Cases reported "Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms"

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11/185. Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma of the nasopharynx. Case report and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: The polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma of the nasopharynx is a rare disease. Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma is a minor salivary gland neoplasm which occurs frequently in the mucosa of the soft and hard palates, in the buccal mucosa and in the upper lip. To date this entity has been identified within the oral cavity and only one case within the nasopharynx and some cases in the parotid gland. It has a slow infiltrating growing pattern with frequent perineural invasion and low metastatic potential. CASE REPORT: We report on a patient with non-papillary polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma in the nasopharynx which extended intracranially. The patient underwent primary radiotherapy. The CT showed partial response to radiotherapy and the patient is alive 51 months after the diagnosis his state being unchanged. CONCLUSION: The treatment for minor salivary gland tumor is primarily surgical. It is reported that the polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma has been known to have poor response to radiotherapy. However, we believe that in addition to its favorable biological behavior, the radiotherapy in this localization may result in longer survival.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neoplasm
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12/185. Carcinoma of the nasopharynx and nasa fossa: report of case.

    A brief history of a case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is described. A general discussion of the problems of diagnosis, treatment, and classification of the more frequent histologic type is presented. Currently, the most favorable prognosis is in patients in whom the condition is detected early. This serious disease sometimes occurs near or adjacent to the area of the dentist's primary responsibility. The dentist should always assume his professional responsibility by promptly referring any patient with suspected cancer to an appropriate specialist.
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ranking = 0.18905437453627
keywords = cancer
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13/185. Epstein-Barr virus early ribonucleic acids as a diagnostic adjunct for relapsed metastatic tumors in patients with cured primary undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PURPOSE: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been consistently shown to be associated with undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this article, the authors attempt to detect Epstein-Barr virus in distant relapsed metastatic sites in undifferentiated NPC patients with cured primary cancer. MATERIALS AND methods: in situ hybridization (ISH) technique is a reliable method to detect EBV early RNAs (EBERs) within NPC cells. We used a nonisotopical ISH technique to examine the presence of EBERs in paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from 1 paired specimen of primary NPC and its metastatic counterpart at liver and 2 metastatic specimens of retroperitoneal lymph nodes and bone. RESULTS: All the primary lesions and the metastatic tumors of NPC with undifferentiated histology contained EBERs that could be clearly detected in the nuclei of cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS: This article shows that EBERs can be successfully detected in cells of the distant relapsed metastatic sites. These results suggest that this nonisotopical ISH method of EBERs can be potentially used to diagnose NPC patients developing distant relapsed metastatic lesions with cured primary cancer early. It can offer quick information as to institute suitable salvage chemotherapy for these patients.
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ranking = 0.56716312360882
keywords = cancer
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14/185. Delayed radiation-induced bulbar palsy mimicking ALS.

    We describe a patient presenting with progressive bulbar dysfunction and spasticity that clinically mimicked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). electromyography, however, showed no evidence of denervation and revealed a rare combination of peripheral and central myokymia. We feel that this pattern of myokymia represented a marker of neural injury from remote radiation therapy. nervous system disorders resulting from therapeutic radiation are described, and potential pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying myokymia are discussed.
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ranking = 163.10278040291
keywords = radiation-induced
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15/185. Alteration of cellular mediated cytotoxicity, T cell receptor zeta (TcR zeta) and apoptosis related gene expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients: possible clinical relevance.

