Cases reported "Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/11. Spontaneous epidural haematoma associated with radiation-induced malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

    We report a case of spontaneous epidural haemorrhage associated with metastatic radiation-induced malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the dural meninges in a patient who had been previously treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with radiotherapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/11. Temporal approach for resection of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a lateral preauricular temporal approach for resection of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective review of five patients with JNA tumors that were resected by a lateral preauricular temporal approach. methods: The medical records of five patients who underwent resection of JNA tumors via a lateral preauricular temporal approach were reviewed, and the following data collected: tumor extent, blood loss, hospital stay, and surgical complications. RESULTS: Five patients with JNA tumors had resection by a lateral preauricular temporal approach. These tumors ranged from relatively limited disease to more extensive intracranial, extradural tumors. Using the staging system advocated by Andrews et al., these tumors included stages II, IIIa, and IIIb. Four patients (stages II, IIIa, IIIa, and IIIb) who underwent primary surgical excision had minimal blood losses and were discharged on the first or third postoperative day with minimal transient complications (mild trismus, frontal branch paresis, serous effusion, and cheek hypesthesia). The remaining patient (stage IIIb) did well after surgery, despite having undergone preoperative radiation therapy and sustaining a significant intraoperative blood loss. There have been no permanent complications or tumor recurrences. CONCLUSIONS: A lateral preauricular temporal approach to the nasopharynx and infratemporal fossa provides effective exposure for resection of extradural JNA tumors. The advantages of this approach include a straightforward route to the site of origin, the absence of facial and palatal incisions, and avoidance of a permanent ipsilateral conductive hearing loss.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 272.59216772778
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/11. Endovascular treatment of radiation-induced petrous internal carotid artery aneurysm presenting with acute haemorrhage. A report of two cases.

    Haemorrhage from rupture of petrous ICA aneurysm can be life threatening and emergency treatment is required. We report 2 cases of radiation-induced petrous internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm presenting with acute haemorrhage (epistaxis and otorrhagia) after radiotherapy (RT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Both patients had a history of RT treatment for NPC. The first patient, a 54-year-old man, presented with sudden severe epistaxis and haemorrhagic shock. The second patient, a 35-year-old man, presented with episodes of severe otorrhagia. The first patient was immediately resuscitated. Obliteration of the aneurysm was performed by endovascular occlusion of the ICA with Guglielmi detachable coils and fibered platinum coils. For the second patient, the aneurysm was treated by deploying a self-expandable stent across the aneurysm neck. In an emergency situation, ruptured petrous ICA aneurysm can be treated with endovascular occlusion of the ICA with microcoils if there is a good collateral blood flow. Alternatively, the aneurysm can be treated by deployment of a stent, which can induce stasis and eventual thrombosis of the aneurysm.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/11. Endoscopic laser-assisted excision of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas.

    BACKGROUND: Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs) are highly vascular tumors that originate in the nasopharynx of young males. The primary treatment is surgical excision. Traditional surgical approaches are associated with significant morbidity and facial deformity. We introduce and outline the clinical advantages of an endoscopic surgical approach to JNAs using the Nd:YAG laser with image-guided surgery. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: Tertiary care medical center. patients AND methods: Our study included 5 male patients (age range, 8-21 years) with extensive JNAs. Their tumors were large and ranged from Fisch stage IIA to IIIA. Embolization of tumor-feeding vessels was performed before surgery. The tumors were photocoagulated via a transnasal endoscopic approach using a Nd:YAG laser. Devascularized, lased tumor was removed with a microdebrider. Image-guided navigation systems were used to assist skull base tumor removal, and sublabial and buccolabial incisions were used as needed to gain lateral endoscopic tumor access. Endoscopic tumor margins were obtained for frozen section. RESULTS: All patients achieved symptomatic remission, with no complications. No blood transfusions were necessary. The patients were ready for discharge 1 to 2 days after surgery. Postoperative and magnetic resonance imaging scans showed 2 skull base recurrences, which were removed endoscopically. Follow-up ranged between 2 and 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Traditional external surgical approaches to large JNAs may result in significant morbidity. Laser-assisted image-guided endoscopic excision of JNAs is a safe and effective minimally invasive surgical treatment. Its distinct advantages include (1) diminished blood loss, (2) superior cosmesis without observed altered facial growth, (3) direct access of skull base with minimal morbidity, and (4) ease of endoscopic follow-up.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 90.864055909258
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/11. Management of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    Successful surgical treatment of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma requires complete pre-operative evaluation and careful choice of a suitable surgical approach. Experience with 12 patients presenting with this tumor demonstrates the value of polytomography and angiography in evaluation. The use of pre-operative estrogens and temporary vessel ligation has decreased blood loss. The surgical approach is modified depending upon tumor location. A tumor confined to the nasopharynx is removed by a transpalatal approach. Extension into the sinuses or orbit necessitates a sublabial incision or lateral rhinotomy. Pterygo-maxillary tumor may be exposed by extension of the sublabial incision posterior to the maxillary tuberosity. This allows one to push the tumor back into the nasopharynx. Intracranial extension is removed by a combined otolaryngologic-neurosurgical approach.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 90.864055909258
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/11. Do angiomas of the nasal septum exist?

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNA) by definition originate in the nasopharynx. Vascular tumors arising in the nasal cavity can easily be mistaken for JNA, when the correct diagnosis is hemangioma or angiofibromatous polyp. We present a case that illustrates this problem, an 11-year-old boy with a unilateral anterior nasal cavity mass associated with recurrent epistaxis. At surgery, the mass was found to arise from the anterior nasal septum and was removed easily with minimal bleeding. The initial pathologic interpretation was JNA. After extensive review of the specimen, however, the diagnosis of hemangioma was made. Similar tumors have been reported as being JNA that have been simple to remove with minimal blood loss. JNA is associated with more severe blood loss, is more difficult to expose surgically and has a higher risk of recurrence than other nasal tumors. Therefore, JNA needs to be distinguished from anterior nasal cavity masses.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 181.72811181852
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/11. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma presenting as a facial swelling. A case report.

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare benign neoplasm occurring almost exclusively in adolescent males. When it is confined to the nasopharynx, surgery is often curative. In 20% of cases, there is intracranial extension, and radiotherapy may be used to avoid the risk of life-threatening haemorrhage. The authors report an unusual case which presented with a swelling of the cheek and an abducens nerve palsy. The lesion extended from the nasopharynx across the pterygomaxillary fissure, as well as intracranially. radiotherapy was given, and the patient remains disease-free after one year.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/11. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    JNA is a highly vascular, benign, yet locally invasive tumor that occurs in preadolescent males. diagnosis is based on history, physical examination, and radiographic findings. CT scanning is invaluable for evaluating tumor extent. angiography combined with embolization aids surgeons in identifying the main feeding vessels and decreasing intraoperative blood loss. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy with radiation therapy reserved for inoperable masses. For highly aggressive, recurrent angiofibroma, chemotherapy has shown some promise.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 90.864055909258
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/11. Pre-operative embolization of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas with gelfoam.

    Two patients with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas are presented. Different haemorrhage-reducing operative methods were used. The cases illustrate the hazards of permanent ligation of the external carotid artery and the advantage of pre-operative embolization with absorbable Gelfoam.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/11. Oronasal fistula--a possible complication of preoperative embolization in the management of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    Oronasal fistula, a possible complication of pre-operative embolization in the management of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, is presented and discussed. In spite of this possible complication the embolization procedure is justified because of the tremendous reduction of blood loss during the operation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 90.864055909258
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.