Cases reported "Nausea"

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1/27. Intracerebral cyst associated with meningioma.

    A 27-year-old male had experienced an episode of severe headache and nausea, sometimes accompanied by an inability to name objects. magnetic resonance imaging showed a huge cyst within the left temporal lobe and a high degree of brain shift by it. A small round mass, which appeared to be a mural nodule, was located in the tip of left middle fossa. It was highly enhancing together with its attached dura mater, but the cyst wall was not enhanced. Sphenoid ridge meningioma with an associated intracerebral cyst or cystic glioma invading the dura mater was suspected. During surgery the small tumor was found to be arising from the sphenoid ridge and evaginating into the tip of the temporal lobe. The intracerebral cyst had a smooth surface and the tumor was visible outside the cyst through its wall. The tumor was totally removed, but the cyst wall was left without excision. Postoperatively he had no symptoms. Histological examination showed a microcystic meningioma. It is stressed that differentiations of cystic meningiomas from other cystic tumors and, of intratumoral from extratumoral cystic meningiomas using radiological, operative or histological findings are important.
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keywords = operative
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2/27. Internal orbital fractures in the pediatric age group: characterization and management.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the specific characteristics and management of internal orbital fractures in the pediatric population. DESIGN: Retrospective observational case series. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-four pediatric patients between the ages of 1 and 18 years with internal orbital ("blowout") fractures. methods: Records of pediatric patients presenting with internal orbital fractures over a 5-year period were reviewed, including detailed preoperative and postoperative evaluations, surgical management, and medical management. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ocular motility restriction, enophthalmos, nausea and vomiting, and postoperative complications. RESULTS: Floor fractures were by far the most common fracture type (71%). Eleven of 34 patients required surgical intervention for ocular motility restriction. Eight were trapdoor-type fractures with soft-tissue incarceration; five had nausea and vomiting. Early surgical intervention (<2 weeks) resulted in a more complete return of ocular motility compared with the late intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: Trapdoor-type fractures, usually involving the orbital floor, are common in the pediatric age group. These fractures may be small with minimal soft-tissue incarceration, making the findings on computed tomography scans quite subtle at times. Marked motility restriction and nausea/vomiting should alert the physician to the possibility of a trapdoor-type fracture and the need for prompt surgical intervention.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = operative
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3/27. Intraluminal duodenal obstruction by a gastric band following erosion.

    BACKGROUND: duodenal obstruction occurred 4 years following gastric banding for morbid obesity, which had had a good result. METHOD: A 56-year-old female with a history of gastric banding presented with duodenal obstruction. RESULT: Physical and radiological examination was able to give the diagnosis. At surgery, the gastric band in the distal duodenum was removed. She was discharged on postoperative day 4, with no complication. At 6 months following discharge, her nausea and vomiting have not recurred. CONCLUSION: Following gastric banding, band erosion through the gastric wall and internalization into the lumen can cause small bowel obstruction.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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4/27. Gallstone ileus as a complication of cholecystolithiasis.

    biliary fistula and gallston ileus are rarely found. The diagnosis is difficult. Gallstone ileus requires urgent and appropriate surgical therapy. Enterolitotomy remains the gold standard of operative treatment for gallstone ileus, but additional procedures of one-stage cholecystectomy and repair of fistula are necessary. Some researchers advise first to resolve the gallstone ileus and then to perform the elective operation for gallstone disease in more ideal circumstances. Our case had clinical evidence of ileus, which was confirmed by radiological exam. Ultrasonographic examination performed before operation did not confirm the presence of gallbladder; it did not detect a large stone located in the intestine. The patient, a 75-year-old woman, was operated on. During the procedure it was shown that the second part of the duodenum was involved in a scar and displaced to the hepatic hilus. There was no gallbladder; it was probably destroyed by a long-lasting vesicoduodenal fistula. cholangiography also did not detect the gallbladder. Biliary passage through the common bile duct was sufficient. The hole in the duodenum wall was sutured, and Kehr drain was inserted into the common bile duct. The gallstone was removed by incision of the intestine down to the obstruction. The postoperative period was complicated by a small suppuration of the laparotomy wound. Vesicoduodenal fistula present for a long time can lead to atrophy of the gallbladder. The one-stage procedure seems to be appropriate if biliary fistula and gallstone ileus are found.
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keywords = operative
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5/27. Anaesthetic management of hepatic artery chemoembolization in a paediatric patient.

