Cases reported "Neck Injuries"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/84. Isolated longitudinal rupture of the posterior tracheal wall following blunt neck trauma.

    The authors report 3 female children (4, 5 and 12 years old) who suffered an isolated rupture of the posterior tracheal wall (membranous part) following a minimal blunt trauma of the neck. Such tracheal ruptures often cause a mediastinal and a cutaneous thoraco-cervical emphysema, and can also be combined with a pneumothorax. The following diagnostic steps are necessary: X-ray and CT of the chest, tracheo-bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy. The most important examination is the tracheo-bronchoscopy to visualize especially the posterior wall of the trachea. Proper treatment of an isolated rupture of the posterior tracheal wall requires knowledge about the injury mechanisms. The decision concerning conservative treatment or a surgical intervention is discussed. In our 3 patients we chose the conservative approach for the following reasons: 1) The lesions of the posterior tracheal wall were relatively small (1 cm, 1.5 cm, 3 cm) and showed a good adaptation of the wound margins. 2) No cases showed an associated injury of the esophageal wall. All of our patients had an uneventful recovery, the lesion healed within 10 to 14 days, and follow-up showed no late complications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/84. Fatal neck injuries caused by blank cartridges.

    We report three cases where fatal neck injuries were caused by blanks from starting pistols. The weapons were loaded with blank cartridges or tear gas cartridges. Neither live ammunition nor any form of projectile was used. All three cases involved a contact discharge. The gas pressure caused by firing the weapons created extensive wound cavities in all three cases. Each victim died from blood loss as a result of ruptured cervical vessels; there were no air embolisms. In one case, a man shot himself eight times with two different starting pistols, and the wounds could be matched to each gun by the muzzle imprint marks on the neck.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/84. Multivascular trauma on an adolescent. Perioperative management.

    Penetrating vascular injury, in particular at the neck, is a life-threatening trauma not only of the nature and the anatomic proximity of cardiovascular, aerodigestive, glandular and neurologic system but also of the development of early and late complications. The following case report describes our experience with a penetrating wound patient, who was admitted to our emergencies twelve hours after the accident. The only demonstrable objective signs included a large hematoma at the right-side of the neck and distended mediastinum on the chest X-ray. As the patient was cardiovascularly unstable he was immediately transported to the theater without any angiography. The mandatory operative exploration was initially unsuccessful and a median sternotomy with a standard cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia circulatory arrest was established to restore all the vascular lesions. Actually, the patient was in critical condition with a rupture of the right internal jugular vein, a large pseudoaneurysm of the innominate artery and an avulsion of the ascending aorta with the suspicion of a cardiac tamponade. The postoperative period lasted two full months, while complications appeared. The substantial message from this multivascular trauma is the early diagnosis of the life-threatening complications as exsanguinations, ventricular fibrillation and the ability to minimize postoperative complications, which will impair the normal functional life of the patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/84. Tentative injuries to exposed skin in a homicide case.

    A 28-year-old man stabbed both his wife and his 3-year-old son to death, before unsuccessfully attempting to commit suicide. The incident occurred against a background of marital conflict. The child's body exhibited six tentative wounds to the skin in the area of the heart, with no corresponding defects in the overlying clothing, a pattern normally seen only in suicide. Their presence can be explained by the fact that this can be considered an extended suicide, the father's motivation for the killing being comparable to that for true suicide. However, wounds of this nature can be produced in such cases only if the victim is severely limited in his ability to defend himself, here due to the superior physical strength of the father.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/84. death caused by a chain saw--homicide, suicide or accident? A case report with a literature review (with 11 illustrations).