    We have investigated apoptosis related gene expression in tumour cells, phenotype and function of blood mononuclear cells at diagnosis in relation to clinical response in three patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We have focused our study on the Epstein Barr virus latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) and Bcl-2 expression in the tumour cells, the essential signal-transducing zeta molecule of T cell receptor (TcR zeta) and cellular mediated cytolysis of the blood mononuclear cells. The carcinoma cells of the patients were Bcl-2 negative. They were heterogeneous with regard to the expression of LMP-1 and the number of proliferating or apoptotic cells. Decrease in the expression of mature T cells (CD3, CD4, and CD8), TcR zeta and cellular mediated cytotoxicity was detected in blood mononuclear cells of the patients. IL-2 up-regulated these phenotypes and the cytolytic capacity of the blood mononuclear cells. The patient with LMP-1 negative carcinoma cells, down-regulated TcR zeta expression and impaired IL-2 mediated cytolysis, had the worst clinical outcome. Another patient with low apoptotic, highly proliferating and LMP-1 positive carcinoma cells had recurrent disease only in the irradiated area. Interestingly, NPC with high apoptotic and few LMP-1 expressing cells was detected in the patient with a normal level of TcR zeta expression and cytolytic functions in blood mononuclear cells at the time of diagnosis. After combination treatment with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, this patient is still alive with complete remission and disease-free at 36 months. Suppression of the immunological functions may occur in NPC patients. Our study suggests that the immunological functions and apoptosis related gene expression in the carcinoma cells may be used as prognostic factors and help in the decision of therapy of patients with nasopharyngeal cancer.
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ranking = 0.18905437453627
keywords = cancer
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16/185. Cranial neuropathy following curative chemotherapy and radiotherapy for carcinoma of the nasopharynx.

    Cranial nerve damage following head and neck radiotherapy is an unusual event. Cranial neuropathy following concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy is unreported. The authors report a case of a 54-year-old man treated with curative chemotherapy and radiotherapy for a stage III nasopharyngeal carcinoma who developed an unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy five years after therapy. Follow-up examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show no evidence of recurrent disease. hypoglossal nerve injury occurring after head and neck radiotherapy is an indirect effect due to progressive soft tissue fibrosis and loss of vascularity. This process develops over years leading to nerve entrapment and permanent damage. Cranial nerve palsies, including damage to the hypoglossal nerve, can develop years after therapy with no evidence of tumour recurrence. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy have improved progression-free and overall survival in advanced nasopharyngeal cancer. As more patients achieve long-term tumour control following chemotherapy and radiotherapy, we must be cognizant of potential late injury to cranial nerves.
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ranking = 0.18905437453627
keywords = cancer
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17/185. Metastatic tumors in the sellar and parasellar regions: clinical review of four cases.

    Metastatic tumors in the sellar and parasellar regions are uncommon and rarely detected in clinical practice. We present four cases of sellar and parasellar metastatic tumors, which metastasized from distant organ in one case and extended directly from adjacent structures in three. Common presenting symptoms were cranial neuropathies, headache and facial pain. Invasion into the cavernous sinus was noted in all cases. We report rare cases of sellar and parasellar metastases. Also, we should consider the possibility of metastasis in these regions for patients who showed the above clinical presentations in systemic cancer patients. In extensive diseases, transient symptomatic relief could be obtained by direct surgical management, even in restricted degree.
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ranking = 0.18905437453627
keywords = cancer
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18/185. Late sequelae of radiation therapy in cancer of the head and neck with particular reference to the nasopharynx.

    Sequlae of radiation therapy may be late in occurring and varied in their manifestations. Although some are untreatable and progressive, the risk of development of some other sequelae can be minimized by careful application of radiotherapy or by ancillary measures, such as dental decay prophylaxis. Some of the serious sequelae secondary to radiation therapy of the nasopharynx have been summarized. These include radiation myelitis, paralysis of the cranial nerves, stricture of the pharynx, radiation-induced cancer, and necrosis with fatal hemorrhage.
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ranking = 41.720966973409
keywords = radiation-induced, cancer
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19/185. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a boy with fragile x syndrome.

    The authors report on what they believe to be the first case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a patient with fragile x syndrome. In the literature, a few cases of fragile x syndrome associated with malignancies are described. Although this association seems more than coincidental, the molecular correlation between this syndrome and cancer is yet unclear.
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ranking = 0.18905437453627
keywords = cancer
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20/185. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy: an unusual manifestation in nasopharyngeal cancer.

    A patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma developed clubbing and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy 6 months before radiological detection of secondary deposits in the lung. Another patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma developed digital clubbing and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy 6 months after the discovery of lung metastases. Development of a paraneoplastic syndrome in the form of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and digital clubbing is very rare. This manifestation of nasopharyngeal cancers is presented, with a short review of its biology and pathogenesis.
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ranking = 0.94527187268137
keywords = cancer
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