Cases reported "Nasopharyngeal Diseases"

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1/5. High fever. Experience in private practice.

    Experience with confirmed high fever, 40 C (104 F) or more, in a private practice during 14 years is presented. The records of 1,500 patients covering 8,000 patient years disclosed only 108 confirmed episodes of high fever. Eleven diagnostic categories included 149 diagnoses. Fourteen of 43 roentgenographic examinations yielded positive findings, including two cases of pneumonia not detected on physical examination. Two of six stool cultures yielded specific enteric pathogens. Convulsions occurred in 12 of the 108 episodes of high fever, and recurred only once in one child. There were no deaths in this series of children with high fevers. Only one diagnosis, pneumonia, was significantly more frequent in confirmed high fever than in unconfirmed high fever. Lastly, the ability of a group of mothers to read thermometers set at three different temperatures proved to be surprisingly good.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fever
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2/5. tuberculosis of the nasopharynx: a rare entity revisited.

    OBJECTIVES: tuberculosis of the nasopharynx is uncommon. A large series of 17 cases is reported, and the clinical and pathological features are discussed. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective review. methods: Seventeen archived cases of biopsy-proven nasopharyngeal tuberculosis were reviewed for patient age and sex, presenting complaint and duration, systemic symptoms, cervical lymphadenopathy, and chest x-ray findings. These findings were compared with a compilation of 40 cases reported in the English literature. RESULTS: There was a female predominance (13 women and 4 men), with age range of 20 to 74 years (mean age, 38 y). The most common presentation was enlargement of the cervical lymph nodes (53%), followed by hearing loss (12%), tinnitus, otalgia, nasal obstruction, and postnasal drip (6% each). The duration of the presenting symptoms ranged from 1 week to 1 year (mean duration, 16 wk). Ten patients (59%) had cervical lymphadenopathy, two (12%) had systemic symptoms (fever, weight loss, night sweats), and one patient (6%) had miliary pulmonary tuberculosis. Direct endoscopic examination showed nasopharyngeal mucosal irregularity or mass in the majority of patients (12 patients [70%]). These features were similar to those reported in the literature. CONCLUSIONS: Nasopharyngeal tuberculosis is uncommon, usually occurring without pulmonary or systemic involvement. Cervical lymphadenopathy occurs in more than half of the patients and is the most common presenting complaint; this, together with the nasopharyngeal findings of mass or mucosal irregularity, makes differentiation from carcinoma on clinical examination difficult, necessitating histological evaluation.
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ranking = 0.1
keywords = fever
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3/5. Successful treatment of rhinomaxillary form of mucormycosis infection after liver transplantation: a case report.

    mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic infection, usually associated with immunocompromised states. Several conditions such as hematologic malignancy (leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma), solid organ transplantation, diabetes mellitus, corticosteroid therapy, or chemotherapy predispose patients to infection. The aim of this study was to present a single case of mucor infection after 900 consecutive liver transplantations. Rhinomaxillary mucormycosis must be suspected in a transplant recipient showing fever, maxillary swelling, and edema. This condition can be successfully treated with early diagnosis and a combination of aggressive surgery and antifungal therapy.
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ranking = 0.1
keywords = fever
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4/5. infectious mononucleosis in the nasopharynx with a histological picture of malignant lymphoma.

    The present report describes the case history of an 8-year-old girl with a suspected malignant lymphoma of the nasopharynx that was subsequently proven to be due to infectious mononucleosis. The literature is reviewed.
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ranking = 1720.6031254768
keywords = infectious mononucleosis, mononucleosis
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5/5. Nasopharyngeal obstruction in infectious mononucleosis.

    Obstruction of the upper respiratory tract is an alarming and serious manifestation of infectious mononucleosis. The physician must distinguish this disease from other causes of upper airway obstruction. The presence of nasal obstruction by viscous secretions can aid in establishing the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis. Steroid therapy should be initiated as soon as respiratory obstruction is apparent and infectious mononucleosis is suspected.
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ranking = 7014.805829525
keywords = infectious mononucleosis, mononucleosis
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