    A 31-year-old farm worker was found dead beside a chain saw. Based on the testimony of a colleague and because of the situation at the site, the police very soon presupposed an accident. It was assumed that the victim had slipped on the sudden ground and had been killed by the subsequent swerving of the saw when starting the engine. The body presented with a deep lacerated wound at the right side of the nape of the neck, including the first cervical vertebra, the medullary canal and the right mandible as well as multiple fissures of the occipital bone, which were attributed to repeated forceful use of the chain by another person. A second wound with relatively sharp edges and a tangential fissure in the corresponding area of the skull raised the suspicion that an axe or some similar device had been used. Although the forensic medical findings seemed to give clear evidence of external violence, no further investigations have been carried out so far by the authorities.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/84. Unstable cervical spine without spinal cord injury in penetrating neck trauma.

    Cervical spine instability in the neurologically intact patient following penetrating neck trauma has been considered rare or non-existent. We present a case of a woman with an unstable C5 fracture without spinal cord injury after a gunshot wound to the neck. Considerations regarding the risk of cervical spine instability are discussed, as well as suggestions for a prudent approach to such patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/84. Blunt carotid artery injury after accidental neck compression: report of a case.

    Almost all cases of carotid artery injury are precipitated by a high-energy impact such as motor vehicle accidents or gunshot wounds, and are usually diagnosed using angiography. We report herein a case of carotid artery injury induced by a low-energy insult with rare clinical signs which was diagnosed using ultrasonography as well as angiography. A 37-year-old man sustained an accidental compression of the neck and was transferred to our emergency room. Horner's syndrome and phrenic nerve palsy were detected on the left side. ultrasonography demonstrated two sites of injury with an intimal flap of the distal left common carotid artery as well as angiography. The patient was placed on anticoagulants and was discharged on the 10th hospital day with both Horner's syndrome and phrenic nerve palsy. This case suggests that surgeons should investigate any possible carotid artery injury, even after low-velocity injuries such as compression of the neck, and therefore an ultrasonic examination should be performed at the initial evaluation and at follow-up studies. In addition, further investigations are also called for to investigate the utility of anticoagulation in the treatment of carotid artery injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/84. Penetrating neck injury: case report and evaluation of management.

    Greater urban violence has resulted in an increased incidence of penetrating neck trauma. Penetrating neck wounds can present difficult diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. The evaluation and management of such injuries, however, remains controversial. There is no universally accepted specific approach to the management of patients with penetrating neck injuries, with some surgeons advocating mandatory neck exploration whilst others believe in selective surgical intervention. We believe that an equal willingness for both conservative and surgical intervention as dictated by serial bedside evaluation with adequate radiological and endoscopic support can provide the clinician a safe and effective means of managing a potentially complex and lethal problem.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/84. Foreign body in injury--an important evidence.

    In the present paper, a complete case is discussed, that is from the crime upto judgement in the court of law, from the Forensic point of view. The postmortem examination was conducted by the author in which a metallic fragment of size of a mustard seed was found in a incised wound. On chemical analyzers examination, the metal fragment matched with the suspected weapon, in respect of spectrochemical contents. This evidence became an important part in the investigation for conviction of the accused in the court of law. This indicates that when-ever any foreign body, whatever it may be or of whatever size, should not be neglected while examining the injury before death of after death, since it can become an important piece of evidence.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/84. A biomechanical reconstruction of a wound caused by a glass shard--a case report.

    During the course of a criminal trial, an investigating pathologist is commonly asked how much force was required to produce an injury. This subjective opinion is based on the pathologist's previous experience of dealing with wounds inflicted with similar weapons. However, in the case of stab wounds inflicted by broken glass, it is unlikely that two glass fragments would be physically similar. In the case studied, two theories were examined: that a wound resulted from a thrown glass fragment or that it had been caused as a stab injury by the glass held in the bare hand. The investigation involved quantifying the energy required for human tissue penetration, comparison of sharpness, a biomechanical analysis of throwing actions and testing of the hypothesis that if the glass shard were used as a stabbing implement it would result in a cut to the hand.The investigation utilised a scientific methodology that reduced the need for speculative (though informed) opinion from the pathologist by producing quantitative results.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Neck Injuries'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.