Cases reported "Nausea"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/11. Rabbitfish ("aras"): an unusual source of ciguatera poisoning.

    BACKGROUND: ciguatera poisoning is the commonest fish-borne seafood intoxication. It is endemic to warm water tropical areas and is caused by consumption of bottom-dwelling shore reef fish, mostly during spring and summer. The causative agent, ciguatoxin, is a heat-stable ester complex that becomes concentrated in fish feeding on toxic dinoflagellates. The common clinical manifestations are a combination of gastrointestinal and neurologic symptoms. Severe poisoning may be associated with seizures and respiratory paralysis. OBJECTIVE: To describe a series of patients who sustained ciguatera poisoning in an uncommon region and from an unexpected source. patients: Two families complained of a sensation of "electrical currents," tremors, muscle cramps, nightmares, hallucinations, agitation, anxiety and nausea of varying severity several hours after consuming rabbitfish ("aras"). These symptoms lasted between 12 and 30 hours and resolved completely. The temporal relationship to a summer fish meal, the typical clinical manifestations along with the known feeding pattern of the rabbitfish suggested ciguatera poisoning. CONCLUSIONS: The Eastern Mediterranean basin is an unusual region and the rabbitfish an unusual source for ciguatera poisoning. There are no readily available and reliable means for detecting ciguatoxin in humans. A high index of suspicion is needed for diagnosis and a thorough differential diagnosis is essential to eliminate other poisonings, decompression sickness and encephalitis. Supportive therapy is the mainstay of treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sickness
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/11. The iowa follow-up of chemically sensitive persons.

    Clinical symptoms and self-reported health status in persons reporting multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) are presented from a 9-year follow-up study. Eighteen (69%) subjects from a sample of 26 persons originally interviewed in 1988 were followed up in 1997 and given structured interviews and self-report questionnaires. In terms of psychiatric diagnosis, 15 (83%) met DSM-IV criteria for a lifetime mood disorder, 10 (56%) for a lifetime anxiety disorder, and 10 (56%) for a lifetime somatoform disorder. Seven (39%) of subjects met criteria for a personality disorder using the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-IV. Self-report data from the illness behavior Questionnaire and Symptom checklist-90-Revised show little change from 1988. The 10 most frequent complaints attributed to MCS were headache, memory loss, forgetfulness, sore throat, joint aches, trouble thinking, shortness of breath, back pain, muscle aches, and nausea. Global assessment showed that 2 (11%) had "remitted", 8 (45%) were "much" or "very much" improved, 6 (33%) were "improved", and 2 (11%) were "unchanged/worse". Mean scores on the SF-36 health survey showed that, compared to U.S. population means, subjects reported worse physical functioning, more bodily pain, worse general health, worse social functioning, and more emotional-role impairment; self-reported mental health was better than the U.S. population mean. All subjects maintained a belief that they had MCS; 16 (89%) acknowledged that the diagnosis was controversial. It is concluded that the subjects remain strongly committed to their diagnosis of MCS. Most have improved since their original interview, but many remain symptomatic and continue to report ongoing lifestyle changes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0049231364972204
keywords = motion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/11. Intractable vomiting in diabetic patients.

    Intractable nausea and vomiting have been described in individuals without any underlying physical etiology explaining these complaints. Physical or emotional abuse has been described in individuals suffering from these symptoms and associated with somatoform disorders manifesting primarily as gastrointestinal complaints. We present five patients with long-standing Type 1 diabetes who suffered from intractable vomiting. personality disorders, profound depression and emotional abuse dramatically influenced the course of these patients' illness. In most of the patients, physical symptoms remarkably improved after identification and removal of the triggering factors. Therefore, psychogenic vomiting must be considered among the differential diagnoses of intractable nausea and vomiting, especially in individuals with chronic illnesses. A careful search for a physical etiology and medical treatment that does not cause relief of symptoms should suggest that there is almost certainly a psychological issue at the root of the problem.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0098462729944407
keywords = motion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/11. Weber's syndrome and sixth nerve palsy secondary to decompression illness: a case report.

    We describe the first case of Weber's syndrome to present as a manifestation of decompression illness in a recreational scuba diver. Weber's syndrome is characterized by the presence of an oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral hemiparesis. The patient was a 55 year-old male with a past medical history of a pulmonary cyst, in whom symptoms developed after a multilevel drift dive to a depth of 89 feet for 53 minutes, exceeding no-decompression limits. Symptom onset was within 30 minutes of surfacing and included the Weber's syndrome, a sixth nerve palsy, dizziness, nausea, sensory loss, and ataxia. The patient received four U.S. Navy Treatment tables with complete resolution of all neurological signs and symptoms. The mechanism of injury remains unclear, but may involve aspects of both air gas embolism and decompression sickness. Individuals with pre-existing pulmonary cysts may be at increased risk for dive-related complications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sickness
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/11. U.S. navy diver/aviator/skydiver with AGE from a previously unknown PFO.

    A 32 year old US Naval aerospace physiologist with dive, jump and flight qualifications presented to a US Navy hyperbaric medicine department complaining of nausea, unsteadiness and left hand and forearm paresthesia that began almost immediately after completing a 28ft/ 40min recreational dive. Following an abbreviated history and physical examination the patient was diagnosed to be suffering from an arterial gas embolism. He was treated with hyperbaric therapy during which his symptoms resolved. Follow-on transesophageal echocardiography revealed an atrial septal aneurysm with a patent foramen ovale resulting in a right-to-left shunt after valsalva maneuver, but no evidence of ventricular dysfunction, wall motion abnormalities, or abnormal ejection. His episode was attributed to paradoxical air embolism and he was disqualified from further special duty. In order to regain his dive, jump and flight qualifications, the patient elected to undergo repair of the cardiac defect with a device that is relatively new in the operational military setting. The procedure was a success, he was granted waivers for his prior qualifications, and remains in that status to this day. This is the first known case where an atrial septal occluder has been used to preserve these special duty qualifications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0049231364972204
keywords = motion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/11. psychotherapy during radiotherapy: effects on emotional and physical distress.

