Cases reported "Neck Injuries"

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1/41. Treatment of a neck burn contracture with a super-thin occipito-cervico-dorsal flap: a case report.

    Postburn neck contractures still represent a surgical challenge due to their exposed location; and early operative treatment is necessary for both functional as well as aesthetic reasons. An excellent functional result was obtained by using a supercharged super-thin occipito-cervico-dorsal flap described by Hyakusoku to repair a large defect of the anterior neck following a very wide neck burn contracture release. In this case report, the technique and its advantages among the other reconstructive modalities are discussed briefly.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/41. Cervical myositis ossificans traumatica: a rare location.

    An unusual case of myositis ossificans traumatica lesion located in the paraspinal region is reported. Despite the contiguity of the lesion with the cervical vertebrae and ominous appearance of the biopsy material, the history of antecedent trauma and computed tomography findings allowed preoperative accurate diagnosis. To our knowledge, myositis ossificans traumatica located in the cervical paraspinal region is very rare.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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3/41. Delayed post-traumatic cervical instability.

    BACKGROUND: Cervical spine instability is a clinical entity whose biomechanical and radiological features have been widely discussed by many authors. On the other hand, the subject of delayed post-traumatic cervical instability is often surrounded by confusion due to its difficult nosologic framing; the aim of this study is to contribute to the matter. methods: A cooperative study was organized by the Study Group for Spinal Surgery of the Italian Society of neurosurgery to evaluate cervical trauma patients surgically treated more than 20 days after the traumatic event. From a total number of 172 patients, twenty-five were admitted to the study, because neuroradiological investigations performed during the acute phase had shown either an absence of traumatic lesions or only minimal lesions judged to be stable. For this reason these 25 patients had not been treated by either surgery or immobilization in a halo vest. Some time after trauma, this group of patients clearly demonstrated evidence of unstable lesions requiring surgical treatment, following the appearance of new clinical signs or on neuroradiological follow-up. RESULTS: Re-examination of the neuroradiological investigations performed during the acute phase made it possible to identify elements that might have led us to suspect the presence of ligamental lesions: microfractures, dislocations less than 3 mm, and inversion of physiological lordosis. CONCLUSIONS: This review clearly indicates that patients with even mild cervical trauma must be scrupulously evaluated during the acute phase and that in some cases it is advisable to perform a more detailed neuroradiological investigation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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4/41. Multivascular trauma on an adolescent. Perioperative management.

    Penetrating vascular injury, in particular at the neck, is a life-threatening trauma not only of the nature and the anatomic proximity of cardiovascular, aerodigestive, glandular and neurologic system but also of the development of early and late complications. The following case report describes our experience with a penetrating wound patient, who was admitted to our emergencies twelve hours after the accident. The only demonstrable objective signs included a large hematoma at the right-side of the neck and distended mediastinum on the chest X-ray. As the patient was cardiovascularly unstable he was immediately transported to the theater without any angiography. The mandatory operative exploration was initially unsuccessful and a median sternotomy with a standard cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia circulatory arrest was established to restore all the vascular lesions. Actually, the patient was in critical condition with a rupture of the right internal jugular vein, a large pseudoaneurysm of the innominate artery and an avulsion of the ascending aorta with the suspicion of a cardiac tamponade. The postoperative period lasted two full months, while complications appeared. The substantial message from this multivascular trauma is the early diagnosis of the life-threatening complications as exsanguinations, ventricular fibrillation and the ability to minimize postoperative complications, which will impair the normal functional life of the patient.
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ranking = 7
keywords = operative
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5/41. Spinal intradural arachnoid cysts located anterior to the cervical spinal cord. Report of two cases and review of the literature.

    The authors describe two rare occurrences of radiographically, surgically, and pathologically confirmed spinal intradural arachnoid cysts (not associated with additional pathological entities) that were located anterior to the cervical spinal cord. These lesions have been reported previously in only eight patients. The patients described in this report were young adults who presented with progressive spastic tetraparesis shortly after sustaining mild cervical trauma and in whom no neurological deficit or bone fracture was demonstrated. The presence of an intradural arachnoid cyst was detected on postcontrast computerized tomography (CT) myelography and on magnetic resonance imaging; both diagnostic tools correctly characterized the cystic nature of the lesion. Plain radiography, plain tomography, and contrast-enhanced CT scans were not diagnostic. In both cases a laminectomy was performed, and the wall of the cyst was excised and fenestrated with subarachnoid space. Postoperatively, the patients made complete neurological recoveries. Based on a review of the literature, arachnoid cysts of the spinal canal may be classified as either extra- or intradural. Intradural arachnoid cysts usually arise posterior to the spinal cord in the thoracic spine region; however, these cysts very rarely develop in the cervical region. The pathogenesis of arachnoid cysts is unclear, although congenital, traumatic and inflammatory causes have been postulated. The authors believe that the formation of an arachnoid cyst cannot be explained by simply one mechanism because, in some reported cases, there has been accidental or iatrogenic trauma in association with congenital lesions. They also note that an intradural arachnoid cyst located anterior to the cervical spinal cord is an extremely rare disorder that may cause progressive myelopathy; however, the postoperative prognosis is good.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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6/41. life-threatening nail gun injuries.