    We present a case of a 3-year-old child who underwent hepatic artery chemoembolization. The anaesthetic management, prophylaxis of tumour lysis syndrome, nausea and vomiting and the management of perioperative pain relief are all discussed.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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6/27. superior mesenteric artery syndrome following surgery for scoliosis.

    STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective report of three cases outlining upper intestinal obstruction as a rare complication following surgery for scoliosis. OBJECTIVE: To present the clinical features, progression, and management of duodenal obstruction due to superior mesenteric artery compression after surgical treatment of scoliosis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Superior mesenteric artery or cast syndrome has been reported historically in the literature. Many causes are described, among which is the complication of the surgical and nonoperative treatment of scoliosis. methods: Three adolescent patients were investigated for nausea and vomiting following surgical correction of scoliosis. RESULTS: Contrast radiography confirmed extrinsic obstruction of the third part of the duodenum by the superior mesenteric artery in all three patients. They were jointly managed with the gastrointestinal surgeons. Two patients recovered with conservative treatments, but the third required operative intervention with a laparotomy. CONCLUSIONS: vomiting following surgery for scoliosis should be investigated thoroughly, as superior mesenteric artery syndrome carries significant morbidity, protracted hospital stay, and potential mortality.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/27. Central anticholinergic syndrome in a pediatric patient following transdermal scopolamine patch placement.

    A 9-year-old child was admitted to the hospital with congenital left ureteropelvic junction obstruction with massive left pyelocaliectasis and underwent dismembered pyeloplasty of the left kidney under general anesthesia without complications. Postoperatively, the child was placed on patient-controlled analgesia, with morphine as the drug of choice. The patient was discharged to the ward with adequate pain control and no complaints of nausea or vomiting. Once on the ward, a transdermal scopolamine patch was placed for nausea and vomiting. More than 24 hours after patch placement, the child experienced central anticholinergic syndrome (CAS) with hallucinations and incontinence. The scopolamine patch was promptly removed, and all symptoms of CAS rapidly ceased. A transdermal scopolamine patch should not be used in the pediatric population, and with extreme caution in the elderly. Treatment of CAS includes prompt removal of the patch, cleansing of the area, and possible physostigmine administration.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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8/27. Qualitative beta-hCG urine assays may be misleading in the presence of molar pregnancy: a case report.

    molar pregnancy is a rare complication of pregnancy and the diagnosis is usually confirmed with a markedly elevated beta-hCG and a "snowstorm" appearance on pelvic ultrasound. patients frequently present with a positive pregnancy test, vaginal bleeding, nausea and vomiting. A 23-year-old woman presented to our Emergency Department with a history of 7 weeks of intermittent vaginal bleeding and 1 h of peri-umbilical abdominal pain. She reported that 7 weeks before this visit she was diagnosed with a miscarriage. The bedside qualitative urine human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) test that we performed was negative, but the quantitative serum hCG was markedly elevated. Ultrasound and operative findings confirmed the diagnosis of molar pregnancy. We conclude that rapid urine qualitative hCG assays may not be reliable in the presence of markedly elevated hCG levels found in molar pregnancy.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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9/27. Primary idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum: two cases of acute abdomen in childhood.

    Idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum (ISIGO) is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain in childhood. The authors present the case histories of 2 children treated in their department. The children underwent surgery with preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis with atypical clinical presentation. The definitive diagnosis of segmental infarction of the great omentum was made intraoperatively and confirmed pathologically. Excision of the infracted omentum was curative.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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10/27. neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with metoclopramide antiemetic therapy.

    A case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 50-year-old woman with ovarian cancer is reported. The syndrome was associated with metoclopramide antiemetic therapy given for post-operative nausea and vomiting. dantrolene, bromocriptine, and supportive measures were effective in obtaining a complete resolution of the syndrome. This potentially lethal syndrome is perhaps underreported in the gynecologic literature. Heightened awareness of its signs and symptoms may cause more cases to be recognized and help improve its outcome.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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