    The authors determined the effects of ongoing weekly individual psychotherapy on the symptoms of patients undergoing a 6-week course of radiotherapy for cancer. Forty-eight patients were given weekly psychotherapy sessions for 10 weeks; another 52 patients served as control subjects. A statistically significant reduction was found in both emotional and "physical" manifestations of distress in the patients receiving psychotherapy compared with the control group. This was true regardless of gender, ward or private patient status, or knowledge of diagnosis. Patient gender and knowledge of diagnosis did affect the pattern and magnitude of the response to psychotherapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.024615682486102
keywords = motion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/11. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IP) is an uncommon disorder of gut motility which must be differentiated from mechanical intestinal obstruction. We have seen 11 such patients over the last 5 years. Characteristic symptoms, shared by mechanical obstruction, include abdominal distention and pain, nausea, and vomiting. Radiologic studies reveal dilated loops of bowel with air fluid levels. In most patients a major differentiating feature from obstruction may be the presence of diarrhea rather than obstipation. steatorrhea is secondary to an overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria in the motionless dilated loops of bowel. IP has been associated with various disorders: in our series two patients had scleroderma, one multiple small bowel diverticula, one systemic amyloidosis, one celiac disease, and one spinal cord injury; in only two patients was the disorder considered "idiopathic." Three patients had previously undergone a jejuno--ileal bypass for morbid obesity. During the acute episode, the patients were treated symptomatically with decompression by nasogastric or rectal tube with fluid and electrolyte replacement. Malabsorption treated with broad spectrum antibiotics reversing the steatorrhea but not episodes of pseudo-obstruction. magnesium deficiency was present in seven patients and its correction resulted in amelioration of the symptom complex. In two patients episodes of pseudo-obstruction were markedly reduced by metoclopramide which was not effective in two others.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0049231364972204
keywords = motion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/11. motion sickness: part III--a clinical study based on surgery of posterior fossa tumors.

    Three patients who had large, benign cerebellar tumors were operated upon in the sitting position and developed symptoms referable to the temporoparieto-occipital region of the brain 24-48 h postoperatively. They consisted of dizziness, nausea, vomiting, formed and unformed hallucinations, and inversion of image or disorientation in space, some of which were experienced by some of the astronauts and cosmonauts during space flight. Such findings are not due to stimulation of the cerebellum, the site of the lesion, but must come from the cerebral hemisphere. The symptoms were believed to be caused by "the luxury perfusion" of Lassen with the development of local lactic acidosis secondary to vascular insufficiency to the brain in the distribution of the posterior cerebral artery thus stimulating the temporoparieto-occipital region. This theory is suggested to some degree by the work of Endo et al. using CT scans, which showed the shifting of increased blood flow from the frontal region to the temporoparieto-occipital region following removal of a benign posterior fossa tumor. The mechanism for the compression of the posterior cerebral artery may be due to uncal herniation at the tentorium. The authors believe that it might be well to consider further testing in a vertical or oblique plane rather than only in a centrifugal horizontal one. This method would tend to cause uncal herniation more readily. Monitoring of such effects could be done with the colored CT scan.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = sickness
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/11. Group psychotherapy during radiotherapy: effects on emotional and physical distress.

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether group psychotherapy during radiotherapy for cancer significantly decreases patients' emotional and physical distress. METHOD: Twenty-four patients receiving radiotherapy were randomly selected for group psychotherapy (six patients per group, 90-minute weekly sessions for 10 weeks). Another 24 patients served as control subjects. Each patient was given the Schedule for Affective Disorders and schizophrenia (SADS) at the onset of radiotherapy, midway through radiotherapy, at the end of radiotherapy, and 4 and 8 weeks after radiotherapy ended. RESULTS: The combined SADS items for depression, pessimism and hopelessness, somatic preoccupation and worry, social isolation and withdrawal, insomnia, and anxiety and agitation were used as a measure of emotional distress. The combined SADS items for anorexia, nausea and vomiting, and fatigue were used as a measure of physical distress. By 4 weeks after the end of radiotherapy, the patients who received group psychotherapy showed significant decreases in both emotional and physical symptoms, and the decreases were greater than those for the control patients. The subjects who initially seemed unaware of their cancer diagnoses had the lowest baseline levels of emotional and physical distress, but 4 weeks after the end of radiotherapy they had high distress levels. CONCLUSIONS: Group therapy may enhance quality of life for cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy by reducing their emotional and physical distress. The degree to which patients acknowledge the diagnosis of malignancy may be a factor in their initial distress level and their response to radiotherapy and group therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.044308228474983
keywords = motion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/11. A 33-year-old white female with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and hypotension.

    A thirty-three year old female presented to our emergency department complaining of severe abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. On physical examination she was hypotensive with a firm, tender abdomen, cervical motion tenderness and a diffuse erythematous rash. A surgical diagnosis of Acute pelvic inflammatory disease was made during laparoscopy. Coagulant studies, liver function tests, culture results, and the desquamation of the patient's palms led to the additional diagnosis of Toxic shock syndrome. A literature search failed to reveal any similar cases of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) occurring concomitantly. patients may present severely ill with either of these disease entities but potential for serious illness is greater when both of these syndromes occur in the same patient. We conclude that in patients with a similar presentation, the symptoms should not be attributed completely to PID without further investigation and consideration of a concomitant disease process including TSS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0049231364972204
keywords = motion
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Nausea'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.