular symptoms of foreign body sensation, irritation, redness and photophobia all resolved swiftly. Topical antibiotic and steroid eye drops were administered. All three patients also developed nasal symptoms such as sneezing, nasal discharge and epistaxis. otolaryngology follow-up demonstrated nasal myiasis in two patients which was treated with nasal decongestants. In addition, all three patients were treated with ivermectin (Mectizan).
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3/40. Exotic myiasis with Lund's fly (Cordylobia rodhaini).

    After a four-week holiday in East africa, a woman was diagnosed with furuncular myiasis: a third-instar larva of the fly Cordylobia rodhaini (Lund's fly) was found in a skin lesion. This is the first report of exotic myiasis and importation of this species of fly into australia, and reflects the increasing risk of introducing exotic flies of public health and veterinary importance to australia.
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4/40. Nasal myiasis in an intensive care unit linked to hospital-wide mouse infestation.

    A large city hospital experienced an infestation of mice combated in part by broadcasting poisoned baits. Months later there was an invasion of flies into the hospital, and 2 comatose patients in an intensive care unit contracted nasal maggots. adult flies were trapped and maggots removed from the nares of the second patient. These were identified as the green blowfly (Phaenicia sericata). Recent downsizing of hospital personnel had led to the unintended and unrecognized loss of housekeeping services in the canteen food storage areas. A mouse infestation of the hospital occurred, with the epicenter in the canteen area. This was initially addressed by scattering poisoned bait and using rodent glue boards. The result of such treatment was the presence of numerous mouse carcasses scattered throughout the building attracting the green blowfly. adult gravid female flies trapped in the new intensive care unit (where mice were not present) laid eggs in the fetid nasal discharge of 2 comatose patients. Live trapping of mice and removal of carcasses led to an abatement of the fly infestation. The cause-and-effect nature of the mouse carcasses and flies was underscored a year later when an outbreak of P. sericata occurred in the operating department and was linked to the presence of mouse carcasses on glue boards not removed the previous fall. Hence, the disruption or loss of 1 vital link in hospital organization (in this case, housekeeping support) may lead to an unintended and bizarre outcome.
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keywords = nasal
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5/40. Ophthalmomyiasis in oman: a case report and comments.

    A case of external ophthalmomyiasis caused by the first instar larvae of the sheep nasal botfly (Oestrus ovis) has been reported for the first time from the Sultanate of oman, Southern arabia. Sixty larvae were removed from the left eye of a 21-year-old male student, who acquired the infection during a field trip. The manual removal of larvae using a swab stick was the only effective treatment. The larval characteristics are described with illustrations, and the status of O ovis ophthalmomyiasis in the middle east is discussed. The folk treatment administered for fly-mediated ophthalmomyiasis in oman is also reported. Ophthalmomyiasis may not be a serious public health problem in oman, but a nationwide survey of all myiases may be worthwhile.
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ranking = 19.172495051371
keywords = nasal
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6/40. Orbital myiasis: case report.

    BACKGROUND: Orbital myiasis cases are very rare worldwide. We are reporting this case caused by Hypoderma bovis because invasive parasitic larvae can cause massive destruction. CASE: An 85-year-old female patient was admitted to the Department of ophthalmology of the Dicle University School of medicine with the complaint of a wound in her right eye for over one year. Larvae had been in the same eye for one week. OBSERVATIONS: The clinical examination showed no light perception in her right eye. The eyelid was thickened and there was a necrotic lesion 3 x 4 cm in diameter, invading inferiorly into the upper side of the maxilla, superiorly to the roof of the orbita, medially to the lateral part of the nose, and laterally to the ossa zygomatica. Pathological examination of orbital tissue specimens confirmed basal cell carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: Orbital exenteration, total maxillectomy and graft repair were conducted in the right eye. During the six-month follow-up period, orbital tomography was performed. No recurrence or metastasis was observed.
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7/40. Ophthalmomyiasis externa: a case report.

    A three-year-old white male presented with an extremely painful abscess of the nasal portion of the right upper eyelid. A larva identified as family Cuterebridae, genus Cuterebra sp, was removed from the abscess, permitting its rapid resolution. This represents an unusual patient with external ophthalmomyiasis who enjoys excellent nutritional and environmental surroundings.
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keywords = nasal
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8/40. An unusual combination: lipedema with myiasis.

    Lipedema refers to the abnormal deposition of subcutaneous fat causing a striking enlargement of the lower extremities that is out of proportion to the upper body. Most clinicians are unaware of this disease and thus it is seldom diagnosed correctly. Cutaneous myiasis is the infestation of skin by fly larvae. We describe an unusual case of a woman with lipedema who developed cutaneous myiasis.
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9/40. Ophthalmomyiasis caused by the sheep bot fly Oestrus ovis in northern iraq.

    myiasis is the feeding of fly larvae on vertebrates. The sheep bot fly larva of Oestrus ovis is a mammalian parasite of the skin, nose, ears, and eyes. When the larvae infest and feed on the structures of the eye, the condition is termed ophthalmomyiasis. Most often this infestation is limited to the external structures of the eye and is referred to as ophthalmomyiasis externa. The features of this condition are severe local inflammation, positive foreign body sensation, erythema, and lacrimation. Vision may or may not be reduced, depending on involvement of the cornea. A 20-year-old white male soldier sought treatment for an inflamed eye and an irritated cornea OS. His eyelids were swollen with marked periorbital edema and conjunctival erythema OS. On slitlamp examination, small whitish organisms were viewed on the conjunctiva OS. The organisms were removed, preserved, and sent to Nova Southeastern University where they were identified as O. ovis first-stage larvae. The patient was treated with antibiotic ointment, and the inflammation resolved within 1 week. O. ovis has a worldwide distribution, and although sheep are the preferred host, humans may also serve as an intermediate host in the organism's life cycle. This case represents one of several reports of ophthalmomyiasis in the middle east caused by O. ovis. U.S. troops stationed in iraq and surrounding areas are vulnerable to eye infestation by fly larvae, and health care providers need to include this condition in their differential diagnosis of anterior segment inflammatory disorders.
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10/40. Human external ophthalmomyiasis occurring in barbados.

    Human infection with the sheep nasal botfly Oestrus ovis occurs sporadically. In most cases, there is a history of a strike in the eye by the adult fly. Human O. ovis has been reported rarely from the americas. We report the first case of O. ovis infection in the caribbean region, which occurred in an urban area of barbados. The patient responded to removal of the larvae from the conjunctiva and symptomatic treatment.
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keywords = nasal
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