Cases reported "Myositis"

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1/516. pyomyositis due to non-haemolytic streptococci.

    We present a unique case of a multifocal non-tropical pyomyositis due to non-haemolytic streptococci in a 36-y-old woman. The initial infection was in an area of contused muscle in the left anterior thigh and spread to the contralateral femoral and gluteal musculature. There was a previous history of staphylococcus aureus pyomyositis and colitis ulcerosa. The patient was treated successfully with surgical drainage and parenteral antibiotics.
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keywords = muscle
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2/516. MRI of tuberculous pyomyositis.

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to describe the findings of MRI in tuberculous pyomyositis (PM). METHOD: The MR images of four proven cases of tuberculous PM were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed with clinical and laboratory findings. The location, signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted spin echo images, presence of abscess, signal intensity of peripheral rim, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. RESULTS: On MR images, all cases demonstrated low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images in a single muscle. abscess was seen in all cases. Peripheral rim showed subtle hyperintensity on T1-weighted images and hypointensity on T2-weighted images. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was observed in all cases. cellulitis was associated in one case. The patients clinically presented with a palpable mass of long duration. CONCLUSION: Tuberculous PM shows characteristic findings of a well demarcated abscess with rim enhancement at MRI and can be distinguished from other soft tissue masses.
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keywords = muscle
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3/516. Focal, steroid responsive myositis causing dropped head syndrome.

    The dropped head syndrome, which occurs in a variety of neuromuscular disorders, is usually not due to an inflammatory process and generally either self-limited or nonresponsive to therapy. We present an 80-year-old woman who developed progressive neck weakness over a few months due to a focal and restricted inflammatory process involving the neck extensor muscles. She responded dramatically to treatment with immunosuppressive therapy.
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ranking = 1.0072860821983
keywords = muscle, neck
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4/516. Focal myositis presenting with radial nerve palsy.

    Focal myositis is a rare inflammatory pseudotumor of skeletal muscle which usually has a benign course. We report a 56-year-old woman with a painful mass in the left arm with a radial nerve palsy. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the left arm showed a mass in the triceps muscle that was suggestive of a soft-tissue sarcoma. electromyography showed a severe radial neuropathy involving both motor and sensory axons. An open biopsy showed focal myositis. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in complete disappearance of the mass clinically and by MRI, without recurrence for more than 2 years. radial nerve function also recovered completely. As a treatable cause of focal neuropathy, focal myositis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a muscle mass.
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keywords = muscle
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5/516. orbital myositis due to Kawasaki's disease.

    Kawasaki's disease is an inflammatory syndrome of young children that affects multiple organ systems. The most common ophthalmologic manifestations of Kawasaki's disease are bilateral conjunctival injection and nongranulomatous iridocyclitis. To our knowledge, this patient is the first with Kawasaki's disease to demonstrate extraocular muscle palsy and orbital myositis.
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keywords = muscle
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6/516. Visceral larva migrans and tropical pyomyositis: a case report.

    We report a case of tropical pyomyositis in a boy who presented with a severe febrile illness associated with diffuse erythema, and swelling in many areas of the body which revealed on operation extensive necrotic areas of various muscles that required repeated debridement. The patient gave a history of contact with dogs, and an ELISA test for toxocara canis was positive. He also presented eosinophilia and high serum IgE levels. staphylococcus aureus was the sole bacteria isolated from the muscles affected. We suggest that tropical pyomyositis may be caused by the presence of migrating larvae of this or other parasites in the muscles. The immunologic and structural alterations caused by the larvae, in the presence of concomitant bacteremia, would favour seeding of the bacteria and the development of pyomyositis.
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ranking = 3
keywords = muscle
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7/516. Myositis associated with a Baerveldt glaucoma implant.

    PURPOSE: To describe a case of myositis in the presence of a Baerveldt glaucoma implant. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: A 41-year-old black woman developed myositis after placement of a Baerveldt glaucoma implant. Echography demonstrated migration of the seton plate against the medial rectus muscle insertion. Myositis resolved after removal of the Baerveldt glaucoma implant. CONCLUSION: The Baerveldt glaucoma implant may have precipitated myositis in this patient.
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8/516. Muscle infections caused by Salmonella species: case report and review.

    We describe a patient with salmonella pyomyositis and review 30 other cases reported during the past 4 decades. Men outnumbered women by 2.9 to 1, and the median age of the patients was 51 years. Approximately one-half the cases were caused by salmonella enteritidis. Infected vascular aneurysms were observed in seven patients. Prior salmonella infections and local trauma or lesions were common. Diverse underlying conditions, mainly diabetes and human immunodeficiency virus infection, were present in 81% of the patients, and the psoas muscle was involved in 55% of the cases. One-third of the patients died, and relapses were common after a median time of 5 weeks (range, 4.5-27 weeks) in those who survived. Most patients had anemia, and pathogens were recovered from blood samples from two-thirds of the patients. Salmonella should be considered as a causative agent of muscle infections in the appropriate clinical setting, particularly in patients with underlying diseases or preexisting vascular aneurysms.
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keywords = muscle
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9/516. S-1 radiculopathy as a possible predisposing factor in focal myositis with unilateral hypertrophy of the calf muscles.

    Associated with chronic S-1 radiculopathy, a 44-year-old man developed unilateral hypertrophy of the calf muscles. electromyography revealed neurogenic alterations in the corresponding limb compatible with S-1 radiculopathy. In addition, MR-tomographic and bioptic findings were consistent with a focal inflammatory myopathy of the enlarged right gastrocnemius muscle. Predisposing factors for the localisation of a focal myositis are unknown. This case report highlights the diagnostic difficulties in distinguishing focal myositis and denervation hypertrophy following S-1 radiculopathy or secondary inflammation related to denervation. We consider the possibility that in our case the inflammatory process might have been triggered by electromyographically proven chronic denervation related to radiculopathy.
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ranking = 6
keywords = muscle
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10/516. An outbreak of acute eosinophilic myositis attributed to human sarcocystis parasitism.

    Seven members of a 15-man U.S. military team that had operated in rural malaysia developed an acute illness consisting of fever, myalgias, bronchospasm, fleeting pruritic rashes, transient lymphadenopathy, and subcutaneous nodules associated with eosinophilia, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and elevated levels of muscle creatinine kinase. Sarcocysts of an unidentified sarcocystis species were found in skeletal muscle biopsies of the index case. albendazole ameliorated symptoms in the index case; however, his symptoms persisted for more than 5 years. Symptoms in 5 other men were mild to moderate and self-limited, and 1 team member with laboratory abnormalities was asymptomatic. Of 8 team members tested for antibody to sarcocystis, 6 were positive; of 4 with the eosinophilic myositis syndrome who were tested, all were positive. We attribute this outbreak of eosinophilic myositis to accidental tissue parasitism by sarcocystis.
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keywords = muscle
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