Cases reported "Myocardial Infarction"

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1/261. Left ventricular myxoma.

    A rare development of acute inferior myocardial infarction is reported in a 23-year-old man with no previous history of cardiovascular disease. In an echocardiographic study a left intraventricular tumour was diagnosed. Cineangiographic study showed normal coronary arteries. The tumour, a myxoma, originating in the ventricular septum, was resected through the left atrium after the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve was detached. Postoperative course was uneventful and the patient remained healthy 48 months after surgery.
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2/261. myocardial infarction caused by compression of anomalous circumflex coronary artery after mitral valve replacement.

    We report a case of myocardial infarction after mitral valve replacement occurring in a patient with the left cyrcumflex coronary artery arising from the right one. The patient underwent mitral valve replacement with a size 27 Carbomedics prosthesis and a tricuspidal annuloplasty was performed according to the De Vega technique. Patient died on the 20th postoperative day.
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3/261. Concomitant coronary artery revascularization and right pneumonectomy without cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Combined coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and pneumonectomy has a high morbidity and mortality rate, especially when the right lung has to be removed. A patient is described who underwent a CABG operation through a midline sternotomy without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and a right pneumonectomy through a right lateral thoracotomy in one operative session. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which this operative strategy was employed. CABG operations without the use of CPB might put concomitant lung surgery in a new perspective.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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4/261. Unexpected transurethral resection of prostate syndrome complicated with acute myocardial infarction during transurethral incision procedure--a case report.

    Transurethral incision (TUI) is a simple and safe procedure. We, herein, present a case undergoing transurethral incision procedure during which he developed transurethral resection of prostate syndrome (TURP syndrome) and hypothermia precipitating an acute perioperative myocardial infarction attack. The potential risk of development of TURP syndrome in settings other than TURP surgery as well as its prevention are reviewed and discussed.
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keywords = operative
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5/261. Pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle progressing from a subepicardial aneurysm.

    A 56-year-old man presented with an inferior myocardial infarction and a huge pseudoaneurysm below the inferior surface of the left ventricle, which had progressed from a small subepicardial aneurysm over a 6-month period. Transthoracic echocardiography, doppler color flow images, radionuclide angiocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging and contrast ventriculography all revealed an abrupt disruption of the myocardium at the neck of the pseudoaneurysm, where the diameter of the orifice was smaller than the aneurysm itself, and abnormal blood flows from the left ventricle to the cavity through the orifice with an expansion of the cavity in systole and from the cavity to the left ventricle with the deflation of the cavity in diastole. coronary angiography revealed 99% stenosis at the atrioventricular nodal branch of the right coronary artery. At surgery the pericardium was adherent to the aneurysmal wall and a 1.5-cm orifice between the aneurysm and the left ventricle was seen. Pathological examination revealed no myocardial elements in the aneurysmal wall. The orifice was closed and the postoperative course was uneventful. Over-intense physical activity as a construction worker was considered to be the cause of the large pseudoaneurysm developing from the subepicardial aneurysm. These findings indicate that a subepicardial aneurysm may progress to a larger pseudoaneurysm, which has a propensity to rupture, however, it can be surgically repaired.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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6/261. Anesthetic management of high-risk cardiac patients undergoing noncardiac surgery under the support of intraaortic balloon pump.

    patients with severely impaired left ventricular function, an uncorrectable coronary artery disease, and a recent myocardial infarction are at high risk of cardiac complications after major noncardiac surgery. We present two patients with extensive three-vessel coronary artery disease who underwent intraperitoneal surgery under the support of intraaortic balloon pump (IABP). In one patient, the IABP was inserted urgently because of the development of chest pain with significant ST depression on arrival in the operating room, and the other patient was managed with prophylactic IABP. There were no intraoperative or postoperative cardiac events in either patient. Thus, IABP should be considered in the perioperative management of patients with severe cardiac diseases.
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ranking = 3
keywords = operative
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7/261. heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in coronary bypass surgery.

    We report on a 51-year-old man with severe two-vessel coronary disease and an ejection fraction of 15% who presented with myocardial ischemia and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia after coronary angioplasty. Before coronary bypass surgery, the antithrombin agent argatroban was used for anticoagulation and an intraaortic balloon pump was inserted. Direct coronary bypass surgery was performed to the left anterior descending artery and to the posterior descending artery using the 'Octopus' tissue stabilization device (Manfrotto, Feltre, italy). The postoperative course was uneventful and associated with normal platelet counts. The patient was discharged on the 6th postoperative day.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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8/261. Acute type A aortic dissection involving the left main trunk of the coronary artery--a report of two successful cases.

    This report describes 2 cases of a type A acute aortic dissection combined with myocardial infarction caused by a retrograde dissection into the left main trunk of the coronary artery. Successful surgical treatments, including the replacement of the ascending aorta, aortic valve resuspension and coronary artery bypass grafting, were performed in both patients, and they recovered well from cardiogenic shock. However, left ventricular function of both patients remained depressed postoperatively, which limited their quality of life. Because no definite method for salvaging infarcted myocardium has yet been established, either more timely surgery or the preoperative placement of a perfusion catheter in the left main coronary artery is mandatory.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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9/261. Sutureless technique for subacute left ventricular free wall rupture: A case report of an 85-year-old.

    This case was an 85-year-old female who developed left ventricular free wall rupture (LVFWR) of the anterior wall 13 days after an acute myocardial infarction. She was further complicated with an ascending aortic aneurysm and severe aortic regurgitation. The wall was repaired using a sutureless technique with an autologous pericardial patch and GRF glue without cardiopulmonary bypass. Although the complication of a left ventricular aneurysm was seen, the postoperative course was uneventful. Nevertheless, she is doing well 9 months after surgery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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10/261. Posterior myocardial infarction complicated by rupture of the posteromedial papillary muscle.

    A 61-year-old man was admitted with acute posterior myocardial infarction and, on physical examination, was shown to have a mitral regurgitation (MR) murmur. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed severe hypokinesis of the posterior wall and severe MR by color flow. Right heart catheterization with a balloon-tipped catheter revealed a pulmonary artery wedge pressure of 30 mmHg. No 'step-up' was seen in blood samples from the right atrium and right ventricle. On angiography, a subtotal occlusion of the mid circumflex artery was found which was angioplastied and stented. As the patient's clinical condition did not improve, he underwent transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) for further evaluation. This showed complete rupture of the posteromedial papillary muscle. The patient underwent urgent surgery with successful mitral valve replacement. The postoperative course was uncomplicated, and clinical improvement seen. This case report underscores the value of TEE in accurate preoperative diagnosis of papillary muscle rupture by providing preoperative anatomic details of the mitral valve apparatus and surrounding structures.
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ranking = 3
keywords = operative
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