    The use of pneumatic and explosive cartridge-activated nail guns is common in the construction industry. The ease and speed of nailing these tools afford enhance productivity at the cost of increased potential for traumatic injury. Although extremity injuries are most common, life-threatening injuries to the head, neck, chest, or abdomen and pelvis may occur. During a 20-month period, eight potentially life-threatening nail gun injuries were admitted to a Level I trauma center, including injuries to the brain, eye, neck, heart, lung, and femoral artery. Mechanism of injury included nail ricochet, nail gun misuse due to inadequate training, and successful suicide. Nail guns have significant potential for causing severe debilitating injury and death. These findings indicate a need for improved safety features and user education. The various types of nail guns, their ballistic potential, and techniques for operative management are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/41. Microsurgical combined scapular/parascapular flap for reconstruction of severe neck contracture: case report and literature review.

    OBJECTIVE: The reconstruction for severe neck contracture is difficult, because it may include not only the necessity the use of a large flap but also the ability for three-dimensional movement of the neck. methods: A 41-year-old woman sustained a severe neck contracture with retraction of the lower lip and limited range of neck motion after a chemical burn. We used the combined scapular/parascapular flap to reconstruct the soft-tissue defect in the neck after excision of hypertrophic scar and release of contracture. The scapular portion was transferred to cover the defect vertically, and the parascapular portion was transferred to cover the transverse portion of the neck. This kind of design would allow the patient to move her neck more easily. RESULTS: Postoperatively, the range of motion of the neck was full in the vertical and horizontal directions after 6 months of rehabilitation. Also, the patient was satisfied with the final aesthetic results. CONCLUSION: The microsurgical combined scapular/parascapular flap, providing a large area of tissue for coverage in three dimensions with a reliable blood supply by only one pedicle anastomosis during surgery, is a good option for reconstruction of the severe neck contracture. We classify the inset of the combined scapular/parascapular flap into three types with six subtypes, according to the location of defects and the relation of the parascapular flap to the scapular flap.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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8/41. Cervicogenic headache: long-term postoperative follow-up.

    The patient, a 50-year old female had been suffering from right-sided head- and neck pain since she was 31 years of age. It started in connection with an indirect neck trauma. analgesics were of little or no avail and operative procedures, including liberation of the greater occipital nerve (GON) (n = 2) and decompression of the C2 ganglion/root, had only a transitory effect. At 42, a magnetic resonance scan of the cervical spine demonstrated a degenerated disk C5-C6, with encroachment on the foramina and the cord. At 42 years of age, a stabilization operation at C5-C6 (Robinson-Smith) alleviated her discomfort--only some motor complaints in the ipsilateral upper extremity remaining and only in the first 12-18 months.
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ranking = 5
keywords = operative
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9/41. Penetrating neck injuries.

    Penetrating neck trauma may be managed operatively or nonoperatively, depending on precise anatomic location. Conservative management of zone II injuries is currently an issue under debate. We present a brief case report followed by a description of the current strategies for operative exploration and diagnostic maneuvers in penetrating neck injuries. Support for both expectant and operative management of zone II injuries is given. We conclude that for zone II injuries, mandatory exploration by an experienced surgeon is a safe approach and that conservative management must be undertaken with extreme caution.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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10/41. Facio-cervical transfixion by a metallic rod: a case report.

    foreign bodies penetrating into the neck may cause extensive neurovascular and aerodigestive tract injuries. Facio-cervical transfixion by a metallic rod without such injuries is very rare. The patient presented in this article reported to our center 5 hours after the road traffic accident with impacted hollow metallic rod traversing through the tongue, pharynx, and neck after causing fracture to maxilla. Exploration under general anesthesia after tracheostomy resulted in an uneventful extraction of the metallic rod. Postoperatively, the patient recovered completely and had no neurologic deficits. [editorial comment: This case report demonstrates an approach to an extremely difficult and potentially dangerous clinical problem. The authors decision to forego angiography is based on physical examination with evidence of palpable flow in the superficial temporal artery.]
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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